Math in a Minute: 100th Day Edition

Volume 3 Issue 15

Ideas in Pictures

What is 100?

Here are some interesting facts about "100" things and topics. There are ideas that are great for lower and upper grade levels.

  • The roman numeral C represents 100.
  • On the Celsius scale, 100 degrees is the boiling temperature of pure water.
  • The sum of the first 9 prime numbers is 100.
  • The United States Senate has 100 senators.
  • There are 100 cents in a dollar.
  • There are 100 years in a century.
  • The number 100 is the police telephone number in Greece, India, Israel and Nepal.
  • There are 100 yards in an American football field (not including the end zones).
  • Wilt Champerlain, a basketball player for the Philadelphia Warriors, set the the record on March 2, 1962 for the number of points scored in one NBA game by a single player. He scored 100 points.
  • Woodrow Wilson was our president 100 years ago.
  • A 100 watt light bulb lasts for about 750 hours.
  • If you had 100 billion dollars, you could spend 3 million dollars a day, every day, for the next 100 years.
  • Rip Van Winkle slept for 100 years.
  • Benjamin Franklin's picture is on the $100 dollar bill.

100 Activities for the 100th Day

Here are some 100th Day activities... There are some ideas you may not have seen before in bold print!  Enjoy!


  • Have kids complete this sentence: I wish I had 100 _____________ because _________________.
  • Plant 100 seeds with your students.
  • Ask kids to fill in the missing words: "On the first day of school, I couldn't __________, but on the 100th day of school, I can!"
  • Challenge students to run a 100-yard dash.
  • Have students collect 100 cans of food, and donate them to a local soup kitchen.
  • Read I'll Teach My Dog 100 Words, by Michael Frith, to your class.
  • Challenge students to learn 100 new words.
  • Ask children to estimate how long 100 inches and 100 feet are and check their estimates.
  • Provide a weather map, and ask students to count the places where the temperature was higher than 100 degrees.
  • Have students estimate whether 100 ounces will fill a pint, a quart, a half-gallon, or a gallon container and check their answers.
  • Challenge students to collect 100 of the most unusual items they can think of.
  • Ask kids to finish the sentence "One hundred years from now, ..."
  • Have students make a list of 100 nouns, 100 verbs, and 100 adjectives.
  • Together with your students, learn to say one hundred in another language.
  • Ask kids to count to 100 by ones, twos, fives, and tens.
  • Have children circle the hundreds place in 100 numbers.
  • Have students circle the hundredths place in 100 numbers.
  • Challenge children to locate on a map all the cities that are 100 miles away from yours.
  • With your students, send a postcard to a school in some or all of the cities 100 miles away from yours.
  • CNN recently listed 100 Places to Live. Why not challenge your students to write 100 reasons to live in their town or county? Create a bulletin board. When you take down the bulletin board, make a book of students's work. The local Chamber of Commerce might want to keep a copy of this book or to create a brochure based on your students' work.
  • Have students compare the time it takes to melt 100 ice cubes at several different air temperatures -- inside, outside, next to a heater, next to a fan -- and show the results in a chart or graph.
  • Ask kids to measure the amount of water in 100 melted ice cubes.
  • Have students make a list of 100 things that didn't exist 100 years ago.
  • Together with your class, write a 100-word introduction to a continuous story. Then ask 100 people to add to it.
  • Challenge students to make up 100 word or number problems with 100 in them.
  • Provide materials for kids to make 100 snowflakes.
  • Ask each student to list 100 words he or she can read.
  • Read One Hundred Is a Family, by Pam Munoz Ryan, to your students. Ask them to draw a picture of their families.
  • Challenge kids to find out what happened on This Day in History 100 years ago.
  • Help your students make a classroom quilt with 100 squares in it.
  • Have students count to 1,000 by 100s.
  • Together with students' families, create a cookbook of 100 favorite recipes.
  • Play one of the on-line counting games at Counting to 100.
  • Ask children to estimate what the date will be in 100 days and to check their estimates on a calendar.
  • Help your students list 100 flavors of ice cream, and have them vote for their favorites. Show the results in a chart.
  • Challenge kids to make a list of 100 words that start with C -- the Roman numeral for 100.
  • Read One Hundred Hungry Ants, by Eleanor Pinczes, to your students. Help them make a book of 100 different bugs.
  • Ask kids to write a list of 100 opposites.
  • Help children send 100 cards to a local nursing home.
  • Count how many of the 100 Picture Books Everyone Should Know you and your classmates have read.
  • Challenge students to perform 100 acts of kindness.
  • Help children create 100 legs for a bulletin board centipede.
  • Have kids make a chain of 100 paper links and measure how long it is.
  • Ask students to cut out magazine or newspaper photographs of 100 important people. Create a bulletin board display.
  • With your class, sing the "Rockin' to One Hundred" song.
  • Help students learn a game that children played 100 years ago.
  • Challenge kids to find out what a group of 100 parrots, 100 whales, 100 skunks, or 100 lions is called. They can make a book of animal groups.
  • Ask each student to write 100 on a piece of drawing paper and incorporate the numeral into a drawing.
  • Have kids put 100 words in alphabetical order.
  • Invite someone 100 years old to visit the classroom.
  • Challenge kids to do 100 jumping jacks.
  • Ask students to find out who was president of the United States 100 years ago.
  • Challenge students to think of as many addition problems as they can with a sum of 100.
  • Have kids estimate which classroom items, or groups of items, weigh 100 pounds and check their estimates.
  • Can students predict 100 things that will be invented during the next 100 years?
  • Ask children to make as many words as possible using the letters in the words one hundred.
  • Time students as they jump rope 100 times.
  • Assign a number, from 1 to 26, to each letter of the alphabet. Does anyone's name add up to 100?
  • Ask kids to find the numeral 100 in today's newspaper. How many times does it appear?
  • Play a circle game. The first child begins, "I went to the zoo and I saw one giraffe." The second child continues, "I went to the zoo and I saw one giraffe and two bears." Can students reach 100?
  • Ask children to guess which container -- of pennies, golf tees, jelly beans, thumbtacks, etc. -- has 100 in it.
  • Have kids write their names using 100 paper dots.
  • Read aloud I'll Teach My Dog 100 Words. If you teach older students, you might share some of the 100 Best Poems for Children.
  • With kids, make a 100th day snack, using 100 raisins, 100 M&Ms, 100 pieces of cereal, 100 banana slices, and so on.
  • Play bingo with your class, using a 100s chart.
  • Challenge students to tell 100 jokes.
  • Help students create a sculpture using 100 items.
  • Have kids count 10x10 Jelly Beans.
  • Provide materials for children to make a 100-inch worm and a 100-centimeter worm and compare the lengths.
  • Ask kids to estimate which weighs more 100 rubber bands or 100 paper clips and check their estimates.
  • Brainstorm with your class a list of 100 round objects, 100 square objects, 100 triangular objects, and 100 rectangular objects.
  • Ask children to make a picture using 100 shapes.
  • Collect 100 buttons, and have kids categorize them according to shape, size, number of holes, etc.
  • Have each student finish the sentence, "If I had $100, "
  • Have students count how many times they can bounce a ball in 100 seconds.
  • Have small groups of students flip a coin 100 times and record the results in a table or graph.
  • Help each child write the numeral 100 with glue and sprinkle it with glitter.
  • Have a beanbag toss. Who can score 100 first?
  • Blow up 100 balloons. Ask kids to arrange them into groups in as many different ways as possible.
  • Challenge students to collect 100 autographs.
  • How many of TIME magazine's 100 Most Important People of the 20th Century can your students identify?
  • As a class project, make a solar system mural with 100 stars.
  • Brainstorm with students a list of machines that can go faster than 100 miles per hour.
  • Have students research animals that migrate farther than 100 miles.
  • On separate index cards, write the numerals 1 through 100. Shuffle the cards, and have children put the numerals in order.
  • Ask each child to bring to school one thing that represents 100 -- a $1 bill, a 100-watt lightbulb, a picture of an athlete wearing number 100, and so on.
  • With your class, visit Zoom Dinosaurs to learn which dinosaurs were 100 feet long, then make a dinosaur book.
  • Find out how many students, laid end to end, would equal 100 inches.
  • Ask each student to finish the sentence, "If I've told you once, I've told you 100 times."
  • Read to your class The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins, by Dr. Suess.
  • Challenge each child to complete a 100-piece puzzle.
  • Brainstorm with your class a list of 100 U.S. cities.
  • As a group, write 100 compound words.
  • Create a treasure hunt with 100 clues for your class to follow.
  • Challenge your class to read 100 books.
  • With your students, create a mural showing what school was like 100 years ago, what it's like today, and what it will be like 100 years from now.
  • Ask each child to finish the sentence, "One hundred is an important number because."
  • Survey 100 students to find out their favorite 100th-day activity. Show the results in a chart.
  • Sit perfectly still -- and perfectly quiet -- for 100 seconds with your whole class!
  • From Education World