Environmental Issue of the Week

"Global warming doubles the risk of extreme La Nina event, research shows"

The risk of extreme La Niña events in the Pacific Ocean could double due to global warming, new research has shown.El Niño-Southern OscillationGlobal warmingClimateOceanAttribution of recent climate changeGulf StreamThe projected twofold increase in the frequency of this potentially devastating weather phenomenon across the globe could lead to increased droughts in south-western United States, floods in the western Pacific regions and Atlantic hurricanes.Furthermore, with around 70 per cent of these increased La Niña events projected to follow immediately after an extreme El Niño event, parts of the world could experience weather patterns that switch between extremes of wet and dry.The latest collaborative international research saw scientists, including Professor Mat Collins from the University of Exeter, use state-of-the-art climate modelling to determine how global warming will influence the frequency of future extreme La Niña events.The findings are published in the leading scientific journal, Nature Climate Change.El Niño and La Niña events are opposite phases of the natural climate phenomenon, the El Niño/Southern Oscillation. Extreme La Niña events occur when cold sea surface temperatures in the central Pacific Ocean contrast with the warming land areas of Maritime Southeast Asia in the west and create a strong temperature gradient.The new research suggests that increased land warming, coupled with an increase in frequency of extreme El Niño events, will mean extreme La Niña could occur every 13 years, rather than the 23 years previously seen.Co-author Professor Collins, from Exeter's College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences explained: "Our previous research showed a doubling in frequency of extreme El Niño events, and this new study shows a similar fate for the cold phase of the cycle. It shows again how we are just beginning to understand the consequences of global warming."The new research was led by scientist Dr Wenju Cai, from the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and featured scientists from Australia, China, the US, France and Peru.Dr Cai indicated the potential impact of this change in climate. He said: "An increased frequency in extreme La Niña events, most of which occur in the year after an extreme El Niño, would mean an increase in the occurrence of devastating weather events with profound socio-economic consequences."

University of Exeter. "Global Warming Doubles Risk of Extreme La Niña Event, Research Shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 Jan. 2015. Web. 27 Jan. 2015.
The article "Global warming doubles risk of extreme La Nina event, research shows" by the University of Exeter is very interesting and shows startling data. Overall, it is a warning of what the future weather will be like due to global warming. This article explains that due to global warming, La Nina events will now happen more often. Instead of occurring every 13 years, it would occur every 23 years. La Nina and El Nino are events that occur when cold sea surface temperatures in the central Pacific Ocean contrast with the warming lands areas of Maritime Southeast Asia. This contrast creates a strong temperature gradient. Overall, this is a very startling fact since the effects of this occurrence can be very damaging. The potentially devastating effects include droughts in south-western United States, floods in the western Pacific regions, and Atlantic hurricanes. This article also mentioned that these events would occur immediately after extreme El Nino events. As a result, many parts of the world would experience periods of extreme wet and dry. Overall, this event is a result of global warming. Global warming is the increase of the temperature as a result of human activities that will cause seas levels to rise as well. Many harmful gases that are released from human activities include methane gas and carbon dioxide. Basically, the increase of La Nina events is due to the extreme weather as a result of global warming. Action that we can take is lowering the use of fossil fuels or non renewable resources. Something we can do is carpool, buy Hybrid cars, walk and take bikes. In addition, we need to turn to the use of renewable energy. I know that everyone has an iPhone or iPad so we should be more conscience of unplugging chargers. Also, something else we can do is turn off unused lights. Finally, we need to use our voices and be advocates for the prevention of global warming to avoid extreme weather events such as this.


 

   

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2 years ago
0

I will drive less and make an effort to walk more.

2 years ago
1

I am gonna turn the lights off in my room when I leave the house 🔆🔅

2 years ago
0

I will definitely carpool back and forth from school and not use the heat excessively.

2 years ago
0

I don't already unplug my chargers (although I should) so today, when I get home, I will make sure to unplug devices I'm not using.

2 years ago
0

Unplug my devices when I don't need them

2 years ago
0

I will turn off the lights in my house that I am not using and continue walking/carpooling to school.

2 years ago
0

To stop global warming, I am going to turn off the water as I wash my dishes.

2 years ago
0

I'm going to I take faster showers and turns the lights off In my house

2 years ago
0

I wil carpool to and from school so as to reduce carbon emmissions

2 years ago
0

i will unplug y charger andcarpool