Paraguay

"Political Map." Map. World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 3 Nov. 2014

"National anthem of Paraguay." Video. ABC-CLIO. World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 2 Nov. 2014.

"National anthem of Paraguay." Video. ABC-CLIO. World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 2 Nov. 2014.

http://worldgeography.abc-clio.com/Topics/Display/142?sid=1663279&cid=5&oid=1663279&useConcept=False

Brief History

     Paraguay used to called home to a group of tribes that are known as the Guarani, they were settled there before the European conquest. Spanish colonists began to follow explorers to Paraguay as the land became more known. The country known as Argentina and Paraguay were joint rulers of the colonists until 1620 when the viceroyalty of Peru intervened. At the beginning of the 17th century all the way to the year 1767, Jesuit missionaries controlled the area. They converted and educated the Guarani making them a formidable force within the colonies. Paraguay claimed its independence from the viceroyalty of Peru on May 14th, 1811, a year after Argentina became an independent country.

"Paraguay: History." World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 2 Nov. 2014.

"Drawing of Paraguayan cavalry troops in the War of the Triple Alliance." Photos/Illustrations. Library of Congress. World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 3 Nov. 2014.

Food
and Cuisine

    A commonality of the Paraguayan diet are cassava and grains. Cassava is a root of a rainforest tree, and requires careful preparation to remove the cyanide from the root's flesh. Most Paraguayans drink tea, although mosto, which is made from sugar cane juices, is also a popular drink. A few common soups are sooya sopy (pronounced sue-soppy), and bori-bori. Sooya sopy is a thick meaty soup with a side of rice and or noodles, and bori-bori is a soup with dumplings stuffed with either meat or vegetables.  Bread, or chipas (pronounced hi-pus), is usually served as a maize bread given flavors by cheese and eggs and is a common serving with bori-bori. As a dessert, most Paraguayans have mbaipy he-é (pronounced maybe-he), which is made from milk, molasses, and corn.

"Paraguay: Food and Holidays." World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 3 Nov. 2014.

The Arts

   

   ABC-CLIO states, "National forms of creative expression seem to reflect a melding of the Spanish and Amerindian cultures." Most of Paraguay's folk music, or songs with a story, along with folk tale literature seem to follow the Guarani traditions. There has been a lot of work to help preserve the Guarani culture, an example of those measures is the establishment of the Guarani Language and Culture Academy and similar organizations. A "traditional handicraft" to the modern Paraguayans is making nanduti, which can be considered as lace. Although, nanduti, is a Guarani term that means "spider web". The lace is delicately made with materials like cotton, line, or silk and usually takes several weeks to complete. The Guaranis, at one point, created and composed songs that were played with instruments like bells, whistles, flutes, and percussion instruments. A while later, the Spanish influence over the Guaranis added guitars and similar stringed instruments to song composure. Unfortunately, native music during the pre-Colombian era no longer exists, forcing folk music to be performed by groups using both native and Spanish instruments. Since the 1930's, a type of music known today as the guarania and is described as a "melancholy, dreamlike quality, has been popularized"

"Paraguay: Arts and Landmarks." World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 3 Nov. 2014.

Climate and
Land Formations

    Paraguay is a "landlocked" nation in the heart of South America, meaning that the country itself does not reach the oceans. The Paraguay River splits Paraguay in two and is the definition of the country's main "biogeographic regions" as ABC-CLIO calls it. To the west of the Paraguay River is a plain, also called a chaco, where the climate can range from the an arid savanna, to a humid swamp. To the east of the Paraguay River is fertile hills. This region is considered to be the "economic center of Paraguay" and is home to 98% of its people while layered with rain forests. The area used for growing soybeans, wheat, tobacco, and corn.

     In the eastern portion of Paraguay the climate is considered to be temperate, which means mild temperatures and conditions. Humid air invades Paraguay during the summers, and in the winter chilly southern winds cut through the land. Over all, summer temperatures range from 77°F to 104 °F. During the winter the temperature can vary from 61°F to 71°F. Occasionally, in extreme cases the temperatures can drop to 30°F. The heaviest precipitation falls from October to April, and ranges from 65 inches in eastern Paraguay to 55 inches along the Paraguay River. Precipitation lessens as you travel across Chaco Boreal, coming down to about 30 inches. Unfortunately, all of Paraguay is at risk to floods and droughts, which are known to be responsible for crop damage and loss.

"Paraguay: Landforms & Climate." World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 3 Nov. 2014.

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