The Ocean

Biotic Factors-living
Animals:                                 Plants:
whales                                    Coral
Dolphins                                 Seaweed
turtles                                    Kelp                                  
fishes                                     Plankton

Abiotic Factors-non living
water
sunlight
shells
sand
rocks

BY:EMILY PEREZ

Carrying Capacity

IF THE PREDATOR(GREAT WHITE) POPULATION GOES DOWN THEN THE PREY(SEAL) POPULATION GOES UP;

AND IF THEY PREY(SEAL) GOES DOWN THEN THE PREDATOR(GREAT WHITE) WILL GO UP!

The carrying capacity of a biological species in an environment is the maximum population size of the species that the environment can sustain indefinitely, given the food, habitat, water, and other necessities available in the environment.

The resources needed for the ecosystem to survive is:
WATER, SPACE, HABITAT,FOOD

Limiting Factors

Limiting factors are environmental influences that constrain the productivity of organisms, populations, or communities and thereby prevent them from achieving their full biological potential which could be realized under optimal conditions. Limiting factors can be single elements or a group of related factors.

THE limiting factors that are needed in the ocean are:

Factors that limit the type of life forms able to live in an ocean environment include temperature, sunlight, pressure, oxygen concentration and nutrient availability. Because of its many varied attributes, the ocean offers a unique home to aquatic life.

The predator/prey relationship is not good because my predator is a great white and my prey is a seal and great whites eat seals. It affects limiting factors by the prey and predators may each go down or up?

whale eating a seal

#1. Fish- LEVEL 2/Can be eaten by other species
#2. Whale- LEVEL 3/Pretty much at the top of the pyramid
#3. Kelp- PRODUCER/Eaten by everything
#4. Shells- PRODUCER/Used for homing facilities for crabs, etc.

Producer: The sun is where the producers get its energy
1st Level: They get there energy from the producers
2nd  Level: They get there energy from the first level producers
3rd Level: They get there energy from the second level producers

Because they are the base of our food chain, primary consumers such as herbivores (plant eaters) eat producers when secondary consumers (omnivores) eat those and finally tertiary consumers eat those.tertiary consumers consist of people,bears,etc

Because then you can show producer,level 1,level 2,level 3.
And you can show more animals and they energy flow more clearly.

IF YOU TOOK AWAY THE SHARK POPULATION WHO WOULD INCREASE THE POPULATION OF LEVEL 2.

PRODUCERS: Algae,Barnacles,Kelp

LEVEL 1: Types and species of fish and shrimp and crabs

LEVEL 2: Bigger types of fish and crabs and seals

LEVEL 3: Octopus and Sharks and Whales and Dolphins and Squid

A graphical model that is shaped like a pyramid to show how the energy flows through a food chain, how the amount of energy is decreasing and becoming less available for organisms as it enters each trophic level, and how much of the energy in the ecosystem is lost to the atmosphere as heat.

The producers are in a bigger base because there more of them and it starts out with more of them.
And the level 3 people are caught and killed by people and don't come in as large of an amount.

PHOTOSYNTHESIS:

C6,H12,O6

NEEDED:   WATER,SUNLIGHT,CO2 {carbon dioxide}

PRODUCED:O2 {oxygen}

IN THE LEAF

TROPISMS: the turning of all or part of an organism in a particular direction in response to an external stimulus.

THEY PROVIDE OXYGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE AND GIVE OFF OXYGEN TO THE PLANTS.

They help the plants in my ecosystems by giving it CO2 and 02

In the ocean, most animal waste falls to the ocean floor. Here creatures such as crabs, starfish, and sea urchins feed on the waste. Other animals do not wait for the waste to fall to the bottom. Barnacles, mussels, and many other creatures are filter feeders. They stay in one place. There, they filter small pieces of food out of the water.

Read more: DECOMPOSERS - Big Decomposers, OCEAN CLEANERS, Little Decomposers - Waste, Fungi, Soil, and Animal - JRank Articles http://science.jrank.org/kids/pages/62/DECOMPOSERS.html#ixzz3XaXbL3mh

Decomposer are the organisms that break down the final remains of living things. Bacteria and fungi play an important role in freeing the last of the minerals and nutrients from organics and recycling them back into the food web.
Hagfish, worms and other crap that floats in the sea are the decomposers of the ocean biome. Shrimp are decomposers too because like crabs, they take ocean waste, eat it and clean it up.

Succession is a process of ecological change in which a series of natural communities are established and then replaced over time. Ecologists (scientists who study the relationships of organisms with their living and nonliving environment) generally recognize two kinds of succession, primary succession and secondary succession. Primary succession takes place on an area that is originally completely empty of life. As an example, an area that has been covered by a flow of lava has, for a time, no life at all on it. Over a period of time, however, various kinds of organisms begin to grow in the area. Over time, the variety of life-forms changes as succession continues.

Read more: http://www.scienceclarified.com/Sp-Th/Succession.html#ixzz3XacroeGl

THE BLANK SPACE ABOVE IS A VIDEO!

Animals live in a variety of unique environments. To survive in many of these environments, animals have adapted both behaviorally and physically. At the Zoo, you can observe some of the special physical adaptations that animals have developed over the ages. In this tour, you will be introduced to the world of animal adaptations, including what adaptations are, why some adaptations benefit an animal, and which animals typify certain adaptations.

Over the last 2,000 million years, plant and animal life on earth has continuously evolved from its simple beginnings in the oceans to the complex existence lived today. It's no accident that protoplasm, a substance found in every living cell, strongly resembles seawater. Although some animals emerged from the sea millions of years ago to fill all available niches on land, some remained in the ocean and evolved and adapted to life beneath the surface.The ocean covers the majority of the planet, yet it remains a little understood realm as scientists are limited in the study of habitats that lack physical boundaries and can span thousands of miles.Each form of marine life has become adapted to a specific niche with a relatively narrow variation in salinity, temperature, and light. The high salt content found in the ocean can support the large bodies of giant squids and whales, which has allowed them to evolve without the use of strong limbs for support. Nevertheless, salt water exerts enormous pressure on the air spaces of marine animals at depth (fluids like blood are practically incompressible). For every 33 feet of water, pressure increases by 14.7 pounds per square inch (equal to one atmosphere every 10 meters) which limits our depths significantly unless we use diving craft specifically designed to maintain one atmosphere. And yet all sorts of other organisms thrive at high pressure. Some of them are even air-breathing surface dwellers like us. Weddell seals and elephant seals can dive up to a mile (sperm whales go much deeper than that). All these animals seem to share the same secret: Instead of fighting the pressure, they let it collapse their lungs completely. Some oxygen remains in their lungs, but they mostly store it in their muscles, where it's needed; their muscle tissue contains much higher concentrations of oxygen-binding myoglobin than ours does. Moreover, collapsed lungs give deep-diving mammals another big advantage, as a team led by Terrie Williams of the University of California at Santa Cruz reported last year. Once a seal's lungs have collapsed, it becomes heavier than water, and so it sinks. Thus it doesn't have to flap flukes or flippers all the way down; it reaches great depths mostly by gliding effortlessly, saving its oxygen stores for the strenuous climb back to the surface.

THE BLANK SPACE BELOW IS A VIDEO

Water is an almost magical chemical. Its properties never cease to amaze - imagine a chemical that gets more dense as it cools - until it reaches a point where it rapidly becomes less dense! It dissolves many inorganic materials as well as organic ones. Organisms can build macromolecules to attract or repel water as needed simply by varying the charge on side chains. Water exists primarily as a liquid at normal temperatures, yet a significant amount can often be found in the atmosphere. Its density is great enough to support the bodies of many types of creatures, often eliminating or reducing the need for elaborate skeletons. The surface tension of water helps it climb trees and support small organisms. It limits the amount of that notorious toxin oxygen that can reach an organism, yet usually carries just enough O2 to support cellular respiration. Large bodies of water heat and cool so slowly that they effectively insulate the organisms within them from daily (and sometimes seasonal) temperature changes. And, of course, water and its ability to store and move heat controls weather on our planet. Often, in our considerations of biological systems, we, being terrestrial organisms, speak of the "problems" associated with living in water. We talk about "adaptations" to aquatic life, about the "pressures" (both real and figurative) of living in aquatic habitats. We use terms like "the cruel sea" or "the cold ocean". We are probably wrong. Life evolved in the oceans and is most at home there. Truth be known, terrestrial habitats are the most difficult and require the most "adaptations", at least in the sense that an adaptation is a modification of some original form. Still, the aquatic world is alien to us, and we will no doubt carry our prejudices and biases with us throughout this course.

The process whereby organisms better adapted to their environment tend to survive and produce more offspring. The theory of its action was first fully expounded by Charles Darwin and is now believed to be the main process that brings about evolution.

More organisms are born than can survive. Organisms vary in their characteristics, even within a species. Variation is inherited.Differences in reproduction and survival are due to variation among organisms. If all four of these conditions occur, which they commonly do in both natural and human-influenced ecological systems, then natural selection will occur. If any of these is not true, then natural selection cannot occur. Let's consider each of these in a bit more detail.

Comment Stream

2 years ago
0

Nice pictures

2 years ago
0

Check your spacing in biotic factors, and check that capitalization is consistant. Try and be more specific with abiotic factors.

2 years ago
0

like your pictures!

2 years ago
0

This has a lot of great information and love the pictures

2 years ago
0

Great information.

2 years ago
0

you should take away the # signs