THE FIVE ELEMENTS OF A SHORT STORY

CHARACTERS

TYPES OF CHARACTERS

Round - the characters you know in the story, a major well-developed character

Flat - a minor character, one with a simple personality, no depth

Static - a character that does not change or grow

Dynamic - a character that normally faces a conflict in the story and changes

Look at the TV shows, movies and books above.

Name a ROUND character.

Name a FLAT character.

Name a DYNAMIC character.

Name a STATIC character.

A FEW MORE ELEMENTS OF CHARACTER

Protagonist - the main character that faces a conflict

Antagonist - the person, group, or force the character is working against, the opposing force

Motivation - why a character thinks, feels or behaves a certain way

Look at the movies and books above.

Name the PROTAGONIST in at least two.

Name the ANTAGONIST in at least two.

Name the MOTIVATION for the characters in Toy Story, Pirates, and The Wizard of Oz.

FINALLY CHARACTERIZATION

Direct characterization: tells the audience DIRECTLY what the personality is

Indirect characterization: shows things that reveal the personality of the character

Choose one character from above and give me one example of DIRECT CHARACTERIZATION.

Choose one character from above and give me one example of INDIRECT CHARACTERIZATION.

SETTING

The WHEN and WHERE of the story

When: season, timeframe in history, time of day, month, etc.

Where: the location, the type of climate

PLOT

ELEMENTS OF PLOT

THE EVENTS

Exposition - the introduction to the story, setting it up

Rising Action - the events leading to the major event

Climax - the story changes or the conflict is resolved

Falling Action - the events that tie up all the loose ends

Resolution/ Denouement - the end, the "happily ever after"

THEME

Theme - the moral, the meaning or the lesson that the author wants us to learn from the story

POINT OF VIEW

The vantage point from which an author presents a story.

First Person - told using "I, my, mine" - this creates bias because the reader only sees it from one character's point of view

Second Person - told using "you, yours" - RARE

Third Person - told using "he, she, it, they" - most commonly used because it is the most flexible

Omniscient - an "all-knowing" narrator lets us see into each character's thoughts and actions

Limited - the reader sees one character's thoughts, actions, etc. and simply shows the other characters' actions

Objective - a neutral, impersonal narrator, simply states the facts