White Fang Imagery

It was in this way that the gray cub learned other attributes of his mother than the soft, soothing tongue.  In his insistent crawling toward the light, he discovered her a nose that with a sharp nudge administered rebuke, and later, a paw that crushed him down or rolled him over and over with a swift calculating stroke. (Page 72 Chapter 6)

The cub was in a frenzy of terror, yet he lay without movement of sound, frozen, petrified into immobility, to all appearances dead.  His mother, coming home, growled as she smelt the wolverine's track, and bounded into the cave and licked and nozzled him with undue vehemence and affection. (Page 80 Chapter 7)

  1. There was a rush.  White Fang bristled and snarled and snapped in the face of the open-mouthed oncoming wave of dogs, and went down under them, feeling the sharp slash of teeth in his body, himself biting and tearing at the legs and bellies above him. There was a great uproar. He could hear the snarl of Kiche as she fought for him; and he could hear the cries of the man-animals, the sound of clubs striking upon bodies, and the yelps of pain from the dogs so struck. (Chapter 9 Page 110)

For a moment he was paralyzed.  The unknown lurking in the midst of the sticks and moss, was savagely clutching him by the nose.  He scrambled backward, bursting out in an astonished explosion of ki-yi's.  At the sound, Kiche leaped snarling the the end of her stick, and there raged terribly because she could not come to his aid.  But Gray Beaver laughed loudly, and slapped his thighs, and told the happening to all the rest of the camp till everybody was laughing uproariously. (Chapter 9 Page 116)

They surrounded the cub and laughed at him, while he wailed out his terror and his hurt.  In the midst of it, he heard something.  The Indians heard it, too.  But the cub knew what it was, and with a last, long wail that had in it more of triumph than grief, he ceases his noise and waited for the coming of his mother, of his ferocious and indomitable mother who fought and killed all things and was never afraid.  She had heard the cry of her cub and was dashing to save him.  She bounded in amongst them, her anxious and militant motherhood making her anything but a pretty sight.  But to the cub the spectacle of her protective rage was pleasing.  He uttered a glad little cry and bounded to meet her, while the man-animals went back hastily several steps. (Chapter 8 Page 106)

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2 years ago
0

this tack is 👍

2 years ago
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Both the pictures and passage are very detailed.

2 years ago
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I enjoy the passages, but it seems to me that you bolded adjectives, not imagery.

2 years ago
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🗿🗿🗿🗿

2 years ago
0

The 5th passage had a lot of strong imagery. Good job 👍

2 years ago
0

Awesome tackk! Good job!

2 years ago
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2 years ago
0

I would have to disagree with you nick... I thought claires was perf 😄

2 years ago
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🌚😘😘😘

2 years ago
0

i liked the third one