About Dyspraxia

Sierra Brown

Dyspraxia is a developmental coordination disorder (DCD).

-Very common but often unheard of
-Affects a child's ability to do a wide range of everyday activities such as:
    -Jumping
    -Speaking Clearly
    -Gripping a pencil

Dyspraxia is not a sign of weakness or low intelligence
-Brain based condition that makes it hard to plan and coordinate physical movement
-Children with dyspraxia tend to struggle with bad posture and balance. They often tend to appear out of sync or clumsy.
-Also affects fine motor skills, including hand movements needed to write clearly and mouth and tongue movements needed to pronounce words correctly.

Dyspraxia can affect social skills. Children with dyspraxia may behave immaturely even though they typically have average or above-average intelligence.

Kids do not outgrow dyspraxia. Occupational, physical, and speech therapy can help kids learn to work around areas of weakness and build on their strengths.

Dyspraxia can affect:

-Communication
-Emotional/Behavioral Skills
-Academics
-Overall Life Skills

Roughly 6-10 percent of children show some signs of dyspraxia. Boys are affected more often than girls.

The cause of dyspraxia is not yet know. Many believe genetics play a role. Some scientists suspect dyspraxia may be caused by a problem with the nerve cells that send signals from the brain muscles.

Kids with dyspraxia often have difficulty writing quickly. This can create a number of classroom challenges, such as trouble taking notes and finishing tests. Children who have speech difficulties also may have difficulty with reading and spelling

Types of Dyspraxia

There are 4 kinds of Dyspraxia:

-Ideomotor: Makes it hard to complete single-step motor tasks such as combing hair and waving goodbye.
-Ideational dyspraxia: Makes it more difficult to perform a sequence of movements, like brushing teeth or making a bed.
-Oromotor dyspraxia: Makes it difficult to coordinate muscle movements needed to pronounce words.
-Constructional dyspraxia: Makes it harder to understand spatial relationships.

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