THE STATE OF VIRGINIA

POPULATION
8,326,289

STATE FLAG

The state flag of Virginia has a deep blue field with a circle of white in the center on both sides of the flag. In this white circle the coat of arms of the state is painted or embroidered.

STATE FLOWER
DOGWOOD BLOOM

Virginia designated the flowering dogwood as the official state floral emblem in 1918 (also Virginia's state tree, adopted in 1956). The dogwood is a small, deciduous tree with graceful branches that bloom in spring with large showy flowers (usually greenish-white, sometimes pink or yellow). The dogwood develops red berries in autumn, and the leaves also turn a deep red before falling for winter.

STATE BIRD
CARDINAL

Virginia designated the northern cardinal as official state bird in 1950. One of America's favorite backyard birds, cardinals are distinctive in appearance and song - known for their "cheer cheer cheer," "whit-chew whit-chew" and "purty purty purty" whistles.

Male cardinals are a brilliant scarlet red, females a buffy brown with reddish wings - both have a jet-black mask, pronounced crest, and heavy bill. The cardinal sings nearly year-round, and the male aggressively defends his 4-acre territory (male cardinals have been seen attacking small red objects mistaken as other males).

Northern cardinals breed 2-3 times each season. The female builds the nest and tends the hatchlings for about 10 days while the male brings food. The male then takes over the care of this first brood while the female moves on to a new nest and lays a second clutch of eggs.

The cardinal is the state bird of 7 states: Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, North Carolina, Ohio, Virginia, and West Virginia.

STATE TREE
DOGWOOD

Virginia designated the flowering dogwood as the official state floral emblem in 1918. The dogwood is a small, deciduous tree with graceful branches that bloom in spring with large showy flowers (usually greenish-white, sometimes pink or yellow). The dogwood develops red berries in autumn, and the leaves also turn a deep red before falling for winter.

The word dogwood stems from dagwood (from the use of the very hard wood for making 'dags,' or daggers). The wood was also valued for making loom shuttles, arrows, tool handles, and other small items that required a very hard, strong wood. Larger items were also made of dogwood such as the screw in basket-style wine or fruit presses.

THINGS TO DO

Walk in the footsteps of Captain John Smith and Pocahontas at Historic Jamestowne. Explore the site of the first permanent colony in North America and watch archaeologists uncover the remains of the 1607 James Fort and explore what they’re digging this season. At Historic Jamestown, you can take an archaeology walking tour, view artifacts unearthed at the fort site at the Archaearium, attend special programs and events and enjoy lunch by the James River at the on-site café.

Monticello was the primary plantation of Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States, who, after inheriting quite a large amount of land from his father, started building Monticello when he was 26 years old.

George Washington's Mount Vernon is located about 15 miles south of Washington DC along the banks of the Potomac River. The historic estate includes not only the Mount Vernon Mansion - George and Martha Washington's home - but also a host of colonial era buildings, beautiful gardens, a working distillery and gristmill, and our museum and education center. There's so much more to see here.