My Journal

By: Margaret Allen

Entry 1

April 10, 1861

Dear Journal,

My name is Margret Allen. Recently I have become involved in the Civil War and am writing about my experiences. It all started when my husband Samuel came home from work. I had spent the day with my mother. She is very ill and is not going to get better any time soon. When I came home I started cooking dinner like every other night and prepared the house for when Samuel came home. Usually when he comes home we talk about his day at work-he works at a big cotton company- and eat our food. Tonight was different however. Tonight he told me about a war that was starting to break out. I knew that people were talking about the idea of a war but I never considered the idea. He told me about the cruelties of slavery and how it was a cause worth fighting for. I decided that I wanted to get involved. I know that girls can't fight of course, but there had to be someway I could help end slavery. Where I live in Philadelphia some woman were talking about helping the Union win the war. I immediately knew that I wanted to help too and so together we formed a plan. Together we would all be spies delivering messages to the Union generals giving them crucial information to help them win the war. There are infinite possibilities in ways we could help whether it be passing a note by hiding it under our skirts, or hanging laundry to form a secret code. No matter what it is I am determined to help win this war.  

Entry 2

April 14, 1861

A:Hi possum, you’re fit as a fiddle
B: Just toeing the mark. Got anything to pass on?

A:I have this note, but it will look like greenbacks. You’ll have to give em’ to the skunks.

B:It might have hard knocks and played out a lot by the time we get there but I’ll make sure they get it by the end of the week.

A:Make sure that you don’t become a jailbird.

B: Don’t worry I’m a hard case but I better skedaddle pretty soon.

A:I better too. I’ll be top rail with this note.

B:I’ll be sure to get it to the Yankees before the Greybacks can even find out anything

A:Hunkey dorey, I’ll see you at the end of the week.

B:Great! I’ll see if I can bring you back some Goobers

A: Good luck

B: Goodbye

Entry 3

April 22, 1861

Dear Samuel,

I was walking on a path through some woods one day minding my own business with a note tucked up in my skirts. I knew I was almost to the Union camp, but I had never bothered looking or listening for any action going on around the camp. But then yesterday I heard something that made me turn my head. I turned around and went to the edge of the bluffs, and sure enough there was the union camp right in front of me by about a mile. Of course I knew that there was a new General (General McClellan)  from the note I had to pass to him but I wasn't sure what I had to do. All the men were in rows and rows holding their muskets and following some orders. From the stance they had one could tell they had been doing this most of the day. Can you imagine? Hours and hours just doing the same drill after drill? But then without any break the men went straight to doing their chores. And hard ones too. Many were digging through the rocks to create some sort of trench. But aside from the noises from the chores, you could hear... laughter. One man had refused to go do his chores. His body was inside a barrel with only his legs arms and legs visible. What humiliation! Well I imagine I'll be getting to the camp sometime tomorrow and maybe I'll get to see some of the action up close even!

Best wishes,

Margaret

Entry 4

Names: Lucy Abrahamson, Akul Joshi, Kaleigh Mills

Interview

Q: Jeremiah, when you chose to stay home with your mom what caused you to make that choice?

A: At the time my mother was very ill and I didn't want her to feel alone during her worst time. Also I didn't believe in fighting to keep slavery with the Confederacy.

Q: What are you proud or happy about?

A: After my mother passed away I was determined to join the arm and I am proud of myself for joining the Union army.

Q: What do you regret?

A: Sometimes I wish that I had traveled west to battle Lee's army instead of west and to the south. If I had done that maybe I wouldn't have been captured or maybe even injured.

Q: Jeremiah, How bad is your injury?

A: I will survive, but I will have to walk with a cane from now on. I got shot with a mini ball in my leg, but luckily no s=damage was done to the bone. I will be able to live but I will not be able to fully be myself.

Entry 5

Song

One arm, one leg, one mind, one man

We must all fight as one

One thought one action, one word

We must all fight as one

The time has come no more to waste

Lets fall in line and come together this day

The flag flies high all where all men lie

Loading their guns for freedom

The bullets whiz by and men will die

This is the price of freedom

One minute one hour one day at a time

When will all of our times come?

A shout a holler a whisper then silence

When will all of our times come?

The time has come no more to waste

Lets fall in line and come together this day

The flag flies high all where all men lie

Loading their guns for freedom

The bullets whiz by and men will die

This is the price of freedom

We must go marching on and on

We must be quick

We must be smart

We must be strong to survive.

Lets fall in line and come together this day

The flag flies high all where all men lie

Loading their guns for freedom

The bullets whiz by and men will die

This is the price of freedom

Entry 6

Food and Fun

Dear Journal,

Today while I was walking through camp trying to find a Union General, I noticed some things about the camp. Well, more about the soldiers. They had the most unusual ways of occupying themselves. They would be gambling, or playing cards. That's what most did. Others were reading the bible, singing songs, or putting on some drama production. Wouldn't you get bored doing the same thing day after day? I would and I imagine most of the soldiers did also. Some men were betting on some event that was quite strange, though I do not know what they were doing other than racing some sort of bug! I bet most of the men were no heather than the bugs they were racing either based on the food they were racing. The beef was raw, the water dirty, and the bread moldy and stale. The corn bread look horrifying! I grew up eating corn bread, and if anyone knows how to make it it should be me! Ingredients

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted, plus butter for baking dish
1 cup cornmeal
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
1 1/2 cups buttermilk
Directions
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Lightly grease an 8-inch baking dish.

In a large bowl, mix together the cornmeal, flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.

In a separate bowl, mix together the eggs, buttermilk, and butter. Pour the buttermilk mixture into the cornmeal mixture and fold together until there are no dry spots (the batter will still be lumpy). Pour the batter into the prepared baking dish.

Bake until the top is golden brown and tester inserted into the middle of the corn bread comes out clean, about 20 to 25 minutes. Remove the cornbread from the oven and let it cool for 10 minutes before serving.

That is how you are supposed to make it but by the looks of it, they spent no more then 10 minutes on it! Poor soldiers!

Journal Entry 7 (sickness)

Dear Journal,

I was forced to stay in camp today because the conditions were unsafe for traveling in. Battle is soon going to break out, but I heard it is not the battle that kills soldiers the most. Today I befriended two nurses; Elizabeth, and Charlotte. It is the diseases, and they know first hand. I was talking to them after the rain from this morning had passed, and I didn't realize how much disease affects the war. They say that dehydration and starvation are major causes for soldiers to become ill as is the unsanitary conditions. Soldiers become weak and helpless as they lie in their stretchers, and I should know because I saw them. Some were stricken with pneumonia or fever. Others with dysentery. It hurt my heart to see soldiers in such condition, but the nurses said that there is not much one can do. So I now know that most of the soldiers who perished were not wounded at all; on the outside anyway. The real cause of their deaths was all in the illness.

Journal Entry 8

Dear Samuel,

I know that you have recently been drafted into the war. I am on my way back home now and should arrive in about a week's time. I know that I must stay home now to take care of everything while you are fighting in the war. I hope I have helped in this war even ever so slightly, but nothing I can do could ever compare to what you are about to embark on. I have seen the camps first hand, and so I know what is to expect. I know that you can handle whatever is thrown your way during this war so I won't worry about you. I know that one day you will come home to me, and we will continue our lives the way we left them. For the war cannot last forever. I must force myself to expect the worse though, so if you perish during a heroic battle then I will have to wait until we are united again. When the moon is high in the sky shining bright, that is when I will think of you the most.

Best wishes and all my thoughts,

Margaret

CITATIONS


Daniels, Dick. "Cardinals of the World." Birds of the World. Dick Damiels, n.d.
Web. <http://carolinabirds.org/HTML/WLD_Cardinal.htm>.

Haynes, Mark. "Civil War Emancipation at Fort Defiance." Clarksville Online.
Clarksville Tennessee, n.d. Web. 6 May 2014.
<http://www.clarksvilleonline.com/2008/06/08/
civil-war-encampment-at-fort-defiance/>.

Peters, Jones Beneth. "For the Love of a Swirly Dress." One Bright Corner. N.p.,
n.d. Web. 5 Mar. 2010. <http://onebrightcorner.blogspot.com/2010/03/
for-love-of-swirly-dress.html>.


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