Mobile Apps!

Here are five mobile apps that could be used in a Secondary School setting!

Wikipanion

Wikipanion is a mobile app that allows users to search Wikipedia fast and efficiently.

EXAMPLE: Lets say a student is thinking about what topic to do a presentation on for his science class on the bus ride home from school. She could simply read up on topics that interest her with Wikipanion, and have her topic picked by the time she gets home!

Graphing Calculator App

There are many different graphing calculator apps and they allow students with mobile devices to use those devices in lieu of a large, expensive graphing calculator.

EXAMPLE: A student is working on some homework, but they forgot their graphing calculator in their locker at school. The student is no longer left high-and-dry if they don't have their graphic calculator on them at all times.

Convertpad

Convertpad is an application that allows you to convert from one unit to another. Units could be area, length, velocity, torque, temperature, enthalpy, density, etc...

EXAMPLE: For extra practice for a chemistry class, a teacher posts questions from an American chemistry class. Students must now convert temperatures from degrees Fahrenheit to degrees Celcius or Kelvin. The student uses the Convertpad app to convert between temperatures easily.

CamScanner App

CamScanner allows you to take a picture, and converts that picture into a pdf file.

EXAMPLE: A student finishes a hard problem from his math homework and wants to put it up on the class website. She takes a picture of her solution with CamScanner, and adds the subsequent pdf to her class website for other students who may be struggling with the problem.

Merriam-Webster Dictionary App

Merriam-Webster Dictionary App lets you search definitions and spelling of terms you may not know.

EXAMPLE: Two students are taking the bus home and talking about a Social Studies class they had recently. They are both confused a word their teacher used multiple times in their class so they decide to look it up on their Dictionary app.

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