Bottle Rocket

1. Our task was to make and build a bottle rocket

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3. Research and Generating Ideas

In the space below, document your research. Be sure to include proper citations at the end of your notes.

Notes: Rockets were used in many things such as war, fireworks, and even making it to the moon. Rockets were used in planes to make them go much faster. The rocket is an amazing item that took many thousands of years to perfect. Many things went into the rocket to make it work, you had to look at the drag on the rocket, lift, thrust, weight, and stability. All of these are significant to know so that your rocket can function properly. The design of your rocket is everything, you have to make it the best you can in order for it to fly up straight.

The Diagram above shows all the parts of the rocket so that you know what is most important, everything labeled on the rocket needs to be made correctly for the rocket to fly straight. Thrust is important because it propels the rocket upward. Drag and Lift are the center of pressure. Thrust and Weight are the center of gravity. Roll is the twisting motion of the rocket. Pitch is the up and down movement of the rocket. Lift and drag are mechanical forces. Gravitational force is a field force. mass = density x volume. Weight is one of the three forces on a rocket seen in the rocket image below. Weight is the force generated on the rocket by the gravitational attraction of the earth. It is the combined mass of the rocket itself, including the fuel, and the payload, multiplied by the gravitational pull from earth. As shown in the rocket image below, weight opposes thrust - one of the other forces of flight. Weight pulls vertically downward through the rocket's center of gravity (CG).

Weight: One of the three forces on a rocket seen in the rocket image below. Weight is the force generated on the rocket by the gravitational attraction of the earth. It is the combined mass of the rocket itself, including the fuel, and the payload, multiplied by the gravitational pull from earth. As shown in the rocket image below, weight opposes thrust - one of the other forces of flight. Weight pulls vertically downward through the rocket's center of gravity (CG). Center of gravity will be explained in more detail in the stability section.weight = mass x gravity




Thrust: A force that produces lift-off, or upward movement of a rocket. Thrust acts through the center of gravity and must exceed weight in order to move the rocket off of the launch pad. momentum-water = masswater x velocitywater

Drag: Drag occurs when a solid object moves through a gas or liquid. When you stand in high winds, you can feel the pressure of the wind on your body. When wind speed increases, the pressure increases and this produces a force that resists forward motion. This force is drag. The force of drag acts through the Center of Pressure (CP) of the rocket. Center of Pressure will be explained in more detail in the stability section. A rocket's drag can be affected by the rocket's frontal area, shape, velocity, and air density.Drag = .5 x air density x velocity2 x frontal area x coefficient of drag

Stability: It is important for a rocket to have and maintain stable flight. In order to maintain stable flight, rotation around all three axes - especially yaw and pitch - must be prevented. The reason controlling rotation is more important around the yaw and pitch axes is because instability about these axes would change the intended flight path. If the rocket was to rotate around the roll axis the flight path would not necessarily change. In order to understand rocket stability you must first learn about two very important points on the rocket. These two points are the center of gravity (CG) and center of pressure (CP).

Recovery: part of the rocket that allows the rocket to safely return to earth after launch. There are many different types of recovery systems, but we will focus on the types available in the Rockets 2.0 application: Standard or "Lawn-dart", tumble, backslider, and a parachute. The parachute is an active recovery system, and the others are all considered passive recovery systems. The standard (lawn-dart), tumble, and backslider recovery systems are considered passive designs because the rocket's return to earth is largely based on the same principles of stability that took the rocket upwards. In other words, there is no system that "kicks in" at the right time to safely bring the rocket back to earth. So to understand how these passive recovery systems work, we need to consider each in the context of stability - specifically the static margin

Center of Gravity: Balancing point of the rocket.



Citations/References: White box Learning

4. Identifying criteria and specifying constraints

What are the criteria and constraints?

Constraints would be the weight, materials, and cost.

Criteria is that a bottle rocket needs to be built in order to fly straight with good stability. The parachute will need to deploy in order for the rocket to fall safely

5. Exploring possibilities

I would need to build my rocket as light as possible. I would need to be able to Make it to the exact size in order to make it function properly

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9. We only tested 1 time, that was also our final and only launch of the rocket. Mine did pretty well, put i got water on the cone of my rocket and is destroyed the paper. So my parachute was unable to come out.

10. Honestly I really liked my design and thought it was really good, i'm not sure but i think that the parachute would have deployed if it wasn't for my carelessness.

11. Absolutely, I would make the rocket much more stable and secure in order to make mass production of the rocket. Installing a fuel module as well so the it would propel the rocket further.

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