Insane Asylums (1830s-1850s)

Please RSVP
8 people are going
Invite Friends
8 going0 maybe3 no
henrik_olsson 2 years ago
K 2 years ago
margy 2 years ago
Hannah 2 years ago
Nickyx98 2 years ago
Anna (+1) 2 years ago

Natalia is coming with! Let's get crazy!

Kbash Organizer
ZoeCook 2 years ago
hans9597 2 years ago
TikTackk 2 years ago

Comment Stream

2 years ago
0

Dorothea Dix pushed for prison and asylum reform before the Massachusetts Legislature, emphasizing the conditions of the insane in prison, and encouraging the construction of insane asylums to better rehabilitate the mentally ill. She made her case for self-supported care, helping establish five hospitals in America. In 1841, Eastern Lunatic Asylum was created as the first publicly supported psychiatric hospital. Dr. Halt, the superintendent of the hospital, had revolutionary ideas about treating the mentally insane, including the usage of talk therapy, drugs and outplacement.

2 years ago
0
2 years ago
0

This was one of the modes of treatment for people who were thought to be insane. It's an example of inhumane treatment, Dorothea Dix believed to be wrong.

2 years ago
0
2 years ago
0

Another example of treatment for insane

2 years ago
0

An excerpt of Dorothea Dix's plead for a state mental hospital:

"Moral treatment of the insane with a view to induce habits of self-control, is of the first importance. Uniform firmness and kindness towards the patient are of absolute obligation. The most exact observance of truth should be preserved in all intercourse with the insane. They rarely violate a promise, and are singularly sensitive to truthfulness and fidelity in others. They rarely forgive an injury and as seldom betray insensibility to kindness and indulgence. Once deceived by a nurse or attendant they never a second time bestow their confidence upon the same individual.
Moderate employment, moderate exercise, as much freedom as is consistent with the safety of the patient, and as little apparent anxious watchfulness with cheerful society should be sought. The condition of the patients must determine the number of nurses in a ward. The general opinion is holden that all patients do better without special nurses, wholly devoted to their care.
“The proper mental and physical employment of the insane,” says Dr. Kirkbride, “is of so much importance that the full treatment of this subject would be to give at once a treatise on the insane and on insanity. Whatever it maybe, it must embrace utility, and it is well to combine both physical and mental occupation. Active exercise in the open air, moderate labor in the gardens, pleasure grounds, or upon the farm, afford good results. Short excursions, resort to the work shops, carpentering, joining turning, the use of a good library&c.,&c., are aids in advancing the cure of the patient.” Sedentary employments are not in general favorable to health. The operations of agriculture seem liable to the least objection. There is a limit to be observed in the use of labor as a moral means; for there are always some patients to whom it is decidedly injurious. This effect is manifested oftenest in recent cases.
Dr. Ray says that it is an error to suppose that the insane can labor as productively and as uniformly as the sane man. The working hours of a patient should seldom exceed six or seven per diem, and not seldom work is altogether intermitted.
The manner in which labor exerts a beneficial influence upon the insane mind differs no doubt in different forms of the disease. In highly excited patients the surplus nervous energy will be consumed, if no other way is provided, in mischief and noise; but let it be expended in useful labor, and although the work may not always be perfectly well done yet the patient thinks it is, and experiences the gratification of having done what he believes is a good thing, and consequently, so far as it goes it is beneficial."

2 years ago
0

Explanation: The second that Dorothea Dix saw that poor mentally ill woman being abused was the day that insane asylums changed for the better. Not only did she push for a cause without many to back her up, she is a clear example of the few women who pushed for radical reforms. Dix had also established a reputation as an advocate for the work of female nurses. She created the first coming/generation of American mental asylums and changed the way we treat insane patients forever. The mentally I'll used to be housed in jails with criminals, kept in cages, and put in inhumane environments. Dorothea discovered that with proper care some of these mental illness could plateau or even get better! In 1854 a bill passed to commission five million acres of land for the mentally ill and was approved by both houses but was vetoed by President Franklin Pierce. A women making this sort of public request was way ahead of her time. Dorothea Dix has been described as "the most effective advocate of humanitarian reform in American mental institutions during the nineteenth century" (Goldenson, 1970).