Comment Stream

2 years ago
0

Explain the ideas of consent of the governed and unalienable rights?


The idea for unalienable rights is that every one in america (supposedly) has obvious rights given to them by god such as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.
The consent of the governed is that if the government ever takes away any of these basic rights, we are allowed to overthrow it.

Why does a just government need the consent of the governed?

It is needed as a sort of reminder, that the government is supposed to protect these unalienable rights for everyone, and the minute they try to turn back around and disrespect such rule, the citizens have the power to overthrow them.

Who is responsible for protecting or guaranteeing our unalienable rights?

The government is supposed to do so in the first place, but it is really the job of the people to make sure this happens if they want it, and keep our government in check.

Are the principles of unalienable rights and government by consent in the Declaration outdated, or are they still true today?

2 years ago
0

I think these principles are still true today and semi- protected, but I'm sure there are plenty exceptions to such rights today.

2 years ago
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Do these principles matter to you, if so how and why?

2 years ago
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They matter very much to me. I'm sure they would matter to anyone else too because if these basic rights were taken away, I'm sure it would effect anyone. If suddenly everyones freedom, life and happiness was taken away, I would not be able to stand it. These principles mean enough to me to give up everything to get them. I believe everyone should have at least the basic rights held in the declaration and more. Thats why it matters to me.