Bottle Rocket Project

By Matthew Trivette

. Define the Problem

What need or want must be met by the solution?

To see how high you can make a rocket go made out of a two liter bottle

2. Brainstorming

In the space provided, sketch three possible solutions to the given problem. Remember to be creative!

3. Research and Generating Ideas

In the space below, document your research. Be sure to include proper citations at the end of your notes.

Newton’s laws of Motion

  1. Every object persists in its state of rest or uniform motion in a straight line unless it is compelled to change that state by forces impressed on it.
  2. Force is equal to the change in momentum (mV) per change in time. For a constant mass, force equals mass times acceleration (F=ma)
  3. For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.

Thrust acts through the center of gravity, and if it can overcome the force of weight will make the rocket go forward

Weight affects how fast your rocket falls down Weight = mass x gravity

Drag happens when something solid passes through a gas or liquid.

Roll is a twisting motion about the roll axis. Roll movement isn’t a problem in a water rocket since it doesn’t change the path of your rocket

Pitch refers to an up and down movement of the rocket's nose

Yaw refers to the side to side movement of the rocket's nose

Recovery is the parachute that comes out so it doesn’t crash and burn

4. Identifying criteria and specifying constraints

What are the criteria and constraints?

Allowable

Allowed

Designed

Parachute Recovery

Yes

Yes

Bottle Size

20oz, 1L, 2L

2L

Rocket Design Inputs

Minimum

Maximum

Designed

Air Pressure

--

70 psi

70.0 psi

Nose Length

--

228 mm

211.0 mm

Number of Fins

--

4

4

Parachute Size

--

279.4 mm

279.4 mm

Fin/Launcher Interference

PASS

Fin Validation

PASS

Parachute Deploy Status

PASS

Budget

Minimum

Maximum

Designed

Design Cost

--

$ 6.00

$ 3.50

Materials List

2L bottle

Parachute

Clay ball

Bt50 tube

Balsa wood

5. Exploring possibilities

Reflect on your brainstorm ideas and research notes. Generate any additional designs which you feel meet the criteria and constraints in the space below.

My best design was my first one because I didn’t want the other ones to look the same and I couldn’t find a better design for what I was trying to do with my rocket.

6. Selecting an Approach

a. Enter the constraints of the project in the first column.

b. Score each sketch for each constraint. + = 3 pts., =2 pts., - = 1 pt. c. Total the columns and circle the highest score.

Constraint

Sketch 1

Sketch 2

Sketch 3

Cost

3

2

2

Nose length

3

3

2

weight

3

2

3

Static margin

2

3

2

Drag

3

2

2

Total

14

12

11

7. Developing a Design Proposal

Take your highest scoring sketch and create working drawings (sketches with dimensions, so that you could build your project). Attach your working drawing

8. Making a model or prototype

In the space below, document (using digital pictures) your construction of the model/prototype. Be sure to include a picture of the final model/prototype.

9. Testing and Evaluating the Design, using specifications

As you create your solution, you will perform tests to make sure that the solution is meeting the needs of the given problem. If you solution does not work, you may need to repeat the previous steps of the Engineering Design Process, until you find a functional design. In the space below, document the type of test you conducted and the results.

Test Performed: a launch

Test Results: were horrible 1 second maybe

10.Refining the Design

Based on your tests, propose refinements to the design and construction of the design problem in the space below.

11. Creating or Making It

If time allows, modify your model/prototype as proposed in refining the design. What additional steps would be necessary to produce this solution for mass market production? we didn't refine them

12.Communicating processes and results

Present your completed design portfolio as an oral presentation to the class.

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