Geographic Map of Chechnya

Chechnya

         Chechnya is an area of extreme conflict due to its problems with Russia and developing its independence. Today, Chechnya is known as the Chechen Republic and is a federal subject of Russia because of the issues that began in 1785 in early territories. The Russia Empire aimed to increase territory by expanding to surrounding lands, such as Caucasus (where Chechnya is located). As Russia strived for power, Chechnya developed serious problems with the Russian government. Chechnya wanted independence from Russia and eventually achieved it. The tensions between Russia and Chechnya only grew over time. The conflicts still continue today as numerous wars between the two parties took place. Around 1785 as Chechnya developed issues with Russia, Chechen people started to revolt against Russian government by proclaiming Islamic practices. These Islamic practices were peaceful, yet seen as a threat to Russia. Russia and Chechnya had many disputes over time. However, if Chechnya continues to confront the Russian authority with peace instead of violence, then eventually these two opponents could establish a civil relationship.

"Chechen–Russian Conflict." - Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 May     2015.

Chechnya V. Russia
            
           In the article, "Putin Critics Said To Be On Russian 'Kill List'", by Rachel Martin, she describes a recent issue between Chechnya and Russia. Russia's president, President Vladimir Putin, was murdered in Moscow and there continues to be many speculations to which opposing members could have been behind the attack. Many suspects have been named, but most arrests have occurred in the area of Chechnya. Although Russia lacks evidence, they assume Chechen involvement because of the major problems between the two opposing areas. Russia's distrust in Chechnya and its citizens display the continuous conflicts that has occurred throughout time for both these places.

Martin, Rachel. "Putin Critics Said To Be On Russian 'Kill List'" NPR. NPR, 22 Mar.                         2015. Web. 05 May 2015.

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