Florence Nightingale

By:Landon B.

Introduction

“To be a good nurse, one has to be a good person,” Florence Nightingale. That is the best quote that explains Florence Nightingale’s life. Do you ever feel sick and need help getting better? Well Florence would be the person to ask for help. She is very caring and helpful to all especially sick. I would nominate Florence Nightingale for the Nobel Peace Prize in the category of medicine because she did something big with her impact on hospitals. She trained nurses and helped make the hospitals more sanitary which saved a lot of lives.




Florence Nightingale was born on May 12, 1820 near London, England. Her parents named her after Florence, Italy and she was educated at home because her parents didn’t want her to go away to school. She was expected to get married and have children, but she didn’t want to live as a cultured woman. She felt that God wanted her to be a nurse. She studied how to be a nurse secretly without her parents knowing. She never got to visit a hospital, because her parents would not allow her.



Florence remained unmarried to follow God's purpose for her future and she did become a nurse. There was nobody to take care of hurt soldiers, so she did it herself. Every day more soldiers from the Crimean War arrived injured. She organized a team of 38 nurses to travel to Turkey. Florence opened a nursing school in London after the Crimean War ended. Florence often worked 20 hours a day where she cooked, talked, bathed, and comforted patients in the hospital. She tried to make a better life for soldiers. The soldiers began calling her the “Lady with the Lamp” because she worked late into the night.



Florence became the head nurse and kept the hospital very clean. She began a long association with St. Thomas’s Hospital in 1860. Florence was very strict and nurses were asked to quit their job because of illness, disobedience and drunkenness. She talked and wrote letters to powerful people about improving hospitals around the world. Florence wrote books about nursing, how hospitals work, and the need to keep hospitals clean and free from germs. She set standards of health cleanliness in hospitals that nurses follow today.



Sidney Herbert helped Florence open the Nightingale Training School. In 1851, the average age of nurses was between 50 and 60 but by 1860, Nightingale Training School had young woman nurses.



Florence helped out the sick and poor. She was brave to go into hospitals with sick people in them. She secretly studied nursing without her family knowing and she helped save the lives of many people. For those reasons I nominate Florence Nightingale for the Nobel Peace Prize in the category of medicine.






Works Cited

Armentrout, David, and Patricia Armentrout. Florence Nightingale. Vero Beach, FL: Rourke Pub., 2002. Print. Citation 2

Hinman, Bonnie. Florence Nightingale and the Advancement of Nursing. Hockessin, DE: Mitchell Lane, 2005. Print. Citation 4

Malam, John. Florence Nightingale. Chicago: Heinemann Library, 2001. Print. Citation 1

Mosher, Kiki. Learning about Compassion from the Life of Florence Nightingale. New York: Rosen/PowerKids, 1996. Print. Citation 3

Ridley, Sarah. Florence Nightingale-- and a New Age of Nursing. Mankato, MN: Sea-to-Sea Publications, 2013. Print.

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