the holocaust

killing centers

Between 1933 and 1945, Nazi Germany established about 20,000 camps to imprison its many millions of victims. These camps were used for several reasons, forced labor camps, and killing centers primarily built for mass murder, were just a couple. . From its rise to power in 1933, the Nazi regime built a series of detention facilities to imprison and eliminate so-called "enemies of the state." Most prisoners in the early concentration camps were German communists,socialist, social democrats, Roma (gypsies), Jehovah's witnesses, homosexuals, and people accused  of "asocial" or socially deviant behavior.These facilities were called “concentration camps” because those imprisoned there were physically “concentrated” in one location.After Germany's annexation of Austria in March 1938, the Nazis arrested German and Austrian Jews and imprisoned them in the Dachau, Buchenwald, andSachsenhausen concentration camps, all located in Germany. After the violent Kristallnacht ("Night of Broken Glass") pogroms in November 1938, the Nazis conducted mass arrests of adult male Jews and incarcerated them in camps for brief periods.The Nazis constructed gas chambers (rooms that filled with poison gas to kill those inside) to increase killing efficiency and to make the process more impersonal for the perpetrators. At the Auschwitz camp complex, the Birkenau killing center had four gas chambers. During the height of deportations to the camp, up to 6,000 Jews were gassed there each day.  Millions of people were imprisoned and abused in the various types of Nazi camps.Only a small fraction of those imprisoned in Nazi camps survived.

צעדות מוות
"death Marches"

The SS guards had strict orders to kill prisoners who could no longer walk or travel. As evacuations depended increasingly on forced marches and travel by open rail car or small craft in the Baltic Sea in the brutal winter of 1944-1945, the number who died of exhaustion and exposure along the routes increased dramatically. This encouraged an understandable perception among the prisoners that the Germans intended them all to die on the march. The term death march was probably coined by concentration camp prisoners.During the death marches, the SS guards brutally mistreated the prisoners.Following their explicit orders, they shot hundreds of prisoners who collapsed or could not keep pace on the march, or who could no longer disembark from the trains or ships.Thousands of prisoners died of exposure, starvation, and exhaustion. Forced marches were especially common in late 1944 and 1945, as the SS evacuated prisoners to camps deeper within Germany.As Allied forces advanced into the heart of Germany they liberated hundreds of thousands of concentration camp prisoners.

the early years of Adolf Hitler.

Born in Austria in 1889, 5. Dictator Adolf Hitler was born in Branau am Inn, Austria, on April 20, 1889, and was the fourth of six children born to Alois Hitler and Klara Polzl. When Hitler was 3 years old, the family moved from Austria to Germany. As a child, Hitler clashed frequently with his father. Following the death of his younger brother, Edmund, in 1900, he became detached and introverted. His father did not approve of his interest in fine art rather than business. In addition to art, Hitler showed an early interest in German nationalism, rejecting the authority of Austria-Hungary. This nationalism would become the motivating force of Hitler's life. His father died suddenly in 1903, only three years after his brother. Following the death of his father and brother, Hitler moved to Vienna and worked as a casual laborer and a watercolor painter. Hitler applied to the Academy of Fine Arts twice, and was rejected both times. Out of money, he moved into a homeless shelter, where he remained for several years.

cited:

  • Website Title: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
  • Article Title: Death Marches
  • Publisher: United States Holocaust Memorial Council
  • Electronically Published: June 20, 2014
  • Date Accessed: January 15, 2015
  • Website Title: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
  • Article Title: Adolf Hitler: Early Years, 1889–1913
  • Publisher: United States Holocaust Memorial Council
  • Electronically Published: June 20, 2014
  • Date Accessed: January 13, 2015
  • Website Title: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
  • Article Title: Nazi Camps
  • Publisher: United States Holocaust Memorial Council
  • Electronically Published: June 20, 2014
  • Date Accessed: January 15, 2015
  • Website Title: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
  • Publisher: United States Holocaust Memorial Council
  • Date Accessed: January 16, 2015

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