Powerful EMDR Therapy

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a psychotherapy treatment that was originally designed to alleviate the distress associated with traumatic memories. Shapiro’s Adaptive Information Processing model posits that EMDR facilitates the accessing and processing of traumatic memories and other adverse life experience to bring these to an adaptive resolution.

After successful treatment with EMDR, affective distress is relieved, negative beliefs are reformulated, and physiological arousal is reduced. During EMDR therapy the client attends to emotionally disturbing material in brief sequential doses while simultaneously focusing on an external stimulus. Therapist directed lateral eye movements are the most commonly used external stimulus but a variety of other stimuli including hand-tapping and audio stimulation are often used.

Shapiro hypothesizes that EMDR facilitates the accessing of the traumatic memory network, so that information processing is enhanced, with new associations forged between the traumatic memory and more adaptive memories or information. These new associations are thought to result in complete information processing, new learning, elimination of emotional distress, and development of cognitive insights. . EMDR therapy is available to the public. EMDR therapy uses a three pronged protocol the past events that have laid the groundwork for dysfunction are processed, forging new associative links with adaptive information; the current circumstances that elicit distress are targeted, and internal and external triggers are desensitized; imaginable templates of future events are incorporated, to assist the client in acquiring the skills needed for adaptive functioning.

When a person is involved in a distressing event, they may feel overwhelmed and their brain may be unable to process the information like a normal memory. The upsetting memory appears to wind up solidified on a neurological level.

At the point when a man reviews the troubling memory, the individual can re-experience what they saw, listened, noticed, tasted or felt, and this can be very exceptional. Now and again the recollections are so upsetting; the individual tries to abstain from contemplating the troubling occasion to abstain from encountering the upsetting emotions.

Some find that the distressing memories come to mind when something reminds them of the distressing event, or sometimes the memories just seem to just pop into mind. The alternating left-right stimulation of the brain with eye movements, sounds or taps during EMDR, seems to stimulate the frozen or blocked information processing system.

In the process the distressing memories seem to lose their intensity, so that the memories are less distressing and seem more like 'ordinary' memories. The effect is believed to be similar to that which occurs naturally during REM sleep when your eyes rapidly move from side to side. EMDR therapy helps reduce the distress of all the different kinds of memories, whether it was what you saw, heard, smelt, tasted, felt or thought.