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Our vegetable garden
Close up of one vegetable bin
Rain barrel
Me composting

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2 years ago
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http://find.galegroup.com/grnr/infomark.do?&source=gale&idigest=1a8e476c06cc4232a0f00b594bb745cc&prodId=GRNR&userGroupName=chic12414&tabID=T004&docId=A178863273&type=retrieve&contentSet=IAC-Documents&version=1.0

Gardening is a very complex pastime. Everyone thinks that spring is a time for beautiful new life and growth, but many people do not know the work and stress that goes into maintaining a garden. When winter ends gardening must start immediately, and gardeners must plan out their planting and begin. It is incredibly time consuming, and is endlessly working on a timer. Sometimes gardening seems pointless because of all the back breaking works that seems to only yield a few moments of relaxed appreciation. However, for a gardener life is not the same without the season determined time schedules and plants every year. All the work seems worth it in the end.

I wanted to find an article on gardening because that is what we are doing now in class. I am surprised to see the anguish that gardeners have. I never really thought it was a very extensive and demanding process, but for this gardener at least it very much was. Gardening is very important for the environment to continue cycles and keep the land alive. Although it is a lot of work I am pleased to see that there are people out there who are very passionate about gardening, and therefore it will hopefully always be around.

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2 years ago
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For my third quarter experience, and sort of a clean slate for the new year, I cleaned out my closet and donated my clothes. It took some time because it had been a while since I’d last ventured into the dark mess that was my closet, but it was worth it. I started by taking out all of my clothes and sorting out the ones I no longer wear or can no longer wear. Then, I reorganized. It doesn’t really seem like much, even if I can get a bit dramatic about the work load, but I know it goes a long way. My family donates all our clothes to Amvets, a program that works with American veterans, and I know my old clothes are going to a good new home. This small act on my part can make all the difference to someone in need. Other than the charitable aspect, my action also has environmental benevolence.
When we donate clothes I bet we don’t really think about it, but we are recycling. By repurposing the clothes we no longer wear, we are making sure that we do not waste the materials it took to make those clothes and that they do not end up in landfills. Garbage is a huge problem in the US, and we should try to do anything we can to reduce our waste. It is really a win all around because by donating clothes we recycle the materials, reduce our waste, and help clothe those who do not have access to or cannot afford clothing. My experience is extremely related to environmental science because we are learning how to be green and sustainable people. It is even more appropriate because we go to a Catholic school and charity and service are a big part of our call to faith.

2 years ago
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2 years ago
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Ahh, way to connect school and faith! Nice Job! 50/50

2 years ago
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2 years ago
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2 years ago
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2 years ago
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As you know, for my fourth quarter experience I planted a tree in my backyard. Initially I thought nothing of it seeing how easy it was to plant the tree at Marist with the class, but I quickly learned that 30 people with five shovels is slightly different than two people with one shovel. Once we recieved the tree from Mrs. Tobin, we tried to set our planting time. With homework and AP tests up and coming this in itself was not easy, but at 5:30 one night we broke earth in our backyard. I tried my best to remember everything that Daniella said about planting the tree. I measured how large the circle would be, had a little to much fun pogo sticking on the shovel to outline the circle, and laid out Thais on a tarp just like in class. Unfortunately, the tarp was rather small, the groud was very wet from previous rain, an electrical wire forced us to move the entire operation over a foot, and worst of all two huge rocks (pictured above) did there best to test our patience. After a lot of hard work (mostly on my dads end), one broken shovel, and an hour later everything was ready. We planted the tree carefully as we could to not touch the trunk and leave the important roots exposed. It felt really cool when it was all over. I'm really proud I get to leave something that will someday stand as tall as 60 at my house, especially because I'm going to college next year and my dad will probably be moving. It felt really good to do something beneficial for my community too. I feel like I have a new extensive knowledge about trees. I have also found a new relaxing hobby in planting and watering plants that I hope to contine. I'm really grateful for this opportunity!

2 years ago
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As far as I can tell, much of the aspects of environmentalism on the community level get pushed out of thought due to ignorance. My dad is a very strong environmentalist who works for the USGBC out of New York, so I was raised with a pretty hefty knowledge of the environment and the things normal people can do to help it. However, I did not know a great deal of information presented to us during class on Tuesday. One thing in particular I found surprising was that trees cannot heal. I guess I just assumed that all living things have the ability to heal because that is what I know about most mammals, insects, etc. Nevertheless, trees cannot heal. The life in those places with dead cells merely becomes a gapping space of decay that can lead to the total demise of the tree. Things as simple as putting a bike lock around a tree can harm and kill that section. Think about all the objects, people, and animals that knock into trees everyday. Everytime this happens that tree is harmed indefinitely. Although some of these occurrences happen naturally, we as humans should consciously act to reduce the amount of harm we do to trees.
There are several ways that we, as everyday community members, can help to save trees from abuse. For one, we can just plain out be careful around trees, especially saplings and especially near their roots. Watching out while mowing the lawn, playing outside, or riding bikes can help to reduce the daily disservice done to trees. Another interesting thing I learned was that the mounded mulch we see under most small trees is actually extremely bad for a tree’s growth. This volcanic mound of mulch cuts off essential nutrients from the tree stunting its growth and shortening its lifespan. To help in this wrong, anytime you see mounded dirt around a tree’s base simply push the dirt down and away from the trunk of the tree. Simple things can go a long way to save the trees in our community.

2 years ago
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What an ordeal! I'm glad the tree finally found its home and even though it was hard work I'm glad you enjoyed being outside and helping the community for decades to come. What a difference you made!!! Thanks for a great year, Fiona!! 50/50