White Fang Imagery

One Eye was desperate. He ranged far and wide, and slept but little in the lair that had now become cheerless and miserable. The she-wolf, too, left her litter and went out in search of meat. In the first days after the birth of the cubs, One Eye had journeyed several times back to the Indian Camp and robbed the rabbit snares; but, with the melting of the snow and the opening of the streams, the Indian Camp had moved away, and that source of supply was closed to him. (Chapter 6)

Dark spruce forest frowned on either side of the frozen waterway. The trees had been stripped by a recent wind of their white covering of frost, and they seemed to lean toward each other, black and ominous, in the fading light. A vast silence reigned over the land. The land itself was a desolation, lifeless, without movement, so lone and cold that the spirit of it was not even that of sadness. There was a hint in it of laughter, but of a laughter more terrible than any sadness-a laughter that was mirthless as the smile of the Sphinx, a laughter cold as the frost and partaking of the grimness of infallibility. It was the masterful and incommunicable wisdom of eternity laughing at the futility of life and the effort of life. It was the Wild, the savage, frozen-hearted Northland Wild. (Chapter 1)    

But it not last long. His face was blistering in the heat, his eyebrows and lashes were signed off, and the heat was becoming unbearable to his feet. With a flaming brand in each hand, he sprang to the edge of the fire. The wolves had been driven back. On every side, wherever the live coals had fallen, the snow was sizzling, and every little while a retiring wolf, with wild leap and snort and snarl, announced that one such live coal had been stepped upon. (Chapter 3)

To their ears came the sounds of dogs wrangling and scuffling, the guttural cries of men, the sharper voices of scolding women, and once the shrill and plaintive cry of a child. With the expectation of the huge bulks of the skin lodges, little could be seen save the flames of the fire, broken by the movements of intervening bodies, and the smoke rising slowly on the quiet air. But to their nostrils came the myriad smells of an Indian Camp, carrying a story that was largely incomprehensible to One Eye, but every detail of which the she-wolf knew. (Chapter 4)

And then he awoke to find the howling real. There was a great snarling and yelping. The wolves were rushing him . They were all about him and upon him. The teeth of one had closed upon his arm. Instinctively he leaped into the fire and as he leaped, he felt the sharp slash of teeth that tore through the flesh of his leg. Then began a fight. His stout mittens temporarily protected his hands, and he scooped live coals into the air in all directions, until the campfire took on the semblance of a volcano. (Chapter 3)

Comment Stream

2 years ago
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Overall, I think you did a very good job on your tackk! I really enjoyed the imagery examples you found from the book. Even better, your pictures for the imagery examples were perfect because it gave me a hint of how a visual would look from your imagery example. I think the best example was the last one because it had each of the five senses that were in realistic as well. Good job Paige!! :)

2 years ago
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lets redo this

2 years ago
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1. Your first paragraph was well chosen for the sense sight because most of the imagery in the paragraph was what you could visualize right in front of your face.

2 years ago
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2. I think choosing the opening paragraph of the book was a good decision because the author gave some background information while still using imagery and showing the reader, me, what was going on. Great pick on this paragraph.

2 years ago
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3. You're third paragraph was probably, in my opinion, one of the best out of all of yours. Why? I think this paragraph showed all of the imagery and sensory examples necessary for the reader to feel and know the emotions and feelings of the characters. Great pick!

2 years ago
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4. I like this paragraph because the imagery examples described the wolves and their actions so well that I could actually hear and see the wolves in my mind! This was a great pick that I personally enjoyed.

2 years ago
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1. I could really picture it. This paragraph showed some imagery and helped me see a clear setting of the scene.
2. In this paragraph, the vivid vocabulary described the scene very well. I really like how this paragraph also shows personification.
3. This paragraph describes the character and the setting quite well. I loved the words: blistering, unbearable, sizzling, snort and snarl.
4. I love this one the best! I love the vocabulary and how it specifically describes the scene. This paragraph uses all the imagery: smell, taste, sight, hear, and touch.
5. I could just imagine myself being there and hearing the wolves howl, growl and snarl. I could imagine the pain the man was feeling as his leg got slashed by the wolf.

GOOD JOB OVERALL CHOOSING THE PARAGRAPHS THAT SHOWED A LOT OF IMAGERY!!! :)

2 years ago
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5. I like that you picked this paragraph because the imagery in this little scene had me on the edge of my seat and made me feel like I was in the moment and scene of the book. This was a great imagery pick! Great job Paige!

2 years ago
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1.. the paragraph was good but is showed little imagery, you should try to pick more with more imagery.
2. great job in picking one with good imagery. it shows good imagery and it has imagery such as sight and sound. :]