Antoine Chaya

Senior Director of Strategic Accounts for Oracle Corporation

About Antoine Chaya

A senior director of strategic accounts at California-based Oracle Corporation, Antoine Chaya serves as the point of contact between his company and the organization’s business clients. He facilitates the objectives of his customers and oversees the development and implementation of projects, working closely with clients to proactively address their corporate needs. Antoine Chaya joined Oracle in 1997 as a director in the company’s consulting services division and earned a promotion to his current position in 2006.

A graduate of the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he completed an MBA and a Ph.D. in information technology management, Antoine Chaya also served as an instructor at the school. As a graduate student, he co-authored the 1996 article Exploring the Relationships between IT Investments and Organizational Performance: Preliminary Empirical Evidence, which was presented at the 29th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences.

Sauvignon Blanc Food Pairings

Throughout his career in Atlanta and the San Francisco Bay Area, Antoine Chaya has established himself as a top financial executive. Outside of his work as the senior director of strategic accounts with the Oracle Corporation in Redwood Shores, California, Antoine Chaya enjoys visiting Napa Valley and sampling the many wines the region has to offer. As the summer months set in, few varietals pair better with crisp summer dishes than Sauvignon Blanc.

It is important to note that Sauvignon Blanc can vary widely from region to region, and thus be paired with different foods. According to Food & Wine, a citrus-forward Sauvignon Blanc works well with spring vegetables such as asparagus and artichokes, which are otherwise hard to pair because they can make wine seem metallic-tasting or too sweet. With their uniquely herbal notes, New Zealand Sauvignon Blancs are an excellent complement to fish dishes, for example, pasta with anchovy carbonara. Peppery and grassy Sauvignon Blancs pair well with something like tomato and cilantro-based chicken skewers, while lighter vintages from Italy can accompany lighter fare, such as a shrimp salad with garlic dressing.

How Has Information Technology Benefited the Business Sector?

A senior director with Oracle Corporation, Dr. Antoine Chaya holds a PhD in information technology management from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Antoine Chaya has years of experience studying information technology and is the coauthor of several papers on the subject.

Information technology has benefited many aspects of business, beginning with the hiring of employees. Before the widespread use of technology in hiring, businesses were limited to the narrow range of people they could reach within their immediate area. With the advent of IT, businesses are now able to advertise jobs to a wide variety of people around the world and accumulate a database of applicants. Technology also enables automated filtering of nonqualified applicants, thereby saving time and money. Additionally, implementing IT solutions, such as digital time tracking tools, can save a company hours of employee labor that would otherwise be spent quantifying hours worked.

When it comes to keeping sensitive information safe, information technology offers businesses a secure way to protect important documents through the storage of data on multiple servers, as well as advanced security systems. IT also makes communication quick and efficient, even when employees work from separate locations. When companies employ a remote workforce, company overhead costs are reduced and employee commuting costs all but disappear.

The New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc

Antoine Chaya has nearly 20 years of experience with Oracle Corporation and currently maintains responsibilities as senior director of strategic accounts at the company’s Redwood Shores, California, office. A longtime wine enthusiast, Antoine Chaya enjoys sampling and learning about wines from across the globe.

When it comes to the Sauvignon Blanc varietal, perhaps no region has received more widespread acclaim than the Marlborough region of New Zealand. Since its introduction in the 1970s, the New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc has introduced a uniquely aromatic character to the perennial favorite, complete with notes of bell pepper and gooseberry. New Zealand Sauvignon Blancs have also been recognized for characters like grapefruit, fresh-cut grass, limes, and tomato stalks.

In terms of pairing, the zesty notes offered by New Zealand Sauvignon Blancs make the wine an ideal complement for citrus and garlic-based sauces. Thus, fish and shellfish, as well as salads and raw vegetables, are popular pairing choices.

The Impact of IT Investments on the Corporate Bottom Line

Antoine Chaya is a respected Silicon Valley executive who has served as senior director of strategic accounts with Oracle Corporation for the past decade. Respected in his field, Antoine Chaya coauthored the article “Analyzing Cost-Effectiveness of Organizations: The Impact of Information Technology Spending” (Journal of Management Information Systems, 1996) while pursuing doctoral studies at the Georgia Institute of Technology’s Dupree School of Management.

The background of the article was a dramatic upswing in U.S. corporate investments in IT over past decades. Despite investments that represented 4 percent of revenue for U.S. businesses on average, the white-collar productivity effects of this spending were characterized as disappointing. For example, while productivity among production workers increased nearly 17 percent over a 16-year period, productivity among information workers dropped by 6.6 percent.

Other research presented more encouraging company-level trends. One study of major firms from 1987 to 1991 estimated the year-on-year gains generated from IT capital investments as more than 50 percent. In particular, there was a significant inverse relationship between IT spending and lower costs of operations. Mr. Chaya’s data-driven research corroborated the latter findings, with cost factors seen as a major positive impact of IT investments. The automation aspect of the equation, involving lower labor costs, was not as readily apparent.