Eleanor Roosevelt

A Woman Ahead of Her Time

"You gain strngth, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face...." -Eleanor Roosevelt

Author Designation

My name is Grace and I am a 6th grade student at Holman Middle school. I am making this website for a research project in English. I am research Eleanor Roosevelt, there are many interesting facts about her that a lot of people don't know.

Introduction To Eleanor Roosevelt

    Eleanor  Roosevelt was born in New York City on October 11, 1884. She grew up in a wealthy Christian family that placed great value on community service. When she was ten, her mother Anna Hall Roosevelt died  of diphtheria.  Elliott Roosevelt, her father, was not with her family when her mother died because her mother sent him away until he would stop drinking. Eleanor and her father were very close despite this. She would write him letters and often would try to see him. However, her grandmother, who had taken Eleanor in after her mother had died, followed her mother's wishes and forbid Eleanor from having contact with her father until she was 18.  On August 13, 1894, Elliott Roosevelt died from alcoholism. She was heartbroken, not only was she now an orphan, and not even twelve, but her closest relationship with anyone had disappeared. When she was 15 her grandmother sent her to Allenswood, a girls’ boarding school in  London.

     Eleanor married Franklin D. Roosevelt on March 17, 1905. They had six children including one who died in infancy. In 1933 she became first lady. During her  twelve years of being first lady she had a newspaper column called "My Day" and actively participated in polities.  Through her actions, words and thoughts she changed what people thought of women. For example, she used most of her time to help people less fortunate than her. She volunteered at soup kitchens, established the National Youth Administration in 1935, and launched projects to employ writers, artists, musicians, and actors. She insisted that women’s wages be equal to men’s.

In her Mind others came first, and than herself

Volunteering: Step up to the plate

Some thought she was more active in politics than Franklin was

Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt helped solved many  of the US problems, especially the ones that affected women. When she entered The White House, it was during The Great Depression. The Great Depression caused many people to be broke and out of work. These problems drove Eleanor to open the doors of her own home to people in need of food and clothing. Franklin and Eleanor both thought of others before themselves. She created jobs that most everyone could do, with pay so they could survive.  But this wasn't enough for her; she  would write speeches about happiness and how everything will be better soon. She showed others  how important  it is to give back.

Politics: Not just for men

One big step in her political career was when Franklin became sick because of polo. Eleanor traveled across the United States, acting as her husband’s eyes and ears. Her love for speaking out and saying what she felt grew. One of her most prized accomplishments was that she wrote some of Franklin's speeches. She never got any credit for the speeches though. She helped with his campaigns and his decisions. In addition to working for  woman's rights, she also fought for the civil rights of African Americans and Asian Americans. She knew that diversity is a huge part of any nation. She spoke often at the Democratic National Convention in the woman division. She was one of the few woman strong enough to say anything, she was even chair of the subcommittee. As she moved forward, she became co-director, and one of the best know democratic in the country. While she was in the white house she quoted, "I never wanted to be a president's wife, and i don't want it now.... Now i shall have to work out my own salvation."

This is where she lived for 12 years when Franklin was president.

Citations

"American Experience: TV's Most-watched History Series." PBS. PBS, n.d. Web. 11 Jan. 2015.

"Eleanor Roosevelt." Britannica School. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2014. Web. 16 Dec. 2014. <http://school.eb.com/levels/middle/article/276785>.

"Anna Eleanor Roosevelt." Bio. A&E Television Networks, 2014. Web. 17 Dec. 2014.

Black, Allida. "Anna Eleanor Roosevelt." The White House. The White House, 2009. Web. 29 Dec. 2014.

Freedman, Russell. Eleanor Roosevelt: A Life of Discovery. New York: Clarion, 1993. Print.

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2 years ago
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I love the picture that you made with all the letters, but why all the colorful letters? I

2 years ago
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VERY creative website, I liked the colorful letters and the interactive element

2 years ago
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So sorry accidentally clicked enter! As i was saying....Is it mean something about Elanor Roosevelt?

2 years ago
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Does not is sorry again

2 years ago
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Is it true that Eleanor Roosevelt married her cousin? I wasn't very sure.

2 years ago
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I really like the quote and the pictures were very nice!

2 years ago
0

I never knew that she died just last year! thats a really cool fact!

2 years ago
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I love how you made her saying very interesting, it captures the eye!

2 years ago
0

Did her grandmother pass away? I liked the quote composed of all the different letters

a year ago
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Grace, I am a college student in Arizona, and came across your project. I want you to know that your project about Mrs. Roosevelt is far and above most of the Websites I have visited - created by adults! Thank you!