ONE OF AMERICA's MISTAKE OF THE 1920's

(The Sacco-Vanzetti Trial) - by Michael H. And Chris J.

BACKGROUND AND BEGINNING OF THE WITCH HUNT:

On August 23, 1927, the Common wealth of Massachusetts executed two Italian immigrants for a double murder. It is widely believed that the two men's reputation as anarchists prevented them from receiving a fair trial. The case remains one of the most controversial in American history.

There names were Bartolomeo Vanzetti and Nicola Sacco. Vanzetti worked part-time doing construction and the rest of the time peddling eels and clams. Sacco worked full-time as a shoe edger, and lived in Mulford, Massachusetts with his wife and son. Sacco and Vanzetti were members of this feared and despised anarchist group. They had both come to the United States from Italy in 1908 and settled in Massachusetts.

THE HEIGHT OF THE WITCH HUNT:

On April 15,1920, two employees of a shoe factory were shot and killed in South Braintree, Massachusetts. Three weeks later, Sacco and Vanzetti were arrested and charged with robbery and murder. Both were subscribed to Galleani's radical newspaper and were followers of Galleani and passionately believed in the principles of the anarchist movement. As anarchists, Sacco and Vanzetti had opposed war. When they arrived back the U.S., they were stuck upon the "Red Scare". In this trial Sacco and Vanzetti were the scapegoats to the witnesses of the crime scene when the actual murderers attacked.

THE END OF THE WITCH HUNT:

On April 9 , 1927, they were sentenced to death. The public opinion of the trial was different than before because many believed and debated whether the execution was at all necessary because there were more positive witnesses rather than ones who opposed, who protested for their innocence. They were vindicated because very many of the people believed that they were innocent, and they stood for their defense. This trial became the last of long train events that had driven any sense of idealistic vision out of American life.

CONNECTION TO THE CRUCIBLE:

This trial connects to The Crucible because in their society at this time period the people believed in nationalism, and by pointing immigrants of such groups as they were it made sense to accuse them.

SOURCES:

Watson B, "Sacco and Vanzetti." The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia.

New York.(2007)

Frankfurter, Felix. "The Case of Sacco and Vanzetti." Massachusetts

The Atlantic Monthly Group, (1927).

Ehrmann, Herbert B. " The Case That Will Not Die." Boston:

Beacon Press, (1969).

D'Attilio, Robert, and Jane Manthorn, et alia. "Sacco and Vanzetti:

Developments and Reconsiderations." Boston Public Library. (1979)

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