The Progression of Michelangelo

This tackk shows the progression of Michelangelo's work from the top to the bottom.

Michelangelo was one of the most unique artists to ever walk this earth. He embodied the true Renaissance man. While he called himself first and foremost sculptor, his paintings were immaculate.

His first painting was the Torment of Saint Anthony which shows how the Egyptian hermit-saint had a vision that he rose into the air and was attacked by demons.

A few years following, he completed The Manchester Madonna and the Entombment. In comparison to the Torment of Saint Anthony, the colors are much less vivid in both of these paintings, which could be attributed to the fact in which either the painting was finished. They focus on the human body. The Entombment is the first painting in which he painted a nude male. He is widely known as the greatest painter of the male nude, due to his extensive dissections to human bodies.

Unlike the previous two, the Doni Tondo was finished and is known as the only finished panel painting to survive. It is a painting filled with bright colors and seems to foreshadow the same colors used in the Sistine celling frescoes.

Next he painted the Battle of Casina, which he depicted a scene in the beginning of the battle. The original painting was lost, but he did sketch a cartoon version.

His most famous paintings are all in the Sistine Chapel. This was significant to his carrier because they were the first paintings he painted on fresco not on tempera and oil. The Creation of Adam is the most recognizable paintings in the chapel. It is incredible because of the detail and perfection Michelangelo used in painting Adams body.

Almost forty years after completing the Sistine chapel, he painted his last two pieces of art in the Cappella Paolina.These were also on Fresco. The Conversation of Saul and The Martyrdom of St Peter are both more mannerist in comparison to the Sistine Chapel frescos and at the time. These paintings show great depth and feeling used by light and darkness and perfectly depicts the unparalleled uniqueness of Michelangelo's work.

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2 years ago
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Great job Melissa! I saw The Torment of Saint Anthony on display at Kimbell Museum in Fort Worth, - it's such an intense depiction of spiritual warfare. Your collage work is nicely done; I enjoyed looking over his art. It's well-written too. Great job!👍

2 years ago
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I really enjoyed your comments regarding the progression. Very interesting to read. Having the works as a visual, adds to your interpretation and your readers ability to understanding your prospective. Good work.

2 years ago
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GREAT JOB ! - I hope you enjoyed researching him.

2 years ago
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You have assembled an eye-appealing collage with wonderful written summary comments on the progression of work by the great Michelangelo. Thank you for sharing it with me; I enjoyed seeing it immensely. You might enjoy reading The Agony and the Ecstasy by Irving Stone, an historical novel about the life of this incredible artist.

2 years ago
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Very interesting to read about his works that are shown. Love the collage too, overall, great work!

2 years ago
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I would love to say I can see the difference in his early work to later work but I can't. It is all gorgeous. Very interesting read.

2 years ago
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Melly! This collage is almost as fabulous as you are! I love how you made the pictures fade into the background. Nicely done! Much better than I could have ever done

2 years ago
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I like your font choice! It really blends well with all of the pictures 😍 The colors look well together, love it!

2 years ago
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It was interesting to learn that some of his paintings were lost, how incredible. Good work!

2 years ago
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The way you arranged and blended the images in your collage provided a sense of calm and allowed my eyes an easy way to follow your image explanations. Michelangelo was definitely an extremely gifted artist. Thanks for sharing.