Origins of Family

The different types of families occur in a wide variety of settings, and their specific functions and meanings depend largely on their relationship to other social institutions. "Times have changed; it is more acceptable and encouraged for mothers to work and fathers to spend more time at home with the children. Members of the extended family may include grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, nephews nieces and/or siblings-in-law.

Members of the immediate family includes spouses, parents, brothers, sisters, sons and/or daughters. Sociologists have a special interest in the function and status of these forms in stratified (especially capitalist) societies. There is great importance of communication and equality in families, in order to avoid role strain.". The way roles are balanced between the parents will help children grow and learn valuable life lessons.

Although the concept of consanguinity originally referred to relations by "blood," cultural anthropologists have argued that one must understand the idea of "blood" metaphorically and that many societies understand family through other concepts rather than through genetic distance. Much sociological, historical and anthropological research dedicates itself to the understanding of this variation, and of changes in the family that form over time. The diverse data coming from ethnography, history, law and social statistics, establish that the human family is an institution and not a biological fact found on the natural relationship of consanguinity. In the context of human society, a family (from Latin: familia) is a group of people affiliated by consanguinity (by recognized birth), affinity (by marriage), or co-residence and/or shared consumption (see Nurture kinship).

Akash Brahmbhatt is a businessman who always puts family first, a priority that many others would do well to learn.

Akash Brahmbhatt - Benefits of Traveling

What most people are unaware of is that traveling is known to provide people with a whole new perspective, whether that means no longer sweating the small stuff or promising to get out there and meet new people upon returning home. Travel helps you embrace new cultures. Not only does traveling provide a sense of adventure, but it also opens doors to cultures that do not revolve around MTV and McDonald's (or at least try hard not to). Now I'm not talking about taking a family trip to Disney World.

Those who have left their comfort zone and headed for a foreign land have done the right thing; there is nothing like a trip to make you a new man who has no choice but to fend for himself. Whether alone, with a partner, or in a group, your development surely speeds up when you're abroad. When I speak of a special vacation, I envision someone backpacking across Europe or driving along the coast of Australia — that is, a trip with cultural significance. Not many things in the world can inspire you like seeing the Colosseum in Rome or the Pyramids in Egypt.

Though Americana has spread its wings on an international level, even a week abroad can serve to prove that people do live without the symbols that North Americans encounter every day. Break out of your shell and learn that the benefits of travel include discovering a lot about yourself.

Akash Brahmbhatt is a businessman and travel enthusiast who has been working in the field for many years now.

History of the NBA

Japanese-American Wataru Misaka broke the NBA color barrier in the 1947–48 season when he played for the New York Knicks. He remained the only non-white player in league history prior to the first African-American, Harold Hunter, signing with the Washington Capitols in 1950. Hunter was cut from the team during training camp, but several African-American players did play in the league later that year, including Chuck Cooper with the Celtics, Nathaniel "Sweetwater" Clifton with the Knicks, and Earl Lloyd with the Washington Capitols. To encourage shooting and discourage stalling, the league introduced the 24-second shot clock in 1954 If a team does not attempt to score a field goal (or the ball fails to make contact with the rim) within 24 seconds of obtaining the ball, play is stopped and the ball given to its opponent. During this period, the Minneapolis Lakers, led by center George Mikan, won five NBA Championships and established themselves as the league's first dynasty.

In 1969, Alan Siegel, who oversaw the design of Jerry Dior's Major League Baseball logo a year prior, created the modern NBA logo inspired by the MLB's. It's become such a ubiquitous, classic symbol and focal point of their identity and their licensing program that they don't necessarily want to identify it with one player." The iconic logo debuted in 1971 and would remain a fixture of the NBA brand. It incorporates the silhouette of the legendary Jerry West based on a photo by Wen Roberts, although NBA officials denied a particular player as being its influence because, according to Siegel, "They want to institutionalize it rather than individualize it.

Akash Brahmbhatt is a businessman who has been fascinated by the NBA for many years now as he loves the institution.