Latin review project

Group C. John M, Liam M, Ryan T.

What do you know about Adjectives & Adverbs?

WARM UP: Start with the evens of D p.193.  You have 5 minutes to try it on your own, and then we will go over it.


ADJECTIVES

Comparative:
When comparing 2 things in English we use the comparative form of an adjective. To do this we add '-er' to the end of the adjective or precede it with 'more'

**To form the comparative of most Latin adjectives we use the ending '-ior' for the masculine and feminine and the ending '-ius' for the neuter form.

*EG: The comparative for pulcher, pulchra, pulchrum 'beautiful' is pulchrior (masculine), pulchrior (feminine) andpulchrius (neuter) 'more beautiful'.

*Apart from the nominative singular ending of '-ior' or '-ius', these forms decline like third declension nouns.



Superlative:

When we compare more than two things in English we often use the superlative form of an adjective.

*To do this we add '-est' to the end of the adjective or precede it with 'most'.
EG: most beautiful or prettiest

**To form the superlative of most Latin adjectives we use the ending '-imus' for the masculine form, '-ima' for the feminine form, and '-imum' for the neuter form. The formation of the central stem of the superlative depends on the type of adjective.

**EG: The superlative for pulcher, pulchra, pulchrum 'beautiful' is pulcherrimus (masculine), pulcherrima (feminine),pulcherrimum (neuter) 'the most beautiful'.

The forms decline like ‘bonus, -a, -um’.  

When it comes to translating Latin comparatives and superlatives, be aware that their meanings are more flexible than those in English and can be expressed in a variety of different ways.




ADVERBS


Comparatives:
When we compare the way in which two things are carried out in English we often use the comparative form of an adverb.

**To form the comparative of most Latin adverbs, we use the accusative singular neuter of the comparative adjective and so the ending for M/F is often '-ius' and for N 'ior'.

**
To do this we most commonly precede the adverb with 'more'.
EG: more beautifully.

Superlative:
To form the superlative of most Latin adverbs, we replace the '-us' ending of the superlative adejectives with '-e' so the endings are '-issime', '-errime', '-illime' . 

When we compare the way in which more than two things are carried out in English we often use the superlative form of an adverb.  

`
To do this we precede it with 'most'.  EG: most  beautifully.

Quam:
When ‘quam’ is used with a comparative adjective or adverb, it means ‘than’.
When ‘quam’ is used with a superlative adjective or adverb, it means ‘as ...as possible’.

Now, time to PRACTICE:
Do the evens of C p.34 and the odds of E p.35 in your blue CLC Unit II Textbook

Comment Stream