Brazil Culture Project
by: Esteban Armendariz

History:

The country of Brazil was first founded by the Portuguese navigator Pedro Alvares Cabral.  Pedro Cabral was sent by King Manuel I from Portugal to form trade routes to India.  During the journey to India, the ship was blown off course and ended up in shores of Brazil.  Pedro named the land, "Terra da Vera Cruz". The Portuguese signed the Treaty of Tordesillas in 1500 in order to claim the land as theirs.  During the year of 1501, Portugal sent Italian navigator Amerigo Vespuccito to explore the areas many capes and bays.  He named one of the bays Rio de Janeiro.

"Brazil: History." World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 2 Nov. 2014.

Climate Region:

Brazil's climate is a diverse climate because it is different throughout the country depending where you are.  For example, the climate of the Amazon Basin is hot and wet due to it being a tropical rain forest.  Common annual temperatures range from 80°F to 90°F during the day and dropping to 50°F at night.  It nearly gets an average of 80 inches of rainfall between the months of December and May.   The highlands region nearly gets about 60 inches of rain between the months of October and April. Coastal cities for example, like Rio de Janiero have average temperatures between 73°F to 80°F, compared to other  cities that have higher elevations like as São Paulo, have more extreme ranges of 59°F to 86°F.

Brazil: Landforms & Climate." World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 2 Nov. 2014

Food:

Brazil's food may vary depending on the region, but most people eat black beans, rice, and cassava.  For example, in Salvador, a famous dish called Vatapa includes, combinations of fish, shrimp, coconut milk, and palm oil.  Another dish called carucu includes red peppers, shrimp, and okra.  In cattle ranching areas such as Rio Grande do Sul, the traditional meal is called churrasco. It includes different types of cuts of meat, sausage, spicy sauces made by tomato and onion are all grilled on an open fire.  In the Amazon region, a typical dish is pato no tucupi, which is a spicy type of duck and wild herbs.  Feijoada is a meal for Sunday afternoon or special occasions in Rio de Janeiro. Black beans are flavored with smoked meats, served with white rice, and accompanied by the traditional garnishes of fresh oranges, kale, and cassava.

"Brazil: Food and Holidays." World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 2 Nov. 2014.

Religion:

Brazil has a variety of religions but it is mostly a Roman Catholic country.  It is the largest Roman Catholic country due to the population and the second largest Christian country in the world. However, many Brazilians practice a second religion.  Three-quarters of Brazilians are considered Catholic and one-quarter being Judaism.  Today, Brazil has the second-largest Jewish population in South America. Brazil also contains about half a million Muslims.  Most Muslims came to Brazil due to the fall of the Ottoman Empire after World War I.  Finally, due to the fact that there is a large diverse population of Japanese immigrants in Brazil, this means that there is a variety of Eastern religions such as Shintoism and Buddhism.

Edwards, Todd L. "Brazil: People." World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 2 Nov. 2014.

Citations:

1. "Brazil: History." World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 2 Nov. 2014.

2. Brazil: Landforms & Climate." World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 2 Nov. 2014.

3. "Brazil: Food and Holidays." World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 2 Nov. 2014.

4. Edwards, Todd L. "Brazil: People." World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 2 Nov. 2014.

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