Australia: A Look at it's Social Issues

A class project in Mr. Smith's English 10 at Cardinal Newman HS

Project Overview

Project Proposal

Name: Paris Bryson

Period: 1

Nation of your choice: Australia

Rationale (or explanation why you are curious about this country): I have met many amazing people from this beautiful country and have been interested on how they live their lives. Their schooling systems, their way of transportation, and how they spend their holidays. That and of course it's beautiful scenery, beaches, mountains  volcanoes etc. I've never been a surfer, but I bet

Summary (of what you already know about the history, geography, culture, and social issues): What I know about Australia is that whenever an issue occurs, that has to do with their country, they don't let it slide. They get right to the source of the problem and fix it. For example, they just recently passed a law that all flights to Iraqi City, the most known terrorist location, are illegal unless for a "legit" reason. As everyone knows, Australia is an island-continent, with beautiful beaches and hot climates. They're culture has many differences from ours in the US. From the way they dress, to their schooling system, to what side of the street they drive on.

Prediction (about what you think you will discover or hope to discover during your research): I think that I will find things about Australia that are similar to the issues we're having here in the US, but I think I'll find that they solve their problems better and faster than we do in the States.

Discussion (of the importance of this nation in the global community, i.e., the “so what?”): The importance of this community is that they were established as a prisoner ground for all the criminals in England, and that they have grown so much as a nation. They went from being people with no freedom or rights, to being their own nation.

New York Times Topics: Australia

#1 They Say, I Say

Student Name: Paris Bryson

Period: 1

Title of article (in quotation marks): "Trial to push for better flight tracking a year after MH370"

Title of newspaper (underlined or italicized): New York Times

Essay Author: Matt Siegel

Date of Publication: March 2, 2015, 2:19 AM E.S.T.

Essay main idea/thesis statement: "Australia, Indonesia, & Malaysia are launching a trial to allow air traffic controllers to more closely track aircraft traversing remote oceans such as the one believed to be the final resting place Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370"

Quote: According to Siegel, "MH370 vanished from radar screens shortly after taking off from Kuala Lumpur, bound form Beijing, early on March 8th [2013]. Investagators believe it was flown thousands of miles off course before eventually crashing into the ocean off Australia".


Comment: Siegel's idea on this tragic incident are extremely important because they shed insight on the difficult problem of aircraft safety. People think that they're always going to be safe when flying, usually because they have been in the past. We still don't know for sure where this aircraft is or what happened to it. So for Australia to pass this "law" or "requirement" of having a closer tracking on airlines is very beneficial to everyone involved.

#2 They Say, I Say

Title of article (in quotation marks): "Australia Arrests 2 on Suspicion of Plotting 'Imminent' Attack"

Title of newspaper (underlined or italicized): The New York Times

Essay Author: Michelle Innis

Date of Publication: Feb. 10, 2015

Essay main idea/thesis statement: "Australia's counterterrorism police have arrested two men in a Sydney suburb and thwarted "an imminent attack," the police said Wednesday."

Quote: "In September, a man described by the police as a "known terror suspect" whose passport had been confiscated was shot dead near Melbourne after attacking two police officers with a knife."


Comment: By focusing on the fact they were "shot dead" by italicising it, Innis overlooks the deeper problem of the terrorist situation. She shows that not only are they trying to protect their country from terrorists, but themselves from them too. They pose a direct offense towards individual people and it's getting out of control.

#3 The Big 5

Title of article (in quotation marks): "Australia Bans Travel to Iraqi City of Mosul Under New Law"

Title of newspaper (underlined or italicized): The New York Times

Essay Author: The Associate Press

Date of Publication: March 2, 2015

1. AUDIENCE AND PURPOSE (Focus on who. Who wrote the text? Who was it written for? Why did the writer write it?) A person who really wants to get a point across wrote this article to/for the people of Australia. They did this because the topic of the article is not only happening in Australia, but all around the world.

2. CONTENT AND THEME (Focus on the what. What is the text about? What is the author’s message?) The message the author was trying to get across was not only that if you go this certain part of Islamic Territory that you'll be punished, but that the horror and intensity of the terrorists attacks are so extreme and for no good reason.

3. TONE AND MOOD (Focus on the how. What is the writer’s tone? How does the text make the reader feel? What kind of diction is used to create a certain tone/mood?) The writer sets the mood of pure disgust towards the ISIS group and their terrible crimes. They do this by using a quote from Foreign Minister Julie Bishop, "Examples of these hideous crimes include the execution of 13 teenage boys in January for simply watching a soccer match".

4. STYLISTIC DEVICES (What stylistic devices does the writer use? To what effect? Common devices: irony, sarcasm, rhetorical questions, figurative speech, analogy, metaphor, etc.) The type of wording or style of text this author used was more fact-based. They put a lot of numbers, facts, stats, and quotes from economic/political leaders, showing the concern and greatness of the situation.

5. STRUCTURE (What kind of text is it? What structural conventions are used?) This kind of text is a columned, headlined article.

#4 The Big 5

Title of article (in quotation marks): "Australia to Send More Troops to Iraq as Trainers in ISIS fight."

Title of newspaper (underlined or italicized): The New York Times

Essay Author: Michelle Innis

Date of Publication: March 2, 2015

1. AUDIENCE AND PURPOSE (Focus on who. Who wrote the text? Who was it written for? Why did the writer write it?) An Australian woman who is writing to general public of the Australian people is writing this article to keep them aware of what's going on in the war right now, and how it really is starting to become a World War. So many different countries are fighting right now in the Middle East and so many troops from each of those countries are going in and risking their lives for their country. The author of this article is trying to show that.

2. CONTENT AND THEME (Focus on the what. What is the text about? What is the author’s message?) The theme is more of a PSA to the people of Australia, and the World. The war going on right now in the Middle East is bigger than we think. So many people are losing their lives because of this war and that's what this article is saying without using those exact words.

3. TONE AND MOOD (Focus on the how. What is the writer’s tone? How does the text make the reader feel? What kind of diction is used to create a certain tone/mood?) The tone that the author is using is one of just shedding some light on the situation. She gives information on why the troops are being called in, and who is asking for them, leaving us without questions on where, when, and why these troops are being taken over seas to fight for our countries.

4. STYLISTIC DEVICES (What stylistic devices does the writer use? To what effect? Common devices: irony, sarcasm, rhetorical questions, figurative speech, analogy, metaphor, etc.) Again, like in the last article, this type of writing is more fact-based, and just giving us, the readers, information about what's going on in the world.

5. STRUCTURE (What kind of text is it? What structural conventions are used?) Columned and has four good, strong body paragraphs.

Letter to...

Mrs. Paris Bryson

4986 Arcadia Dr.

Santa Rosa, CA 95401

March 21, 2015

City of Santa Rosa - Police Department

965 Sonoma Ave

Santa Rosa, CA 95404

Dear Santa Rosa Police Department,

My name is Paris Bryson and I am a sophomore at Cardinal Newman High School. I am writing you this letter because my English class is doing a Country Report and we have been doing lots of research on countries of our choice and it rose some questions that I would like to ask you.

I read an article on Australia, the country I chose to research for my report, and it made me start thinking. This article was from the New York Times and titled “Australia Arrests 2 on Suspicion of Plotting ‘Imminent’ Attack”. In this article, it talked about how two Islamic men in a suburb of Sydney were arrested because the police had received a ‘tip’ that they were planning a terrorist act. The Police went and raided the men’s home and found a homemade Islamic flag and a video of one of the men talking about carrying out an attack. It says in the article that “the raid was carried out quickly because it was feared that an attack was planned for that day”.

So to get to the real point of my letter, I have just a few questions I’m hoping you can answer. I know that terrorism is a huge problem in the world right now, so I was wondering if you in Santa Rosa have been called about a terrorist threat? I am well aware of the bomb threat that was sent into my school, but other than that is it common in our city (or county). Another question I have is, I don’t know anything really on Australian laws, but isn’t it that you have to a warrant first before raiding a building or home? Is there any special scenario when a raid can be taken place without a warrant? My final question is, how reliable is a tip? In this article a tip was given that there was an attack about to be taken place. In that specific case I understand that it would be unsafe to not respond, but in a different type of crime (robbery, murder, or a hotline to help with missing person for reward etc.) how do you know when to respond to a tip without sending everyone out on a wild goose chase? I know these may seem like “pointless” or “obvious” questions, but I was just hoping to get some insight from the Police Department themselves.

So to conclude, I’m just hoping for a response from possibly one of the officers, or anyone who can shed some light on my questions. Thank you for your service to this city and for keeping us Newman kids safe a couple weeks ago.

Sincerely,

Paris Bryson

Comment Stream

2 years ago
0

I find it really interesting that they still haven't found this missing airplane. With all the technology that we have today, it is very hard to believe that they can't find the plane. I think that maybe it disintegrated when it hit the water. What do you think happened to the plane?