The bonds of chemistry

Ionic bonds: ionic bonds are bonds that are formed when electrons are transferred between metals and non-metals. The characteristics of ionic bonds are solubility, conductivity only when dissolved or as a liquid, a high melting point, and a granular or powdery appearance. Some examples are sodium chloride or table salt (NaCl), silver iodide (AgI), and potassium fluoride (KF).

Covalent bonds: covalent bonds are bonds that are formed when electrons are shared equally or unequally between non-metals. Their characteristics are a granular or powdery appearance,   occasional solubility, a relatively low melting point, and no conductivity. hydrogen (H2), water (H2O), and methane (CH4) are all examples of covalent bonds.


Metallic bonds: metallic bonds are bonds that are formed when electrons freely move between metals. Metallic properties include a shiny appearance, a high melting point, malleability, no solubility, and conductivity. A few examples are mercury (Hg), brass (CuZn), and platinum (Pt).

Salt, water, and mercury

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