Canada's involvement in the Wars give Canada the Frame it has Today!

By Sara Salem | July 27th, 2014

                   Throughout the 20th century, Canadians have done many amazing things and thus, giving an image to the entire world that Canadians aren't just about small talk. However, Canadians have also done very horrible things causing us to hide in a corner due to shame. Canada's involvement in wars impacted Canadians’ nationalism heavily. The impacts had both positive and negative outcomes towards any Canadian’s pride. In my opinion, three positive roles that made me feel proud to be a Canadian was Canada’s economy increasing during the war, women obtaining the right to vote after World War I, and when Canada became its own nation. Conversely, three negative roles that made me feel disappointed or ashamed to be a Canadian was the sacrifices of human lives, flu pandemic, and the War Measures Act.

                    Whenever someone asks for my nationality, I would first state that I am a proud Canadian! That is only due to the great things our fellow Canadians have done for our country. The first role that makes me feel swollen with pride was when Canada initiated towards developing a great economy. A great economy included, more jobs, more income and a happier life for Canadians. It started out when, Canada started building planes, ships and shells. There were also many resources that were in very high demand such as lumber, copper, nickel, lead, and as well as military supplies like ammo, guns, and lots of food. These demands brought lots of job opportunities, especially for woman. Since many women didn't have jobs, when men went to work in the trenches during war, women took the job of making money for their family. Another role that makes me feel proud to be a Canadian was when, woman obtaining the right to vote. Since Canadian women contributed towards the war, they obtained the right to vote. Bit by bit, each province started allowing women vote. Manitoba being the first in 1917 and Quebec being the last in 1940. Today, women still have the right to vote like any other gender. Their contribution to the war made a huge difference for Canada and for themselves. Finally, the last role that makes me feel self-righteous to be a Canadian was when Canada gained it’s independence. Given that Canada contributed to World War I, Canada was ‘seen’ to have its separate nation from Britain. Brought to conclusion in 1931, the Statute of Westminster was passed by the British government and that was when Canada gained the same status as Britain. Concluding Canada to become its own nation.

Canadian women have the right to vote in Canada.

                      With every positive, there is a negative. Even though Canadians so many great things, sometimes they do things that make me doubt my degree of nationalism. The first role that makes me mortified to be a Canadian was the human cost it took to end the war. When thousands of Canadians died during World War I and thousands were injured. I was saddened to know that many families were left without loved ones after the war was over. The war was named the war to end all wars. However, instead of doing that, we end up having another war 21 years later. This was depressing because many men sacrificed their lives to prevent another war from arising. Not only did they died because of the war, but many died due to catching a flu called Flu Pandemic. Bringing me to the next role that makes me mortified to be a Canadian. Many soldiers brought this deadly influenza with them home and its horrible to know that the flu killed more people than the war itself, worldwide. Over 50,000 Canadians have died because of it. To add on, many had to wear masks over their mouth so that they could try to stop the spread of the flu. This was all because the soldiers were not careful about their health after the war, bringing back home such a deadly disease. Finally, the last role that makes me ashamed to be Canadian was when Minister Borden introduced the War Measure Acts in 1914. This made me ashamed because, the War Measure Acts restricted lots of freedom from the Canadians during the war, giving the government way more power. In addition, if the Canadian government suspected any ‘enemy alien’, they would either imprison them or deport them from the country.

Many Sick because of the Pandemic Flu

                 In conclusion, the impacts had both positive and negative outcomes towards Canadians pride. In my opinion, three positive roles that made me feel proud to be a Canadian was Canada’s economy increasing during the war, women obtaining the right to vote after World War I, and when Canada became its own nation. Conversely, In my opinion, three negative roles that made me feel disappointed or ashamed to be a Canadian was the sacrifices of human lives, flu pandemic, and the War Measures Act. However, even though we have come across some negatives from the past, we reflect about the faults Canadians have done from before and make sure that it doesn’t happen again!

A Canadian Soldier enjoying the blackberries he had just gathered in Bourlon Woo

Comment Stream

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Peace is always the Answer :)

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I added some gifs at the end to just give people a picture or a mindset towards how I feel about war or how I see war.

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Works cited
Smith, Mathew. 2014. 'Positive And Negative Effects Of WW1 On Canada'. Presentation, , (accessed July 27, 2014).
Stacey, C.P, and Richard Foot. 2013. 'Second World War (WWII)'. Historica Canada. http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/second-world-war-wwii/, (accessed July 27, 2014).
Collectionscanada.gc.ca,. 2014. 'ARCHIVED - War Diaries - ARCHIVED - Canada And The First World War - Library And Archives Canada'. http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/firstworldwar/025005-1600-e.html, (accessed July 27 2014)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, 1918 flu pandemic, 23 July 2014, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1918_flu_pandemic, (accessed July 27, 2014).
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, Women's suffrage, 25 July 2014, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women's_suffrage, (accessed July 27, 2014).​

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