Wac's waves and Rosie the riveter and woman in the war

Katelyn miller-Naden

The term "Rosie the Riveter" was first used in 1942 in a song of the same name written by Redd Evansand John Jacob Loeb.

Although women took on male dominated trades during World War II, they were expected to return to their everyday housework once men returned from the war. Later, many women returned to traditional work such as clerical or administration positions, despite their reluctance to re-enter the lower-paying fields.[

During World War II, some 350,000 women served in the U.S. Armed Forces, both at home and abroad. They included the Women's Airforce Service Pilots, who on March 10, 2010, were awarded the prestigious Congressional Gold Medal. Meanwhile, widespread male enlistment left gaping holes in the industrial labor force. Between 1940 and 1945, the female percentage of the U.S. workforce increased from 27 percent to nearly 37 percent, and by 1945 nearly one out of every four married women worked outside the home.

World War II transformed the United States Armed Forces from essentially all-male to mixed-gender forces.

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