The Do's of Coaching

  • DO be an admirer & support system...in lieu of an evaluator.
  • DO call yourself what people want to call you: a coach, a collaborator, a team-teacher.  DO remember the title/name doesn't matter.
  • DO listen first...instead of going in talking about what everyone else is doing.
  • DO show the non-tech option.
  • DO start slow.
  • DO talk about success but model failure--talk about the times things didn’t work for you!
  • DO build a support group for teachers.
  • DO have teachers decide how they work best:
    • with a partner?
    • on their own meeting with you?
    • in a small group?
    • communicating electronically?
    • meeting face-to-face?
  • DO create a digital hub for everything you create and reference so that people can find stuff at 2 am.
  • DO truly get to know your teachers and understand their personalities.
  • DO offer a diverse buffet of options.
  • DO customize, personalize, and differentiate your strategies to meet the needs of your learners.
  • DO foster a partnership & work to make connections with teachers.
  • DO be a researcher...help teachers find answers!
  • DO be a detective.

Strategies for
Discovering Personality Types

Observe People in Different Environments

  • Daily Life:
    • Is the person involved with other faculty in committees or student organizations?
    • Is the person a leader, a follower, or neither in the school environment?
    • What does the person talk about at lunch?
  • The Classroom:
    • What’s happening on her whiteboard?
    • What kinds of items are on her walls?
    • When you walk in his classroom, what is he doing?
      • Is he talking the whole time while his students are sitting & listening?
      • Are students actively engaged in learning activities?
      • Are students working collaboratively?
  • At a faculty meeting or professional development opportunity
    • Where does he sit?
    • What does she bring with her?
    • Does he interact with others?
    • Does she ask questions?
    • What does his body language tell you?
    • What do her words tell you? Does she tell a story about a friend/colleague/student that you think might actually be reflective of her own thoughts and experiences?

Different Personality Types

Please Note:
I am a teacher.  I am a huge fan of teachers.  
I am NOT diminishing teachers by having created the following
"personality stereotypes."

My goal is to demonstrate how different people come at life
& teaching with different perspectives.

It is our responsibility as coaches to work with all different people...
to meet people where they are and help them move forward.

  • Charlie is a dedicated teacher who has a strong desire to teach.
  • Charlie is fascinated by his content, the curriculum, and the standards.
  • Charlie’s whole classroom is designed to address the curriculum, and his students' test scores reflect his dedication.
  • Charlie gets frustrated when “these kids don’t study for the tests” and don’t seem to care about the curriculum that he values so highly.
  • Charlie is focused and concerned about the time-constraints that standardized tests force on his planning.
  • He works hard to make sure that he gets through the book and is hesitant to try new strategies for teaching because they might take too much time away from the curriculum.
  • At whole group PD or faculty meetings, Charlie is often very focused on timelines, deadlines, and wants a big picture idea of how the month ahead is going to look so he can plan.
  • Holly is a strong teacher who loves her students and wants to see them succeed.
  • Holly is at home in front of a group of kids and enjoys interacting with them.
  • Holly doesn’t mind finding new strategies to help students learn, but she is hesitant about technology.
  • Holly struggles with technology and is very concerned about looking silly trying to make it work. She knows the kids know more than she does, and she worries about failing.
  • Holly sometimes leaves whole-group professional development overwhelmed and discouraged figuring she’ll never figure it out.
  • Nelly is an outwardly negative person who has a snarky sense of humor. She often makes people laugh, but her pessimism can be contagious.
  • Nelly doesn’t mind trying new technologies, but when things don’t work perfectly the first time, she is easily frustrated.  She chalks it up to the frustrations of technology and figures that’s how it always goes.
  • Nelly’s negativity is often a self-fulfilling prophecy.
  • Nelly views the educational system as wrought with error.  She is often seen rolling her eyes at any new initiatives or ideas.
  • Nelly is participatory at faculty meetings, but her negative attitude can be frustrating for people presenting new ideas.
  • Fred is an enthusiastic, motivated teacher who is super excited about everything new.
  • Fred often takes on more than he can handle and can be a bit disorganized at times.
  • Fred loves getting ideas at faculty meetings, workshops, conferences, and he loves working with other people.
  • Fred often tries out many different strategies at one time; and instead of mastering them and having success, his desire to do it all backfires, leaving him frustrated.
  • Fred is a fun person to have at a meeting because he is actively engaged in the conversation and enjoys sharing ideas.
  • Polly is a fabulous teacher who enjoys working with students and colleagues.
  • Polly doesn’t mind playing with new technologies. She is an early-adopter who tries things outs independently.
  • Polly learns quickly and doesn’t worry about making mistakes along the way.  She is open to suggestions for how she can improve.
  • Polly loves when the students show her something new, and she is often one of the people who pilots a new technology program.
  • Polly enjoys working with other people and is always willing to help people & share what she’s doing in the classroom.
  • Polly's students spend most of their day actively engaged, working collaboratively, as Polly supports their learning.
  • Polly is an actively engaged member of whole group professional development or faculty meeting.
  • Anita is a experienced teacher who loves her job.  She is appreciated by her administration, and she has great relationships with her parents and students.
  • Anita is an early adopter of technology.
  • Anita has been integrating technology into her curriculum with her own personal devices for years.
  • As technology becomes mainstream practice in her school, Anita is concerned that the administration or tech coaches might tell her that she’s been doing it wrong all along or not recognize her as a leader in this movement.
  • Anita worries she’ll be told she can’t use her already-working strategies, but she is also excited about the new devices.
  • Anita is easily bored during a whole-group PD event because she is used to tuning out lessons about “stuff she already knows.” Because she tunes out everything, Anita sometimes misses information that would be beneficial to her.
  • Robert is a strong educator who has many years of experience.  His students work hard to meet his high standards, and, for the most part, they enjoy his class.
  • Robert is resistant to change in general, and technology is not an exception.
  • Robert sees his job as becoming more difficult with all of the new ideas about the way education should be.
  • Robert figures the way it was when he went to school should be good enough for the kids of today.
  • Robert is NOT interested in turning his lessons into some kind of song and dance just to get kids engaged.
  • During a professional development event or faculty meeting, Robert is somewhat engaged, but he often sits with his arms crossed, silently signaling his irritation with new ideas.

DO:  Decipher the
WHY of the Personality

What makes people unique? Why do they feel as they do? What has happened in their lives or careers that has created their unique perspectives?

  • While the wide variety of personality types amongst faculty members can be frustrating for any leader in a building, we must remember that that’s life!
  • People all come at life from their own unique perspective.
  • Just as our students are unique individuals with their own set of beliefs, values, skills, knowledge, and abilities...our teachers are no different!
  • In the same way that teachers can't expect a student without breakfast to excel on a test...we as coaches can't expect a teacher who has struggled with self-confidence in many areas of life to gracefully embrace technology integration with ease.
  • It is our job as coaches to try to decipher the WHY of the personality traits and work to discover strategies to help them.

So...what's the answer?

What is the Key TO Success?

  • Successful teachers exude self-confidence & promote joyful learning for students.
  • Success breeds success...when teachers are successful, students are more successful.
  • When any person starts to feel a sense of success, that success can develop into many more opportunities for success.
  • As we help our teachers find success, we unlock the unlimited potential of our students.
  • Success can promote optimism!

Success Can Promote Optimism.
Optimistic people in our schools can help us achieve our goals.

DO:  Discover the
"TechCess Language"
of your teachers

Charlie's "TechCess" Language:

Efficiency & Effectiveness
to Streamline & Simplify

In other words:
Make it work & make his life easier to get him started!

  • DO ACKNOWLEDGE Charlie's success with curriculum and standards.
  • DO WORK to understand Charlie’s perspective in terms of time constraints and pressure.
  • DO EXPECT that Charlie will benefit more from 1 on 1 contact than from whole group or even small group meetings.
  • DO ASK Charlie what his goals are for himself and for his students.
  • DO LISTEN to Charlie as he explains his perspective.
  • DO HELP Charlie by offering suggestions for ways that technology can streamline his workflow.
  • DO START by offering Charlie 1 or 2 strategies that will increase his productivity & lessen his time spent grading papers, creating assessments, or setting up learning experiences.
    • Some Practical Examples:
      • DO HELP Charlie learn to create a Google Form to assess student knowledge.
      • DO WORK with Charlie to utilize Flubaroo to grade quizzes or tests for him.
      • DO SHOW Charlie how saving files to cloud storage (such as Google Drive or Dropbox) can help him access work at home more easily and efficiently.
      • DO DEMONSTRATE to Charlie that his frog dissection project can be accomplished online, thereby decreasing the amount of work in setup, cleanup, etc.

Holly's"TechCess" Language:

Support, Assistance, and Mentoring

In other words:
Help her!  Don't make her do it alone! Baby steps!

  • DO TRY to understand Holly’s fears. Holly is probably just naturally somewhat self-deprecating and very self-conscious.
  • DO EXPECT that Holly will benefit more from 1 on 1 contact from whole group or even small group meetings.
  • DO SHARE stories of your own failures with Holly.
  • DO OFFER Holly some non-tech options on a regular basis!
  • DO LISTEN to Holly as she explains her reservations.
  • DO SUPPORT Holly by being her confidant, cheerleader, and president of her fan club!
  • DO START very SLOWLY with Holly...offering her 1 or 2 strategies that she will be immediately successful at implementing.
  • DO TEAM-TEACH with Holly, demonstrating and modeling the use of any new technology in her classroom.
  • DO SCAFFOLD Holly’s success by ensuring consistent coaching or team-teaching sessions.
  • DO MAKE mistakes in front of Holly and allow students to teach you new things about technology while she observes.
  • DO ENGAGE Holly’s students in something new and fun so she can see and feel their excitement and joy.
  • DO SUPPORT your lessons with Holly with tutorials--written or screencasts--so she can look back when she forget something.
  • Some Practical Examples:
    • DO START with creating & sharing a Google Doc.
    • DO CHOOSE technology tools in the beginning that Holly’s students are familiar with in order for her to observe the magic & success of the tool without the stress of the early learning stages.
    • DO SET aside plenty of time for learning the tech tool with Holly and the students to maximize success.

Nelly's "TechCess" Language:

A Voice & a Choice combined with Support, Assistance, & Mentoring with some Acknowledgement sprinkled in...

In other words:
Make her feel valued, listened to,  & supported
as she reaches for success.

  • DO TRY to understand Nelly’s negativity. When someone is consistently frustrated and unsuccessful, it creates more frustration resulting in negativity.
  • DO EXPECT that Nelly will benefit more from 1 on 1 contact from whole group or even small group meetings.
  • DO SHARE stories of your own failures with Nelly.
  • DO OFFER Nelly some non-tech options on a regular basis!
  • DO HELP Nelly discover some success as soon as possible.
  • DO TEAM-TEACH with Nelly, letting her take the lead as much as possible but working to fix issues as soon as they appear, increasing opportunities for success.
  • DO SCAFFOLD Nelly’s success by ensuring consistent coaching or team-teaching sessions.
  • DO ASK Nelly to share her positive experiences in a small or whole group setting.
  • DO START with apps and procedures that you are confident will not be glitchy.
  • Some Practical Examples:
    • DO CREATE & SHARE Google docs with students for collaborative writing.
    • DO DEMONSTRATE & CHOOSE apps & tech tools that are known to be successful rather than glitchy.  DO set her up for success!

Fred's "TechCess" Language

Enthusiasm, Excitement, & Engagement mixed with Acknowledgement & Appreciation
with a dash of Mentoring

In Other Words:
Meet him where he is: Excited.  
Give him more, but help him refine his processes
to have even more success with mastery.

  • DO CAPITALIZE on Fred’s enthusiasm & PRAISE him for his current practices.
  • DO HELP Fred set goals.
  • DO LISTEN as Fred explains what he’d like to accomplish.
  • DO HELP Fred identify 2-3 new tech tools per month or per quarter that he’d like to master.
  • DO HELP Fred plan units and lessons that naturally and authentically implement the new technology tools that he is so enthusiastic about.
  • DO ENLIST Fred’s help informally coaching others.
  • Some Practical Examples:
    • DO SUGGEST to Fred that he blog to share his success strategies with others. By blogging, Fred will hopefully begin to really think through what he is doing in his classroom, why he is doing it, and how it can be done better in the future.
    • DO SUGGEST to Fred that he utilize the power of social media by gathering additional ideas on Twitter.
    • DO SUGGEST to Fred that he utilize Evernote, Pocket, Diigo, or another resource collecting application to put some of his ideas into “notebooks” or categories for later.
    • DO demonstrate to Fred some of the organizational power of Gmail or Google Drive for saving and later locating information.

Polly's "TechCess Language"

Enthusiasm, Excitement, & Engagement mixed with Acknowledgment & Appreciation
with a side of support & mentoring

In Other Words:
Capitalize on Polly's enthusiasm and willingness to work with staff by enlisting her as an informal tech coach to help others.


  • DO CAPITALIZE on Polly’s positivity & PRAISE her for current practices.
  • DO HELP Polly set goals.
  • DO LISTEN as Polly explains what she’d like to accomplish.
  • DO HELP Polly identify 2-3 new tech tools per month or per quarter that she’d like to master.
  • DO HELP Polly plan units and lessons that naturally and authentically implement the new technology tools about which she is excited.
  • DO ENLIST Polly’s help informally coaching others.
  • DO INVESTIGATE additional strategies for getting Polly's students engaged.
  • Some Practical Examples:
    • DO ASK Polly to team with Hesitant Holly, making sure Polly understands what strategies to employ Holly to ensure her success.
    • DO SUGGEST to Polly that she utilize the power of social media by gathering additional ideas on Twitter.
    • DO SUGGEST to Polly that she utilize Evernote, Pocket, Diigo, or another resource collecting application to put some of her ideas into “notebooks” or categories for later.
    • DO DEMONSTRATE to Polly some of the organizational power of Gmail or Google Drive for saving and later locating information.
    • DO ASK Polly to host some Professional Learning Community meetings face-to-face, online, or asynchronously online to help others.

Anita's "TechCess Language"

Acknowledgement & Appreciation for Adoption mixed with a Voice & a Choice
with a side of Enthusiastic Support

In Other Words:
Make Anita feel like she already IS a tech coach.  Let her know that you don't know more than she does.  Don't try to "coach" her if she is resistant to that idea. Instead work together to help others, and through that collaboration, her skills will improve--as will yours!

  • DO EXPECT that Anita will benefit from 1 on 1 meetings in lieu of whole group.
  • DO CAPITALIZE on Anita’s experience and success with technology.
  • DO verbally and consistently ACKNOWLEDGE Anita’s early adoption of technology.
    • DO ACKNOWLEDGE Anita’s success in whole group settings.
    • DO ACKNOWLEDGE Anita’s success 1 on 1 with her privately.
    • DO always TREAT Anita like a tech-colleague.
  • DO ASK Anita to help coach others.
    • DO ENSURE that Anita understands some of the strategies for success for individuals.
    • DO ENSURE that Anita understands WHY not everyone is immediately able to integrate technology as she has.
  • DO LISTEN as Anita explains what she’d like to accomplish.
  • DO MAKE informal suggestions to Anita about new discoveries you’ve had with tech tools.
  • Some Practical Examples:
    • DO ASK Anita to help be a coach/trouble-shooter with her colleagues.
    • DO SUGGEST to Anita that she utilize the power of social media by gathering additional ideas on Twitter.
    • DO SUGGEST to Anita that she utilize Evernote, Pocket, Diigo, or another resource collecting application to put some of her ideas into “notebooks” or categories for later.
    • DO SHOW Anita some of the organizational power of Gmail or Google Drive for saving and later locating information.
    • DO ASK Anita to host some Professional Learning Community meetings face-to-face, online, or asynchronously online to help others.
    • DO ASK Anita to help you plan workshops or other learning experiences to either the whole group or small groups.

Robert's "TechCess Language"

Efficiency & Effectiveness to
Streamline & Simplify with a side of
Supportive Enthusiasm & Acknowledgement

In Other Words:
Praise Robert for being a seasoned veteran who works hard to help kids learn.  Find ways to get Robert on board by showing him how technology can make his life easier.  After he's had some success, start slowly introducing him to ways he can easily utilize technology with his students to get them further engaged.

  • DO EXPECT that Robert will benefit from small group or 1 on 1 meetings in lieu of the whole group.
  • DO ACKNOWLEDGE Robert’s successes regularly.
  • DO BEGIN by showing Robert ways he can make his own workflow more efficient.
  • DO ASK Robert to set goals and share them with you.
  • DO LISTEN as Robert explains his perspective and what he’d like to accomplish.
  • DO CAPITALIZE on any of Robert’s goals and find ways to suggest ways that technology tools could be a catalyst for meeting his goals.
  • DO ENCOURAGE Robert to ask questions and be honest about his feelings so you can have open & honest conversations.
  • Some Practical Examples:
    • DO START with apps and procedures that you are confident will not be glitchy.
    • DO START with apps and procedures with which Robert’s students don’t need a lot of instruction in an effort to demonstrate to him that many of the technology tool suggestions you have are easily integratable into his curriculum.
    • DO SCAFFOLD Robert’s success by ensuring consistent coaching or team-teaching sessions.
    • DO ASK Robert to present one of his successes to a small group and then the whole group as soon as possible.

School Culture:
Sharing with Colleagues

  • As technology staff, coaches, or administrators, we do most of the presenting and talking during professional development. People are tired of listening to us!
  • As soon as possible, get your teachers presenting their stories of success or failure with each other.
  • Seeing a colleague--an equal--present on a concept might spur a hesitant or resistant teacher to try something new!
  • Additionally, people who aren't as adept at working with technology might do a better job of explaining the processes they utilized to be successful in a way that other non-tech people would better understand.

Presentations FOR Staff BY Staff

Charlie

If Charlie starts having successes and he is willing to share with others, the benefits will be significant. As other “Charlies” see him experimenting with new tech tools, others might be inspired to get on board, too.

Anita

It’s important to give Anita the accolades for being an early adopter, but remember that many people will see her as almost a tech coach already. If people are used to her presenting, her presentation may not have as big of an impact as someone else.

Polly (or Fred)

Polly is probably someone others like and enjoy. She will be enthusiastic and others will most likely benefit from her stories of success and positivity.

Robert

It’s probably not a secret that Robert is resistant in nature. Seeing him discuss a success or even an attempt at new technology will be eye-opening for many people.  If there are other "Roberts" on staff, they may be less resistant to trying something if he has vetted it and had success first.

Nelly

If Nelly is willing to share something, be sure it is positive!  It will be a wonderful experience for her to speak about the positive and for others to hear and experience her positivity.

Holly

It would be a wonderful stride toward self-confidence and self-efficacy for Holly if she were to share a success with a small or large group.  Others would benefit from her success and gain an understanding that if she can do it, they can, too!

Sometimes all it takes is one Nelly, one Robert, one Charlie, one Holly and others will be willing to try it out, too!

SAMR

My SAMR Acronym

TPACK

A Framework

  • DO share the idea of TPACK with teachers.
  • DO DEMONSTRATE how TPACK clearly shows how THEY as teachers are the experts in the classroom.
  • DO STRESS that technology is just one aspect...just one more tool in their arsenal as they attack the process of helping students learn.

Models for Technology Integration

Which teacher(s) might benefit from this model?

Which teacher(s) might benefit from this model?

Which teacher(s) might benefit from this model?

Coaching Tools/Resources/
Final Thoughts

Question: If time were limited, with whom, on what, or where should a coach focus his/her time?

Thanks for learning with me!

References & Special Thanks

Click on this image to enlarge.