Surgery

As a general rule, a procedure is considered surgical when it involves cutting of a patient's tissues or closure of a previously sustained wound. Other procedures that do not necessarily fall under this rubric, such as angioplasty or endoscopy, may be considered surgery if they involve "common" surgical procedure or settings, such as use of a sterile environment, anesthesia, antiseptic conditions, typical surgical instruments, and suturing or stapling. All forms of surgery are considered invasive procedures; so-called "noninvasive surgery" usually refers to an excision that does not penetrate the structure being excised (e.g. laser ablation of the cornea) or to a radiosurgical procedure (e.g. irradiation of a tumor).

This is what surgery looks like.

What is Surgery?

Surgery is the specialty of medicine that treats diseases and disorders by cutting, removing or changing the body with an operative procedure. There are many reasons to have surgery. Some operations can relieve or prevent pain. Others can reduce a symptom of a problem or improve some body function. Some surgeries are done to find a problem. For example, a surgeon may do a biopsy, which involves removing a piece of tissue to examine under a microscope. Some surgeries, like heart surgery, can save your life.

Surgery is performed by a surgeon, a physician with specialized training in operative procedures.

How is Surgery done?

How can I prepare my self for surgery?

Learn about your surgery and meet with your medical team. Talk to your surgeon and the expert who manages your comfort and care during the operation, your anesthesiologist. Ask them questions about everything, from risks to healing time. Your hospital may offer classes that also can teach you about your procedure.

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