Blizzards

A blizzard is a severe winter weather storm found all over the world. The average wind speed is 35 or more mph. The temperature in a blizzard to take place has to be 10 * F  (-12*C) or below.

How Does a Blizzard Form?

When water vapor (moisture) forms alto stratus (lower level rain/snow clouds), cirrostratus, (high rain clouds,) and nimbostratus clouds (layered rain clouds) and mixes with cold air, that creates precipitation (snow, sleet and rain). When the clouds get to heavy, they let go snow. Lift (strong winds 35 or more miles per hour) blows the snow, sleet, and/or rain to get a blizzard.

What Are Some Examples of Blizzards?

One very famous blizzard was on March 11-14, 1888. The blizzard stretched from Maine to Virginia. There were roughly 1,000 injuries and deaths in all. Because the blizzard was so long ago, there are no recorded finances for the damage. The drifts were up to 50 ft. This blizzard was known as "The Great White Blizzard.

Another example is the blizzard of January 1-3, 1999 this blizzard was located in the Midwest (Wisconsin, Illinois, Minnesota, etc.). There were more than 25 deaths and 75 injuries. Most transportation ways were down, trapping people in there homes and works.   The cost of the blizzard was roughly $500,000.

How Do You Prepare for a Blizzard?

To prepare for a blizzard you should have/do the following

  • Weather radio
  • Watch weather forecast
  • Follow storm tracker on local news
  • Charge all electronic devices
  • Stay inside and off roads
  • Prepare to go with out water and heat for a while
  • Keep watch of snow on roof (cave in could occur)

Bibliography

Works Cited

"Blizzard." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blizzard>.

"Follow These Five Steps To Stay Safe In A Blizzard." Homesite. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <https://www.homesite.com/insurance-resources/home-insurance-articles/five-steps-stay-safe-in-a-blizzard.htm>.

Moran, Joseph M., and Edward J. Hopkins. Wisconsin's Weather and Climate. Madison, WI: U of Wisconsin, 2002. Print.

"NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory." NSSL: Severe Weather 101. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/education/svrwx101/>.

Stewart, Mark. Blizzards and Winter Storms. Pleasantville, NY: Gareth Stevens Pub., 2009. Print.

"UCAR Center for Science Education." UCAR Center for Science Education. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <https://scied.ucar.edu/webweather>.

"Weather Wiz Kids Weather Information for Kids." Weather Wiz Kids Weather Information for Kids. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://weatherwizkids.com/>.

"What Defines a Blizzard?" AccuWeather. Web. 11 Mar. 2015. <http://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/what-is-a-blizzard/5674708>.

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