After reading the article, please reflect on the following questions:

1) How does the information in this article support what you are already doing?

2) Are there areas mentioned in the article that you would consider to be a barrier for technology integration in your learning environment?

3) How do you think having a Professional Development plan might help support your professional growth in the area of technology integration?

Please feel free to comment on others' responses.

Comment Stream

2 years ago
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2 years ago
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The article supports what I am already doing as I try to use every opportunity to integrate technology into my room. I teach music and we have shared technology within our specials team and with the school in general. I have a Smart Board and a desktop computer in my room, but also have access to a set of ipads, chromebooks and laptops at the intermediate level. I have many apps on the ipads that relate to music and there are a lot of great websites that students can use on their own or with the SmartBoard. I am always amazed at how many technological resources are available to enhance and facilitate learning about and creating music. My school is making use of Google Classrooms and that is a goal for me next year.
One of the barriers is the fact that it is shared. We have a calendar to sign up for the various tools, but it requires a lot of forethought and some 'guestimating'. Classes tend to move through lessons at slightly different paces and may not be ready for the technology on the day I have scheduled it. Another barrier is time. We have 40 minute classes and it takes time for our ‘ikids’ to retrieve the carts, distribute items and return them. Another barrier to the use of technology in my class is testing. When there is school wide testing taking place, not only are the resources we normally have access to tied up, but when we do have them, connectivity can be slow.
Having a Professional Development plan can support my own and my students growth by enabling me to have a framework to work within. It can account for my continuing education and communication with other educators. It allows the technology to be used to the fullest extent possible and not go underutilized. It can also create opportunities for collaboration with other educators.

2 years ago
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I completely agree! Even as a tech teacher, I find that with all the rotating of kids it is hard to gauge who is ready for what. And with limited tech resources, sometimes it is really hard to get them a time that you need them. MAP, PARCC, CMAS, etc definitely get in the way as well.

2 years ago
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I'm glad you'll be exploring Google Classroom. Its a great way to provide resources, support and content to large numbers of students (and let their teachers know what is going on too). There should be some Google Classroom classes being taught this summer--keep an eye on the course catalog. :)

2 years ago
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@catebeck As a technology teacher, I integrate multiple facets of technology throughout the year. My classroom has a 1:1 ratio of students:computers which is very fortunate and limits barriers for technology integration. Each computer has the "class appropriate" software for students to apply learned concepts. I enjoyed reading all the provided software examples but also think it's important to find the correct balance. I feel that while the "open source" revolution gave us so many free choices of software(moodle, google classroom, etc..), the act of vetting each one and selecting the best choice became exhausting. There were almost too many choices leading to a lack of standardization. I see this in education as well. Within my school, some teachers use Moodle (inspireEd), while other use Google Classroom for classroom management software. I don't feel this is advantageous. This may be one aspect of a Professional Development plan. Perhaps this plan can be leveraged to plan, learn and try integrating new technology into the classroom. I'm going to try this next semester. Thanks. Good article. I love technology..lol

2 years ago
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We are lucky at Rocky Heights to have mostly 1:1 classrooms. Most students have chromebooks and my classroom has 5 extras available to students. Many of the kids also have smart phones. I liked the set up of the article as it introduced a sort of formula for introducing technology little by little. As a new teacher many of the programs were already being used at my school and many teachers were experimenting with new ones. The benefit to me was that I wasn’t used to any of the programs and would have to experience a learning curve. There is a debate at our school over Edmodo vs. Google Classroom and I am starting to hear things in favor of Google. This is something I would like to use more next year. I started the year using Edmodo but mainly for quizzes and switched to Discovery Education for quizzes and assessments. Professional Development at RHMS has 4 “tracks” with one of them being the “Paperless Classroom”. Having just completed my first full year of teaching I feel I might be ready to tackle moving in this direction where as at the beginning of my first year much of this information sounded amazing but was also so overwhelming. Having a year under my belt and a plan to experiment with a few of the technological tools makes using technology seem less daunting. The students really do get engaged when they can be creative or competitive using their devices.

2 years ago
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I have integrated the use of technology to allow students to collaborate with each other and to create presentations that they can share with other classes. We usually use Google Drive as most of the students are familiar with how to create things in their drive and share them. I find a few hurdles to be time, familiarity of an application and device availability for the younger students. I meet with each class for 40 minutes. I depend on them to bring their Chrome Books with them as I have no dedicated devices to my class. Often times they are coming from lunch, recess or another Special class so they don't have their Chrome Books with them. Going back to their classes to get them takes time. Also relating to time, I don't feel I have the time to teach them about new applications. With that being said, I find technology in my room is only as strong as it is in their main classroom. Grades 3-5 have a 1:1 Chrome Book ratio while grades K-2 have small group sets of iPads and laptops. I have not integrated any technology with the little kids at this point. A Professional Development Plan would be a great thing. It would give me a logical avenue to travel down with regards to technology. I think it would help with the "seamless" integration that the article suggests.