The Destiny of theProtesters

Ian Lord

Mr. Greer

Modern Asia

11/13/14

Will the Hong Kong protesters be slaughtered in the streets in the same manner as they were in Tiananmen square twenty-five years ago? Once again the Communist Party is confronted with democracy protesters. In the past the the CCP has responded with repressive and aggressive actions utilizing their military power. The economy of Hong Kong is at risk with the continuation of these protests. The large stock exchange and ports of Hong Kong could suffer immensely if the Communist Party seizes control of those entities. Investors would become anxious because of the uncertainty that would result in the CCP operating those entities. This would lead to questions of reliability and security, which in turn would decrease the productivity level and hurt profits. What the protesters demand is unattainable and will not be given to them by the CCP. Democracy may become the reality for China, but also the Communist Party could strike down in a totalitarian manner. History repeats itself.

The Hong Kong protesters are demanding political reform within Hong Kong. Democracy is the central issue of the protests. The CCP “has promised that Hong Kong’s top leader can be chosen through universal suffrage” in 2017('Occupy Central,' Dave Urbanski). Recently, the Chinese Communist Party has gone against their word and has tried to control the 2017 Chief Executive Officer elections by narrowing the playing field to candidates that have been selected by the officials in Beijing. The current Chief Executive Officer of Hong Kong believes that “free elections would give poor people too much power”(Protesters March After Leader, C.Y. Leung). These incredibly narrow minded comments expose the true goals of the Chinese Communist Party. They wish to keep control away from the poor and only grant voices to the wealthy. The reason for occupying the business district of Hong Kong is to resist the Communist Party's dominance of the election process. The protesters imagine a better Hong Kong with democracy and educational reform. As one of the most talented musicians to ever live said, “you may say I'm a dreamer but I'm not the only one”(John Lennon).

This quote is used by the Hong Kong protesters to testify that the students have a grasp of their past as a former British colony. The protests signify that there are thousands of dreamers amongst the Hong Kong people.

The Tiananmen Square and Hong Kong protests are similar by having the same types of participants and aggressive actions from the Chinese Communist Party. The Tiananmen Square and Hong Kong protests share the fight for democracy, something that failed to be upheld in 1989 but is being tried once again. In Hong Kong the protests started due to the lack of voice the citizens receive concerning the elections of leaders. The Chief Executive officer is the official leader of Hong Kong. The candidates are selected by the Communist Party in Beijing. This means the CCP has complete control over Hong Kong politics. Similar to 1989, all things revolve around Beijing, “the power hub,” and “China will be the dominant power of the coming century,” with all power coming from Beijing (Will China Keep Growing, Neil Irwin). Both Tiananmen Square and Hong Kong protesters are defiant as the “first wave of troops to enter Beijing … [gave] up … just [like] the armed police in Hong Kong”(WSJ, Orville Schell). The people who occupied Tiananmen Square years ago appear to have re-organized in Hong Kong. The same actions against police have been made. The protesters lift their hands in the air and do not wish to fight, they are peaceful. The attitude of the protesters are quite similar between the two events. The protesters “are not their [(Communist Party's)] enemies. [They] are the people”(NYTimes, Chris Buckley). The protesters of these two events are so similar. Hopefully, for the Hong Kong protesters sake, history will not repeat itself.

The Chinese Communist Party will continue to dominate and oppress the generational protesters with the same brutal actions as used in the past, reminiscent of Mao's suppression of Tiananmen Square protesters. The CCP has all the power to end the Hong Kong protests similar to the Tiananmen Square protests, with bloodshed and havoc. The Party has not responded to the demands of the protesters and acts nonchalant about the protests. History repeats itself and since the Tiananmen Square protests have been censored from the people. The protesters are not aware of the past and the cruelness of the Communist Party they are opposing.

Work cited page

  1. "Giant ‘Occupy Central’ Protest Underway in Hong Kong - and China’s Communist Regime Is the Target." The Blaze. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2014.
  2. Buckley, Chris, and Alan Wong. "Crackdown on Protests by Hong Kong Police Draws More to the Streets." The New York Times. The New York Times, 28 Sept. 2014. Web. 14 Nov. 2014.
  3. Sheehan, Matt. "Hong Kong Protesters March After Leader Says Democracy Gives Poor Too Much Power." The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 22 Oct. 2014. Web. 13 Nov. 2014.
  4. Schell, Orville. "Will China Crush the Hong Kong Protests." The Wall Street Journal. Dow Jones & Company, 5 Oct. 2014. Web. 13 Nov. 2014.
  5. Irwin, Neil. "Why China Won’t Keep Growing Fast Forever." The New York Times. The New York Times, 25 Oct. 2014. Web. 13 Nov. 2014.

Comment Stream

2 years ago
0

This would lead to questions of reliability and security which, in turn, would decrease the productivity level and hurt profits. COMMAS

2 years ago
0

SENTENCE STRUCTURE: Avoid beginning with this.

2 years ago
0

WORDY: Recently, the Chinese Communist Party has gone against their word and has tried to control the 2017 Chief Executive Officer elections by narrowing the playing field to candidates that have been selected by the officials in Beijing.