Week 3 | ECI 512

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Required Materials

KOLB | Cell Phones in the Classroom | READ Chapter 3  

BARNES | Teaching the iStudent | READ Chapters 6 & 7

Using Texting to Promote Learning and Literacy

Cell Phones in the Classroom: Are we Dialing up Disaster?

7 Ways You Can Use Texting to Your Advantage in the Classroom

***No Flipgrid this week.

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PLEARN (PLay to Learn to PLan) with TEXTING Type APPs

  • Celly
    Celly is a great app that can be used for educational purposes and in the class environment. With the help of Celly, classrooms can take quizzes, get news/updates, take notes, and organize study groups. It also enables students to share their thoughts with their peers or teachers regarding the class topics.
  • Classpager
    ClassPager is the only web site designed specifically for teachers to text or poll message back and forth with students and parents. It's safe, free, and easy. No one ever sees anyone else's phone number!
  • Remind
    This is a great app that allows teachers to send their parents or students one-way messages and/or emails without sharing phone numbers. If the parents need informing about their child’s behavior, the teacher can just pop an email with confidence. Then there’s the best part: it’s free for teachers!
  • Study Boost
    Why not boost studying with study boost?! This app allows students to study through sms-based quizzes. Teachers can make multiple choice or open-ended questions and take quizzes using the instant messaging service.
  • Poll Everywhere
    Need a poll in the class? Use Poll everywhere to give your students questions which they will be able to respond to using their mobile phones, twitter, or web browsers. The app will quickly calculate the results and compile it into a PowerPoint presentation right away.
  • YOUR CHOICE
    If you come across or know of another texting apps that are great for student learning and personalization. PLEARN away!
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TWEET Your Favorite Text App

TWEET your NEW favorite texting app and WHY (BE specific) using @MobileNCSU.

COMPLETE by Friday.

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TEXTING & LEARNING Visual Analogy

THINK about the potential and challenges texting can bring to learning and teaching.  

LOCATE a CC appropriate image that represents your thinking/analogy. Consider using CC Free IMAGES @ http://www.photosforclass.com/

UPLOAD your image AND rationale (what is the analogy you are making?) in COMMENT STREAM below (Please enter your FULL NAME when leaving comment)

COMPLETE by Friday of this week. Feedback rubric @ https://goo.gl/MBHUVQ

Comment Stream

View Older Posts
2 years ago
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I chose this image because using texting in the learning setting is scary for a lot of teachers. It is kind of like going down this tunnel. We cannot see where we are going. Thus, a lot of teachers are afraid to use texting because it is an uncharted territory. So many questions are brought up about texting within the classroom. How do we use it? How do we keep kids safe? This tunnel is kind of like those feelings about texting. It's the same thing...that's why I chose this analogy. The dark tunnel represents the unknown that comes with adopting new technologies. But, once you have been down this tunnel once you don't feel as scared. This is the same thing for using technology once you have used it you don't feel as scared about using it again.

2 years ago
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2 years ago
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I chose an image of Spiderman, because a recurring theme in the Spiderman mythos is that "with great power comes great responsibility". This is reflected in our use of texting in the classroom. Based on our readings this week, we can use texting to achieve a myriad of possibilities, but this power has to be tempered by also teaching our students to be good digital citizens and realizing that it does add another layer to our classroom management. We have to be as diligent in our education or use as we are in our integration of the technology to create dynamic lessons.

2 years ago
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2 years ago
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Using technology in the classroom helps eliminate all obstacles that most students face. Students that feel they don't fit in will now be welcomed because this is another for of communication. Students that normally don't talk to each other will possibly form new relationships. Students will introduce each other to new things they may have never learned about unless this happened. ETC!!!!

2 years ago
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2 years ago
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I start every semester teaching about the Anglo-Saxons and, of course, Beowulf. On that first day of class, I ask my students a question: "Are monsters real?" This usually leads to some pretty good conversations and, even better, debates/arguments. So, once they all have input we define "monster." What is it that people are truly afraid of? Generally they come to the conclusion that it is the unknown (or some version of that). That is where my thinking falls concerning using texting (and mobile learning in general) in teaching and learning. It's a kind-of monster. I particularly like this image of a monster because look at all the information that is there for the taking, ... learning, ... absorbing, ... and using. All you have to do is explore -- be brave and try. BUT, many folks are afraid of what students may find if they go exploring on their own. They are more comfortable with what they already know. It is unknown, and so it scares some folks; but if you look closely it has so much potential.

6 months ago
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6 months ago
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The power in the smallest hands Children now have smartphones, and I must admit that I am jealous. Engel and Green report that >according to the research report Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8- to 18-year olds sponsored by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 66 percent of the 2,000 U.S. students (ages 8-18) surveyed indicated owning a cell phone> (p.39). These devices afford even the youngest students to research, collect evidence of their learning, self-reflect, collaborate, participate in ARS, and interact with others. Smartphones give students opportunities to practice literacy skills through texting, for digital storytelling, for accessing educational apps for drill and practice, gaming, etc., and for learning how to leave a positive digital footprint.

6 months ago
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The challenge of mLearning with smartphones, just as Engel and Green illustrate, is that not ALL students have them. >Issues of technology ownership as well as accessibility of students with disabilities should be addressed as part of the implementation of this type of model> (p.43) Considerations for alternative demonstrations of learning based on student accessibility and learning styles should always be made, particularly when planning for out-of-school activities.