COOKIES

DOES AND DONT'S

A informational site on cookies

Drop cookies

Rolled cookies

Ice box cookies

Molded cookies

Bar cookies

WHEN CUTTING BARS MAKE SURE KNIFE IS SHARP... DULL KNIFES ARE THE NUMBER ONE CAUSE OF KITCHEN INJURES

pressed cookies

ALWAYS REMEMBER WHEN TAKING PANS OUT OF OVEN TO WEAR HOT GLOVES SO THAT YOU DON'T BURN YOURSELF.

Chewy cookies

High moisture content determine the chewiness of a cookie ; so the recipe, baking time, and temperature must be adjusted to retain moisture. Binding the water in butter, eggs, and brown sugar (it contains molasses, which is 10 percent water) with flour slows its evaporation. The dough needs a little extra flour, which makes it stiffer.

Sugar caramelizes: At its hottest areas—the edges and the underbelly in direct contact with the baking dish—sugar granules melt together, turning into a liquid before starting to caramelize and brown, producing rich, sweet flavors. There's more to sugar than just sweetness! The type of sugar you use and its method of incorporation can have a profound effect on the finished cookies. White sugar is crystallized sucrose, a saccharine consisting of a fructose molecule and a glucose molecule linked together. It is mildly gyroscopic (that is, it likes to retain moisture), and relatively neutral in pH.Brown sugar is mostly crystallized sucrose, but also contains a good amount of glucose and fructose, along with trace minerals that give it its flavor and a slightly acidic pH. Glucose and fructose are far more gyroscopic than sucrose.

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