Chemical Bonds


Chemical Bonds

Forces that hold two or more atoms together.


Atoms with high potential energy are more excited, making them more likely to form chemical bonds, while atoms with a lower potential energy are less excited and more stable, making them less likely to form chemical bonds.


Ionic bonds are chemical bonds between a metal and a nonmetal.

Ionic bonds are formed by electron transfer from metal to nonmetal.

Can conduct electricity as a liquid.

An example of this kind of bond would be Salt (NaCl).


Covalent bonds are chemical bonds between two nonmetals.

There is two different types of Covalent bonds, Polar and Non-Polar.

Never conduct electricity.

An example would be Carbon Dioxide.


Polar Covalent bonds are chemical bonds between two atoms with a significant difference between their electronegativity values.


Non-Polar bonds are chemical bonds between two atoms with a small difference between their electronegativity values.


Metallic bonds are chemical bonds between two metals.

In this type of bond, electrons move freely, because they are de-localized.

Can conduct as a solid.

An example of this would be all elements in the d block (Fe, Au, Cu, etc.).


The octet rule :

Atoms wish to achieve stability by sustaining a total of 8 valence electrons, with the exception of Boron, which only needs 6 valence electrons.



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