The Sugar Glider

by Alexis Jones & Jalen Cobb

Kingdom:Animalia

Phylum:Chordata

Class:Mammalia

Order:Multituberculata

Family:Ptilodontidae

Genus:Ptilodus

Size and Weight- up to 18 inches long and a few pounds

Diet- omnivorous

distinguishing characteristic -small size flexible toes prehensile

tail

Ptilodus was a typical member of this breed, a small, tree-dwelling mammal of the Palaeocene epoch (right after the extinction of the dinosaurs) that wasn't much different from its Mesozoic ancestors. To judge by its prehensile tail, grasping claws and flexible feet and legs, Ptilodus made its living much like a modern squirrel, scampering up and down trees in search of tasty fruits, nuts and bugs. This prehistoric mammal is represented by seven species, which ranged all across the North American continent.

The sugar glider is native to eastern and northern mainland Australia, and was introduced to Tasmania. It is also native to various islands in the region


Kingdom:Animalia

Phylum:Chordata

Class:Mammalia

Infraclass:Marsupialia

Order:Diprotodontia

Family:Petauridae

Genus:Petaurus

Species:P. breviceps

Subspecies:P.b. ariel, Gould 1842
P.b. breviceps, Waterhouse 1838
P.b. longicaudatus, Longman 1924
P.b. papuanus, Thomas 1888

The sugar glider has a squirrel-like body with a long, partially (weakly)[12] prehensile tail. The males are larger than the females and have bald patches on their head and chest; their length from the nose to the tip of the tail is about 24 to 30 cm (12–13 inches, the body itself is approx. 5–6 inches). A sugar glider has a thick, soft fur coat that is usually blue-grey; some have been known to be yellow, tan or (rarely) albino.[a] A black stripe is seen from its nose to midway on its back. Its belly, throat, and chest are cream in colour.

The sugar glider is native to eastern and northern mainland Australia, and was introduced to Tasmania. It is also native to various islands in the region

eat many other foods when available, such as nectar, acacia seeds, bird eggs, pollen, fungi and native fruits.

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