White Fang Imagery

Dark spruce forest frowned on either side the frozen water-way. The trees had been stripped by a recent wind of their white covering of frost, and they seemed to lean toward each other, black and ominous, in the fading light. A vast silence reigned over the land. The land itself was a desolation, lifeless, without movement, so lone and cold that the spirit of it was not even that of sadness. There was a hint in it of laughter, but of a laughter more terrible than any sadness, a laughter that was as mirthless as the smile of a Sphinx, a laughter cold as the frost and partaking of the grimness of infallibility (Chapter 1, The Trail of the Meat)

On the sled, in the box, lay a third man whose toil was over, - a man whom the Wild had conquered and beaten down until he would never move nor struggle again. It is not the way of the Wild to like movement. Life is an offense to it, for life is movement; and the Wild aims always to destroy movement. ( Chapter 1,The Trail of Meat)

He kept the fire brightly blazing, for he knew that it alone intervened between the flesh of his body and their hungry fangs. His two dogs stayed close by him, one on either side, leaning against him for protection, crying and whimpering, and at times snarling desperately when a wolf approached a little closer then usual. At such moments, when his dogs snarled, the whole circle would be agitated, the wolves coming to their feet, and pressing tentatively forward, a chorus of snarlsand eager yelps rising above him. (Chapter 3, The Hunger Cry)

With his one eye the elder saw his opportunity. He darted in low and closed with his fangs. It was a long, ripping slash, and deep as well. His teeth, in passing, burst the wall of the great vein of the throat. Then he leaped clear. The young leader  snarled terribly, but his snarl broke mid most into a tickling cough. Bleeding and coughing already stricken, he sprang at the elder and fought while life faded from him, his legs going weak beneath him, the light of day dulling in his eyes, his blows and springs falling shorter and shorter. (Chapter 4, The Battle of the Fangs)

One Eye sprang back with a snort of sudden fright, then shrank down to the snow and crouched, snarling threats at this thing of fear he did not understand. But the She-Wolf coolly thrust past him. She poised for a moment, then sprang for the dancing rabbit. She, too, soared high, but not so high as the quarry, and her teeth clipped emptily together with a metallic snap. ( Chapter 4, The Battle of the Fangs)

Comment Stream

2 years ago
0

This is a awesome tackk dude!

2 years ago
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I really liked how you took the imagery from the beginning of the story because it has been almost a month since we read that and it was nice to get a recap of the first few chapters. The first passage was had some really great imagery so I could see why you would've picked that one, and I really liked the second one because it showed how hard it really was to live out in the wild like Bill and Henry did. The third passage that you did was really a great example of how the dogs would try to survive. I think that the fourth passage had the best imagery out of all of the passages that were selected and really showed what was going on in that part of the novel. Lastly the fifth was a nice way to end your tackk and showed great imagery.

2 years ago
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In the first passage, I liked how there were so many similes because they really allow you to create an image in your mind while reading. I think the second one was a great at showing the reader how harsh the wilderness really is. The third passage didn't really have as much imagery but it still gave a clearer example of how the wolf may sound. In the fourth passage I love how detailed this paragraph is because it is neat how Jack London describes the death. lastly, I don't think that the 5th passage really had a lot of imagery and was a bit more of telling.

2 years ago
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I agree with Megan, you did a really nice job!👍 I also used the paragraph for an example that described the landscape where Bill and Henry were. (Chapter 1) The sentence "The land itself was a desolation, lifeless, without movement, so lone and cold that the spirit of it was not even that of sadness." really shows instead of tells. The words "metallic snap" in your last paragraph from chapter 4,(The Battle of the Fangs) reminded me of my own puppy, and whenever she would make that sound if someone in my family had to take something from her that she was chewing on, and that she would make a final grab for as we were pulling it away.🐶 (puppies chew on EVERYTHING :) Good Job!😄