Five Tips to Make Smart Choices About Assisted Living

Many seniors find themselves in an in-between land, where they are still capable of handling most of the daily tasks of living independently but may need help with housekeeping, preparing meals, or managing medications. If family members are unable to provide ongoing help, your loved one may fear that they will be forced to exchange their independence for 24-hour medical supervision in a skilled nursing facility. Luckily, there’s an alternative: assisted living.

How can you make smart choices about the assisted living facility you choose for yourself or a loved one? Consider these five tips, many of which are the same factors assisted living brokerage clients would consider when looking to buy an assisted living or skilled nursing facility.

1. Make Sure Assisted Living is Appropriate

An assisted living facility provides a monitored living environment, housekeeping, medication management, all of you meals, assistance with transportation and help with the activities of daily living. The more independent residents have the option to handle the majority of daily activities on their own. Seniors with serious medical issues and those who are restricted in their ability to take care of themselves may be better suited for a skilled senior care facility, which offers skilled supervision and will have medical staff members to handle residents’ needs.

2. Carefully Observe the Facility When You Visit

It’s easy to be swayed by an elegant foyer and a lovely chandelier in the dining room, but use the same critical eye you would if you were a buyer looking at residential care homes for sale. Are all of the rooms clean and in good condition? Are furnishings, doors, and windows in good shape? Are there safety features like grab bars located throughout the facility? Are there anti-slip flooring materials everywhere a resident is likely walk? Overall, do you get the impression that it is well maintained?

3. Carefully Observe the Staff When You Visit

Turn your attention to interactions between staff members and residents. Are they friendly, cheerful, and respectful? Would you be comfortable if you were routinely talked to in the same way the residents are?

4. Look for Places Where Residents Gather

Are there places provided for easy socializing and planned activities for residents? Residents should not be reluctant to leave their rooms. If recreation spaces are empty, it could also mean the facility is not full, which does not bode well for its financial stability and may indicate that there are issues that lead other seniors to choose to live elsewhere.

5. Ask to Review the State Surveys & Admissions Agreement

If the administrator is reluctant to share this information , consider it a warning sign, just as a health care brokerage professional would. The annual State surveys will show you and your family if the facility is in compliance with the State rules and regulations. The residence Admission Agreement will explain the rules explain fees, costs, and residents’ rights. It will also outline expectations about medical reassessments and circumstances when a resident may be asked to move to a facility that could provide medical services and supervision that the assisted living facility does not. These documents will help you compare costs and offerings with other assisted living facilities.