Reading for Writing

EXTRACTS

An extract from Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.

However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered as the rightful property of some one or other of their daughters.

‘My dear Mr Bennet,’ said his lady to him one day, ‘have you heard that Netherfield Park is let at last?’

Mr Bennet replied that he had not.

‘But it is,’ returned she; ‘for Mrs Long has just been here, and she told me all about it.’

Mr Bennet made no answer.

‘Do you not want to know who has taken it?’ cried his wife impatiently.

‘You want to tell me, and I have no objection to hearing it.’

This was invitation enough.

‘Why, my dear, you must know, Mrs Long says that Netherfield is taken by a young man of large fortune from the north of England; that he came down on Monday in a chaise and four to see the place, and was so much delighted with it that he agreed with Mr Morris immediately; that he is to take possession before Michelmas, and some of his servants are to be in the house by the end of next week.’

‘What is his name?’

‘Bingley.’

‘Is he married or single?’

‘Oh! single, my dear, to be sure! A single man of large fortune; four or five thousand a-year. What a fine thing for our girls!’

‘How so? How can it affect them?’

‘My dear Mr Bennet,’ replied his wife. ‘how can you be so tiresome! Ypu must know that I am thinking of his marrying one of them'

‘Is that his design in settling here?’

‘Design! Nonsense, how can you talk so! But it is very likely that he may fall in love with one of them, and therefore you must visit him as soon as he comes.’

‘I see no occasion for that. You and the girls may go, or you may send them by themselves, which perhaps will be still better, for you are as handsome as any of them, Mr Bingley might like you the best of the party.’

‘My dear, you flatter me. I certainly have had my share of beauty, but I do not pretend to be anything extraordinary now. When a woman has five grown-up daughters, she ought to give over thinking of her own beauty.’

‘In such cases, a woman has not often much beauty to think of.’

‘But, my dear, you must indeed go and see Mr Bingley when he comes into the neighbourhood.’

‘It is more than I engage for, I assure you.’

‘But consider your daughters. Only think what an establishment it would be for one of them. Sir William and Lady Lucas are determined to go, merely on that account, for in general you know they visit no new comers. Indeed you must go, for it will be impossible for us to visit him if you do not.’

‘You are over scrupulous, surely. I dare say Mr Bingley will be very glad to see you; and I will send a few lines by you to assure him of my hearty consent to his marrying which ever he chuses of the girls; though I must throw in a good word for my little Lizzy.’

‘I desire you to do no such thing. Lizzy is not a bit better than the others; and I am sure she is not half so handsome as Jane, nor half so good humoured as Lydia. But you are always giving her the preference.’

‘They have none of them much to recommend them,’ replied he; ‘they are all silly and ignorant, like other girls; but Lizzy has something more of quickness than her sisters.’

‘Mr Bennet, how can you abuse your own children in such a way? You take delight in vexing me. You have no compassion on my poor nerves.’

‘You may mistake me, my dear. I have a high respect for your nerves. They are my old friends. I have heard you mention them with consideration these twenty years at least.’

‘Ah! You do not know what I suffer.’

‘But I hope you will get over it, and live to see many young men of four thousand a year come into the neighbourhood.’

‘It will be of no use to us, if twenty should come, since you will not visit them.’

‘Depend upon it, my dear, that went there are twenty, I will visit them all.’

Mr Bennet was so odd a mixture of quick parts, sarcastic humour, reserve, and caprice, that the experience of three and twenty years had been insufficient to make his wife understand his character. Her mind was less difficult to develope. She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper. When she was discontented, she fancied herself nervous. The business of her life was to get ther daughters married; its solace was visiting and news.

Extracted from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, published by Vintage.

Comment Stream

2 years ago
0

:o)

2 years ago
0


Read the text and choose the correct answers: A,B or C. ( 5x2=10 pts)

GAP YEARS
This year about 150,000 young people in the United Kingdom will take a ‘gap year’. A gap year is a break between school and university, or between school and starting work in a profession. For most young people, it will be a chance to travel and have interesting experiences.
So how do young people spend their time? A lot of students finance their gap yearby working in the countries they visit and some do voluntary work. Here are three young people who are going to do very different things.

A ‘Next year, I’m going to study physics at university. Before then, I want to spend some time abroad and do something completely different. I’ve got a student work visa for Thailand and I’m going to work at an animal rescue center for 9 months. It will be a demanding job. My responsibilities will be to help to look after the animals and I will also show visitors around the center. It will be a great experience.’ Jackie

B ’ Next summer, I’m going to start a job at a sports center-it will be my first full time job. But before that, I want to take a break and go abroad and I found the ideal job for me with Gap Sports. I’m going to live in Ghana, in Africa, for 6 months and work as a school basketball coach. It will be a really rewarding experience. As the company’s website says I won’t just teach sport, I’ll probably help with other lessons in school too.’ Oliver

C ’ I’m going to start work next October. It’s an office job, a post in a bank. Before that, I want to spend a few months working with my hands outdoors. So I have volunteered to work with a charity called Concordia. I’m going to help to restore an old castle in the west of France. There will be 16 other young people from other countries, so it will be a great way to make friends and learn about other cultures. And it’ll be a great opportunity to practice my French too!’ Darren


1. A gap year is………….
A a chance to start the new profession.
B a year away from work or study, usually spent in another country.
C the first year at university.

2. Jackie is going to…………….
A study in Thailand.
B take animals to and rescue center.
C do different things at an animal rescue center.


3. Oliver’s job in Ghana………….
A will possibly give him the chance to teach different things.
B is completely different from the job he will have at the sports center.
C can’t be found on the Internet.

4. Darren doesn’t want……..
A to work in an office in six months’ time.
B to speak English all the time.
C to work outside in France.

5. Darren is…………
A not going to receive any money for his bank job.
B going to travel to lots of countries.
C going to work on an old building.

2 years ago
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bu programı kullanır mıyım bilmiyorum. sanırım derslerimde yeri geldiğinde alternatiflerini araştırıp kullanırım. Ben yönetmeliyim program değil

2 years ago
0