Brazil

"Aerial view of Rio de Janeiro." Photos/Illustrations. Corel. World Geography: Understanding a Changing World.

ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 28 Oct. 2014.

Brief History:

Brazil,the largest country in South America and one of the most biodiverse nations in the world, encompasses most of the Amazon rain forest as well as other ecological regions. Its border touches every south American country with the exception of Chile and Ecuador. The eastern coast of Brazil on the Atlantic ocean covers some 4,500 miles of lagoons, tropical beaches, national harbors, and coral reefs. The majority of Brazil is dominated by the Amazon basin and the county's central highlands region. The basin includes the Amazon river, by volume the largest river in the world and quite possibly the longest."Brazil: Landforms & Climate." World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 1 Nov. 2014.

Religion:

In essence, Brazil is a Roman Catholic country; in fact it is the largest on earth in terms of population (and the second largest Christian country in the world). However, it is also a country in which many people also practice a second religion. Roughly three-quarters of Brazilians consider themselves Catholic, even if the proportion of those actively practicing the religion is significantly lower. This is illustrated by a popular Brazilian saying, which states that "a man needs to go to church three times in his life—to be baptized, to marry, and to die." Brazil's Catholic Church has seen internal conflict in recent decades, in particular as a result of the growing importance and outspokenness of the progressive wing of the Church.

Edwards, Todd L. "Brazil: People." World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 1 Nov. 2014.

Language:

Portuguese is the world's seventh most widely spoken language (or eighth, if non-native speakers are counted). While the language lacks the commercial importance of English or the political importance of Russian or Chinese, it is nonetheless one of the world's major languages. For Brazilians, language is a vital component of their cultural identity.

Brazilian Portuguese is now remarkably different than the Portuguese spoken in Europe; in fact there are actually bilingual dictionaries to help speakers of the two versions of Portuguese bridge the gap. Brazilian Portuguese is a relatively open language like American English—new words enter the vocabulary relatively easily, in stark contrast to languages like French that attempt to avoid the "corruption" associated with non-French words.

Edwards, Todd L. "Brazil: People." World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 1 Nov. 2014.

Creative expression (sports):

Called futbol in Brazil, soccer is without a doubt a top national pastime. Rio de Janeiro also boasts the world's largest soccer stadium, called the Maracana. Brazilian soccer started in the 1890s. While the English invented the game, many soccer aficionados argue that Brazil perfected it. Brazil has for sure perfected its own style of soccer, which has become known internationally as the jogo bonito, or beautiful game, a style of play that combines exuberance with spontaneity. The world's most famous soccer player, Pelé, is Brazilian. Some 200,000 loyal fans filled the Maracana to watch Pelé play his last game before retirement. Loyalty to teams is fierce, games are loud and often emotional, and celebrations of victory often spontaneous, with singing, dancing, drum beating and the like. Brazil's best players quite often become international celebrities, and Brazilians are likely to follow the overseas careers of their favorite players.

Edwards, Todd L. "Brazil: Traditions & Etiquette." World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2014. Web. 1 Nov. 2014.



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