THE HINDENBURG DISASTER

An airship exploded suddenly and at the time, without reason, killing 36 people.

The Hindenburg Disaster occurred May 6, 1937 in Lakehurst, NJ.

What is the Hindenburg Disaster? Pretty much, a rigid airship called "The Hindenburg" was attempting to land in a storm and suddenly explosion after explosion occurred. The airship quickly became covered in flames and fell to the ground. Only the metal skeleton was left of the Hindenburg, and 36 people died out of the 97 on board.

Below is the news report of the Hindenburg Disaster. This was the first disaster to be caught on film and audio.

At the time, scientists were debating why the airship exploded. Modern scientists say it was most likely because the electricity in the storm caused the hydrogen in the Hindenburg to ignite.

This horrible disaster would not have occurred if the majestic Hindenburg had been filled with helium. Unfortunately, the Hindenburg was going from Germany to the U.S., and Germany didn't have any helium yet. If the U.S. has been able to supply helium to Germany,  

The Hindenburg Disaster was a shock to the whole world. This was a totally unexpected event, and the Hindenburg had made 20 successful flights before. The Hindenburg was one of the largest airship of its time, measuring 804 feet long, 135 feet long, and 250 tons. It was also one of the first passenger airships.

Airships were getting more common, but after the Hindenburg Disaster, the popularity of airships fell, and today blimps are mostly used for advertising, and they are very uncommon. Overall, the Hindenburg Disaster was a horrid tragedy that effectively ended the era of lighter-than-air travel.

WORKS CITED

NEWSPAPER http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth2559...

"The Crosbyton Review. (Crosbyton, Tex.), Vol. 29, No. 20, Ed. 1 Friday, May 14, 1937, Sequence: 2 | The Portal to Texas History." The Crosbyton Review [Crosbyton, TX] 14 May 1937, 1st ed.: n. pag. The Crosbyton Review. (Crosbyton, Tex.), Vol. 29, No. 20, Ed. 1 Friday, May 14, 1937, Sequence: 2 | The Portal to Texas History. The Portal to Texas History. Web. 08 May 2015.

ARTICLE 1: FACTS ON FILE  http://online.infobase.com/HRC/Search/Details/194...

Hanses, Mathias. "Hindenburg disaster." Disasters, Accidents, and Crises in American History. New York: Facts On File, 2008. American History Online. Web. 10 May 2015.

ARTICLE 2: WORLD BOOK http://classic.worldbookonline.com/advanced/articl...

Bednarek, Janet R. "Hindenburg." World Book Advanced. World Book, 2015. Web. 8 May 2015.

ARTICLE 3: ABC-CLIO http://americanhistory.abc-clio.com/Search/Display...

McCallum, Lisa. "Hindenburg explosion." American History. ABC-CLIO, 2015. Web. 7 May 2015.

IMAGE 1: GOOGLE SEARCH http://www.historyinanhour.com/wp-content/uploads/...

IMAGE 2: GOOGLE SEARCH http://images.rapgenius.com/3d2d6ed2534920a2f6bff2...

IMAGE 3: GOOGLE SEARCH

IMAGE 4: GOOGLE SEARCH http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/05/10/article-...

BACKGROUND IMAGE http://www.dream-wallpaper.com/free-wallpaper/phot...

HINDENBURG VIDEO http://classic.worldbookonline.com/advanced/extmed...

"Hindenburg explosion." Online vd. World Book Advanced. World Book, 2015. Web. 11 May 2015.

BOOK 1 https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=U_Etqu...

Sherman, Jill. "Chapter 1 "Oh! The Humanity!"" The Hindenburg Disaster. Edina, Minnesota: ABDO, 2010. 7. Print.