Ecosystems

Marine Ecosystems

Marine ecosystems are the biggest ecosystems, which cover around 71% of Earth's surface and contain 97% of out planet's water. Water in Marine ecosystems features in high amounts minerals and salts dissolved in them. Many kinds of organisms live in marine ecosystems: the brown algae, corals, cephalopods, echinoderms, dinoflagellates and sharks.

Forest Ecosystems

They are the ecosystems in which an abundance of flora, or plants, is seen so they have a big number of organisms which live in relatively small space. Therefore, in forest ecosystems the density of living organisms is quite high. A small change in this ecosystem could affect the whole balance, effectively bringing down the whole ecosystem.

Desert Ecosystems

Desert ecosystems are located in regions that receive an annual rainfall less than 25. They occupy about 17 percent of all the land on our planet. Due to the extremely high temperature, low water availability and intense sunlight, fauna and flora are scarce and poorly developed. The vegetation is mainly shrubs, bushes, few grasses and rare trees.

Mountain Ecosystems

Mountain land provides a scattered and diverse array of habitats where a large number of animals and plants can be found. At the higher altitudes, the harsh environmental conditions normally prevail, and only the treeless alpine vegetation can survive.

Grassland Ecosystems

Grasslands are located in both the tropical and temperate regions of the world though the ecosystems vary slightly. The area mainly comprises grasses with a little number of trees and shrubs. The main vegetation includes grasses, plants and legumes that belong to the composite family.

Mushrooms are decomposers, they grow on trees and degrade the bark.
Animals that eat plants and greens are primary consumers.
Whales are part of the marin ecosystem.
Producers are organisms that can make their own food, like plants.
Producers are at the bottom of the food chain.
The two tigers fought for food during the drought. This is a biotic factor.
The racoons were hiding in their den because it was raining. This is an abiotic factor.
The fish species grew a new set of fins due to were they were living. This is callede adaption.

Abiotic factors in a wetland ecosystem  are sunlight, air, climate, soil, water, rocks, and temperature. Biotic factors in a wetland ecosystem are turtlehead flowers, water, trees, butterflires, competition, bacteria, carrying capacity, plaintain, ash, and the false foxglove.

Wetland Ecosystem

Energy enters the ecosystem through the sun.

The arrows in the above example explain which consumer is next in line on the food chain.

If one thing from the ecosystem was eleminated then it would much harder for one of the consumers to find something to consume.

As the runoff water passes through, the wetlands retain excess nutrients and some pollutants, and reduce sediment that would clog waterways and affect fish and amphibian egg development.

Wetlands function as natural sponges that trap and slowly release surface water, rain, snowmelt, groundwater and flood waters.

Wetland plants hold the soil in place with their roots, absorb the energy of waves, and break up the flow of stream or river currents.

Many species depend on the wetlands' resourses to survive.

Wetlands have recreational, historical, scientific, and cultural values. We use a wealth of natural products from wetlands, including fish and shellfish, blueberries, cranberries, timber, and wild rice, as well as medicines that are derived from wetland soils and plants.

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