Swahili City-States

http://www.worldhistoryatlas.com/images/U05/AWHcom12_M_U05_Swahili.gif

The Swahili City-States are located off and along of the Eastern coast of Africa.

The Swahili City-States were apart of a very complex trading system. Some goods that they were supposed to provide include ivory, animal skins, copper, iron, and rare woods. Gold was also included in this list. In fact, gold was the hottest commodity to come out of this area. Slaves were also traded though they are not technically goods.

Anglin, Jay Pascal., and William James. Hamblin. World History to 1648. New York, NY: HarperPerennial, 1993. Print.

http://ibnbattuta.berkeley.edu/4eastafrica.html

Most of the trade that was done in the region was completed primarily by boat. The Swahili City-States were a cluster of small port cities that allowed goods to be imported in and out of Africa. They imported pottery, glass, cloth, weapons, and silk from China. Most of the goods that were exported from these ports were from interior Africa.

Anglin, Jay Pascal., and William James. Hamblin. World History to 1648. New York, NY: HarperPerennial, 1993. Print.

http://jb-hdnp.org/Sarver/Maps/WC/wc14_eafricantradem.jpg

The economy in the Swahili City-States was based on hunting, fishing, and trade. These city-states became very powerful during its time period due to its ports. Merchants were particularly interested in these ports, causing the the coasts to expand commercially. Most of these city-states wealth came from international trade.

"Indian Ocean Trade: A Classroom Simulation." BU African Studies Centre. Boston University, n.d. Web. <http://www.bu.edu/africa/files/2011/11/Indian-Ocean-Trade.pdf>.

The Swahili-City States were one of the many stopping places to international trade. Their role was the middle man. Their function would be to receive goods from the middle of Africa and then ship them out to the Middle East. Then those goods would be shipped to Asia.

Anglin, Jay Pascal., and William James. Hamblin. World History to 1648. New York, NY: HarperPerennial, 1993. Print.

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