From Mythical to Statistical

“Didn’t we stop going to the Moon because it had become boring?”

As children we are taught to use our imagination. We are expected to come up with things out of this world and undeniably not possible. Often time when a child asks a question, instead of a thought out and educational explanation, they are told to "use their imagination". As adults, we are taught to look at the facts. We are taught to challenge everything and back up our every thought with research, stats, citations, and evidence for what we are claiming. Nobody asks a child to come up with proof for their imaginary friend, their dish rag that becomes  a cape, or even their teddy bear who has explicit feelings and personality.

Somewhere along the lines we are taught that science is necessary and that we can't just make things up. Why did we stop going to the moon? Had we discovered new things that are worth our time? Going to the moon is now an obstacle of the past. People are now focusing on proving other things that their imagination leads them to believe - such as water on Mars or mermaids in the sea. There will always be something that our imagination wants to believe is true, and the use of science to prove it will always be needed - otherwise people might simply deem you as crazy, rather than as a child with an extraordinary imagination.

Comment Stream

2 years ago
0

I agree with you a lot. I think that we need science to have imaginations and vice versa. Scientific work stems from human curiosity, and without the belief in something more, we would never find the facts we have. Take the giant squid for example. People believed it was a myth for a long time until science discovered it. It's the same principle.

2 years ago
0

Oh, here's another good theme, about childhood and imagination vs. adulthood and imagination, and fantasy being what children should read about in order to stimulate their imaginations. So is fantasy literature and media an attempt to maintain a childlike way of thinking when adults consume it? Or is it something else when consumed later in life? Would an adult who "lives in a fantasy world" be as acceptable as an adult "who is obsessed with science"?