Moderate/ Severe Disabilities
&
Inclusive Public Settings

What are Moderate/Severe Disabilities?

As you have learned throughout this semester, all disabilities can range in severity. Each person with a disability is an individual and will have individual differences in the way the learn, move and live. Schools began categorizing students with disabilities as mild/moderate or moderate/severe in order to better facilitate the services they would need. A good example of this is autism. A student with autism will receive services based upon their individual needs. These needs may place them in a program that provides services for students with more severe needs. I think the following description helps distinguish mild-severe continuum as far as teaching is concerned.

"Licensure to teach students with severe disabilities prepares candidates to teach students whose difficulties require functional academics and life skills instruction (e.g., communication, social behavior, and daily living activities). These students may have intellectual disabilities, autism, other health impairments, multiple disabilities, or severe effects of traumatic brain injuries. Students with severe disabilities are most often taught in self-contained classrooms within the school. Where appropriate, these students are included in general classrooms; some may attend separate schools designed to meet their special needs." BYU School of Education

Final Assignment for Theme 3

Activity 1: Please add a photo or video to the Comment Stream at the bottom of this page.The photo or video should be an original photo or video you have taken. The image or video should show a public location that demonstrates how it is accessible to people with disabilities. This may be a playground as seen in the video above or an accessible feature of a building. It might even be something you find on campus. Each student should post one photo or video.

The final assignment for Theme 3 builds on your experiences with Case Studies in the previous modules. This time you will be responding to a Case Study independently. You may access the case study for our Final Assignment for Theme 3 from the link below. Please submit your response in CI Learn.

http://cases.coedu.usf.edu/TCases/Ginny.htm

In your response, you should respond to the following questions:

  1. List what you have learned about each of the characters in the case.
  2. What do you think is motivating the thoughts/actions of each of the characters?
  3. What are the issues/problems in the case?
  4. What events have transpired in Ginny’s life between the time she was 12 until now which might have contributed to her condition in the ninth grade?
  5. Why is it important for Ginny to be able to assist with toileting?
  6. Should there have been a more coordinated effort among social service agencies to address the challenges presented by Ginny and her family.
  7. What role did Ginny’s father play in her situation?
  8. What would you say to Ginny’s step-mother if you were given an opportunity to talk with her. What about her father?

** Be sure to cite your sources in your responses. This will mean looking back to information shared in the course and/or looking up library resources to support your ideas. Each response should have a minimum of three citations.

Comment Stream

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Brenda Rivas: My picture is above, I was lucky to take a picture of handicapped seating at seaworld along with getting this lovely man with his lovely shirt in my picture. =] Win win

2 years ago
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2 years ago
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This door outside of the CSUCI library has an automatic door push switch that allows for easier access to open doors.

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2 years ago
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This is the automatic door opener outside the Broome Library allowing access for all.

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A crosswalk through a parking lot leading to two handicapped parking spost in front of an office building

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2 years ago
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This is an ATM at my bank. There is not only braille but also audio for assistance for the visually impaired.