English 5061

August 29 - October 31

100% effort is required to make a splash in this class!

How to make a big splash in this class:

  • Come to every class on time with all your materials (ATTENDANCE)
  • Ask questions early (ATTITUDE)
  • Review, review, review (ACTION)

Materials for 5061

  • Paper, pens, pencils, highlighters, note cards
  • 3 ring binder
  • English dictionary/thesaurus (You cannot use an online dictionary during an exam)
  • Novel: "Ender's Game" by Orson Scott Card  ($11)
  • Grammar Book "G"  ($12)


WARNING...
potential roadblocks lay ahead!

Identify the roadblocks Lucy and Ethel encountered?


COMMON ROADBLOCKS YOU MAY FACE:

(Inconsistent attendance/lateness, technological distractions, incomplete assignments, inappropriate behaviour, failure to ask for help)

  • Students who are repeatedly late or absent will not be eligible to continue in this course.
  • Students must turn off their phones and will not be permitted to text during class time.
  • Only medical notes will be accepted for absences during exams.
  • Be respectful and polite, do not swear or speak inappropriately in the class or building.

I'm looking forward to getting to know each of you this semester and want to help you reach your goals! My email is tmartinow@lbpearson.ca

Elements of Language in the Final Exam

  • Listening (20%): You will listen to a dramatic performance and answer questions.
  • Reading (30%): You will read a passage from a novel and respond to questions.
  • Writing (30%): You will write a critical analysis of a play or a novel read in class.
  • Speaking (20%): You will create and perform a dramatization or lead a discussion on The Glass Menagerie, or a novel read in class.

To prepare you for the final exam you will participate in a variety of learning situations and activities to develop your ability to discuss and analyze plays, short stories and novels.

By October you will be able to discuss and analyze:

  • a play script "The Glass Menagerie" by Tennessee Williams.
  • a live/filmed audio play
  • short stories
  • a novel "Ender's Game" by Orson Scott Card.
  • a critical essay on a short story/novel.

You will be able to present orally:

  • a discussion of "The Glass Menagerie" by Tennessee Williams.

You will be able to produce:

  • a critical essay on "Ender's Game" by Orson Scott Card.

Is studying a problem
for you?

You may have good intentions to study but this may be your experience instead: Open your novel, or binder. Check your phone. Text. Read the first sentence of your novel, or handout.  Find a show on Netflix.  Read the second sentence of your novel, etc. Look through your friend's pictures on Facebook.  Re-read the first sentence of your novel, etc. again because you don't remember what it was about. Check your phone for text messages. Check Facebook again to see if anyone posted anything really cool. Read the first sentence. Slam your book closed in frustration because you just can't focus! Give up and go on your electronic device.

Does this sound like you?? There are so many things to do besides studying...

For some reason, when we have to study or do homework, everything else becomes so much more interesting. We are so surrounded by distractions that even doing school work becomes a challenge.

But our school work is not the only thing that suffers when we get distracted by social media.  There are other important things in our lives as well.  You know what they are.

So think about that this week....what has your attention? What do you spend most of your time thinking about? Is there a way to make those distractions harder to get to?

                                                                    Source: Adapted from Youth Website (Rachel)

Study Tips

How to Study & Concentrate

[1] Look over previous chapters or notes.  Write down everything you know already or what you remember in your own words.  Don't recopy your notes from the handout.

[2] Keep a pad of paper handy to jot down extraneous or confusing thoughts that cross your mind while studying, get them out of your mind and on to paper.

[3] Set study goals before you begin each period of study (number of pages, number of problems, etc.)

[4] Design adequate rewards after specified goals are attained.

[5] Break-up the content of study by mixing up subjects and building in variety and interest and removing boredom.

[6] Make the most of rest periods-do something quite different. Do some physical activity.

[7] Order and organize what was learned. (Star, use arrows, additional comments, etc.)

[8] Start with short study periods and build to longer periods only as fast as you maintain concentration.

[9] Get creative with online study tools and quiz yourself.  Perfect examples of such study tools would be online flashcards, mind maps, mnemonics, online study planners, video and audio resources.  I have already introduced you to QUIZLET. After you log in to quizlet type in ENGLISH 5061 LITERARY TERMS in the search bar.

Forgetting is most rapid right after learning. Review helps combat this. Relearning is easier if it is done quickly. Don't wait until it's all gone!

STEP UP TO WRITING

Example: Topic - Keeping healthy

I will be healthy this year.  First, I will play sports.  I will play soccer, baseball, and basketball.  Second, I will eat vegetables everyday.  I will eat vegetables at lunch and dinner.  I will buy vegetables I do not usually eat like, broccoli, cabbage, and tomatoes.  Finally, I will build muscle.  I will weight train three times each week. Playing sports, eating vegetables and weight training regularly will help me be healthy this year.

Can you identify the Topic Sentence, Reasons, Examples/Evidence, and Concluding Sentence?

The following Literary Elements
are covered in order to prepare you for your final exam!

Tone – The author’s attitude shown toward his characters, their actions and his plot.
Tone may be playful, formal, intimate, angry, serious, ironic, outraged, baffled, tender, serene, depressed, etc.  Tone refers to the speaker's attitude.

Mood – The emotional quality of the story that influences the attitudes of the characters and the readers.  Mood refers to the reactions of the reader.

Lesson on THEME

SETTING


When you write about a setting, you need to describe the time, place, and atmosphere of a story. You also need to use lots of descriptive words and make sure you appeal to the senses (sight, hearing, taste, touch, smell).

Examples of Setting

Which setting is more descriptive:

A or B

A

“All through October the days were still warm, like summer, but at night the mercury dropped and in the morning the sagebrush was sometimes covered with frost. Twice in one week there were dust storms. The sky turned suddenly gray and then a hot wind came screaming across the desert, churning up everything in its path. From inside the barracks the boy could not see the sun or the moon or even the next row of barracks on the other side of the gravel path. All he could see was dust. The wind rattled the windows and doors and the dust seeped like smoke through the cracks in the roof and at night he slept with a wet handkerchief over his mouth to keep out the smell. In the morning, when he woke, the wet handkerchief was dry and in his mouth there was the gritty taste of chalk.”

B

“When I walked outside, I saw a lot of white snow. I expected it to be cold, and it was. The snowman still was standing. I thought that maybe the snow would melt in the afternoon and I could stay outside longer since it might not be so cold. But I wouldn’t know for sure until the afternoon would come. In the meantime, I would go to school and stare out the window at the many winter sights wishing I could be rolling in the snow and throwing snowballs at friends. Maybe school will go quickly and the teacher will plan something fun for us all to do.”

Answer: A



TASK: For the following images write a description of the setting using the suggested vocabulary words.  Try to experiment with appealing to different senses.

Vocabulary ideas: decrepit, lonely, sunbathed, wilderness, overgrown, dormant.  

Vocabulary ideas: majestic, crisp, peaceful.

Vocabulary ideas:  powerful, relentless, unforgiving, vacant, bare.

Student examples of setting using the above pictures:

The overgrown wilderness lay silent as it was being gently brushed by the fresh wind of spring.  The grass was growing slowly around a decrepit shack, and some tall trees were sunbathing in the afternoon sun.

A fast flowing river cuts through the mountain side, with its relentless torrent of water abducting anything that's unfortunate enough to fall into its greedy waters.

In the bright winter morning sat the Cathedral tall and proud.  It kept its life even when the trees had long since lost their leaves.  It remained majestic in the crisp, chilly air with the sidewalks covered in a layer of fresh snow.

In the wilderness full of tall green trees, the wind blew gently.  The sun streamed down the tops of the trees sunbathing the lonely and dormant cabin which was overgrown with weeds, pines and wild flowers.  Down the old track a little stream flowed into the main river at the north side of the wilderness.

In the crisp air at the dawn of another winter day stood a majestic Cathedral.  The Cathedral was bathed with the first morning sun highlighting its turrets and showing off its beautiful outlines.  The snow glistened in the morning light all around the Cathedral and right in front stood an oak tree standing tall and proud.  The Cathedral and its surrounding gives off a peaceful atmosphere.

The river came tumbling, furiously down the mountain side.  In its wake it brought down trees and rocks, relentlessly and unforgivably, taking everything in its path.  It filled up all the vacant places with its swollen water in its eagerness to join the great river below the mountain.

Character Traits

A Character Trait is the way a character acts, speaks, and thinks.  You must use one word to describe the character's personality.

TASK: Choosing either the priest or Jean Valjean, identify two character traits displayed in the video clip above.  Provide evidence to support your findings.

Symbolism

Symbolism is when an object or person stands for some idea other than itself. The object or person may have a deeper meaning.

Point of View

First Person Point of View

In the first person point of view, the narrator participates in the action of the story. When reading stories in the first person, it is important to understand that what the narrator is recounting might not be the objective truth. We should question the trustworthiness of the account.  The first person point of view also uses pronouns like "I" in the story.

  • Example: I was minding my own business when Mom burst in. “What’s with you?” I grumbled.

Third Person Omniscient Point of View
Here the narrator does not participate in the action of the story as one of the characters, but lets the reader know exactly how the characters feel. We learn about the characters through this outside voice.  Third person omniscient uses pronouns like "he" and "she".

  • Example: "Jill was scared to admit that she liked Jack, but little did she know, he liked her too. In fact, as she spent her days trying to think up creative ways to avoid him, Jack was planning out creative ways to ask her to the school dance."

Third Person Objective Point of View
The narrator also does not participate in the action of the story as one of the characters, and is only able to tell the reader what the characters are saying and doing, not what they are thinking.  Third person objective uses the pronouns "he" and "she" as well.

  • Example: He gripped the dollar bill tightly. “You can’t have it,” he told her.

Third Person Limited Omniscient Point of View

The narrator tells the story through the eyes of one character only.  The narrator enters the mind of one character, not all of them.  This is the most common form of point of view.

  • Example:  “Hansel walked ahead of Gretel. Gretel dropped breadcrumbs behind her as she went, knowing that her bumbling brother couldn’t be counted on to find his way home from the outhouse, let alone from the middle of the woods.

Advantages and Disadvantages of P.O.V.

First person point of view (advantages):

  • provides immediate access to the story (explains events, fills in the action)
  • allows the reader to understand all the thoughts and feelings of the narrator

disadvantages:

  • makes it difficult for the narrator to describe himself

Third person objective (advantages):

  • it is the least intrusive (it may be the most reliable because it tells only what it sees)
  • it is useful in building suspense because it is ignorant of future events

disadvantages:

  • it relies heavily on action and dialogue
  • it can be superficial and lack psychological depth

Third person omniscient (advantages):

  • has the most flexibility
  • enables a story to capture both depth and breadth

disadvantages:

  • it can offer too many interpretations of the story
  • the story may lose its realism by revealing so much more than what is experienced in real life

Third person limited omniscient (advantages):

  • it helps the story be more realistic
  • it helps to unify the story

disadvantages:

  • the reader knows only what one character knows
  • you can't create dramatic irony as easily as with omniscient

Conflict

A conflict is the main struggle, or tension in a story, novel, or play that the protagonist is facing.  The protagonist can face a problem within him/herself or with another person or his/her environment.

Antagonist

An antagonist is someone who opposes someone else. In the book "How the Grinch Stole Christmas," the antagonist is the Grinch, because he tries to make life miserable for every Who down in Whoville.                                               Source: Vocabulary.com

Protagonist

A protagonist is the main character in a novel, play, movie, etc. or an important person who is involved in a competition, conflict, or cause.

                                                                                            Source: Merriam-Webster.com

Turning point/Climax

There can be many turning points in a story before a climax occurs.  

The climax can be referred to as the major turning point of a story.

It is a common misconception that the climax is the most exciting part of a story, but this is not always the case. Rather, the climax is the moment in the story when the momentum or feeling of the narrative shifts.

The main character may change, learn a lesson, or meet an important person, and this change will prepare the main character to resolve the conflict in the story.

                                                                            Source: EReadingWorksheets.com

How do we know it is a turning point/climax?

  • the major conflict of the plot is resolved or starts to get resolved
  • can be the most suspenseful/exciting part of the story (but not only this)
  • when the plot changes for better or for worse for the protagonist
  • often the antagonist is defeated in the climax
  • a character has a new understanding that will affect how they proceed toward the story goal
  • the protagonist makes a major decision that will affect the outcome of the story

Resolution

When an author writes a story, he/she often begins by placing his/her characters in some sort of predicament.  Once this predicament, or conflict, is established, the story has somewhere to go. The characters can begin trying their best to solve that conflict. Their efforts at doing so, and the challenges they face along the way, make up the body of the story. And when finally they reach a solution to the predicament, or reach a point where they can go no farther in trying to reach a solution, and fail, the story has achieved what's called resolution.

                                                                                          Defintion taken from: Study.com

Foreshadowing

Oral Presentation Guidelines



Guidelines/information:

1.  Your presentation must be 6-8 minutes long. You will lose marks if it is under 6 min. or over 8 min.

2.  Complete either a discussion or dramatization.  You may also come up with your own idea, such as an artistic representation of some aspect of the play, but you must obtain my approval before you begin.

3.  For both the discussion and the dramatization, you must encourage class participation/engagement.  The best way of doing this is by asking the class a question at some point during the presentation.

4.  Conform to the criteria on the checklist.

5.  The presentation is worth 20% of your mark.

6.  Everyone must be prepared to present on the due date.

7. You cannot read your presentation.  However, you may use cue cards while presenting.  Remember, you are being graded on how well you can communicate by speaking, not by reading.

8. It should be evident from your presentation that you have carefully read the play.  In order to demonstrate this, you must provide ample illustrations and demonstrate a thoughtful analysis of your chosen topic.   (Knowledge & understanding, presentation & language will be weighted equally.

9.  Have fun and be as creative as you can!

Suggested Activities:

Conduct an interview with the characters 10 years from the conclusion of the play.

Discuss one of the literary terms found in the play:  symbols, theme, conflict, etc.

Make a comparison of the characters in the play.

Perform a monologue by a character at a significant part in the play.

Role play reminiscences by a character from a point in later life.

Create a dialogue between two characters discussing their contrasting motivations or behaviors.

Invent an interview between the author (Tennessee Williams) and one of his characters.

Organize a trial by jury of a character who has done the unthinkable!

Present a scene or scenes from the play with a particular focus or interpretation in mind.

Write and perform an extra scene for the play.

Dream up and discuss an alternate ending for the play and it's implications.

Compose a poem with/without illustrations and provide an accurate analysis of it.

Paint or draw a picture that represents powerful elements of the play.

Create a musical piece inspired by the play.  (Sing and/or play an instrument).

Identify and explain important quotes from the play.

Bring in a shoebox with poems on it that Tom wrote.

Bring in a magazine that you think would be the modern version of what Amanda was selling.  Act as if you are a modern day Amanda Wingfield.  Copy her mannerisms and sales techniques and attempt to sell the subscriptions to the class.

Record similarities found between Tom and Tennessee.  In what ways does it change your view of the play to know about these connections?

Select or compose music that reflects one character within the play.  Title the music so it includes the character's name ("Amanda's Vision" or "The Gentleman Caller").  Share your selection with the class and explain why you chose that particular music and title.

How do these characters aspire to "The American Dream?"  What do they think "The American Dream" is?  How is our contemporary notion of "The American Dream" similar and different from how it is presented in the play?

Suggested Topics:

Escape or the impossibility of escape.

Family

Gender

Love and relationships

The importance of self-confidence in order to deal with one's own successes and failures. (Creating a positive future for yourself).

Reality and its' acceptance/denial.

Memory / the past

Illusion vs. reality

What makes The Glass Menagerie a classic?

Living with a handicap.

Things moms say and do.

Whose responsibility was Laura's future?

Outline/Plan for Oral Presentation

Decide whether you are doing a discussion or a dramatization.

Topic: ________________

Chosen activity:  ______________________________________________________________________

Personal view / argument: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Quotes/passage from the play to support your activity: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Explanation/analysis: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Literature Circle Descriptions, Qualifications, and Responsibilities

A "Literature Circle" is a group of 4-6 people that talk about different aspects of a novel they are reading.  You will all get to pick out what role you would like to fulfill. During group time you will be expected to share with your group your answers and get ready to participate in any discussions with them.

There are 6 "Literature Circle" group roles (choose one):

Illustrator

Description: Your job is to represent key scenes and characters from the reading. You may use your own drawings, collages from magazines, or appropriate pictures from the Internet.

Qualifications: A great imagination, good visual acuity, great attention to details in the novel, and artistic ability.

Responsibilities: You must provide at least one picture per group meeting of a character or a key scene (or both).

Literary Luminary

Description: Your job is to bring attention to key lines, quotes, and details from the text. Point out parts that you think are funny, confusing, interesting, or important.

Qualifications: Attention to detail, close-reading ability.

Responsibilities: Must keep up with the reading, must provide your group with at least five examples from the text to focus on.

Vocabulary Enricher

Description: To pick out any important and/or unfamiliar words and look up the definitions. You must also write a sample sentence using the word.

Qualifications: Must own a dictionary!

Responsibilities: You must find at least five words to look up and write their definitions for the group.

Connector

Description: Your job is to see relationships between the reading and the real world. The “real world” can consist of student’s personal lives, events at school or in the community or in the news.

Qualifications: Must be a news-junkie. Do you look up info on the Internet all day? Do you read newspapers? Do you watch the news every night? When someone wants to hear the latest gossip, do they come to you first? Then this job is for you!

Responsibilities: To keep an eye on world and community news for anything related to what we might be reading about during the week. Have an article to bring in for your group meeting to share with the group. Write a small description of the article and how it relates to the reading.

Summarizer

Description: Your job is to help your peers see the overall picture, an “eagle-eye” view, of the events in the novel. You are also to pick up on literary elements such as foreshadowing, symbolism, setting, character traits, theme, conflict, point of view, and protagonist/antagonist.

Qualifications: Close reading and the ability to always read ahead! The ability to see the “big picture.”

Responsibilities: You can not only tie items in the novel together (summarize the story so far), but you can also tie everything your group members have done together. Do you see a pattern emerging in the work that everyone did for this week? Did everyone seem to focus on the same thing without knowing it? Bring it up to the group and discuss it!

Investigator

Description: Your job is dig up background information related to the novel. You can find this info either in the library or on the Internet.

Qualifications: Similar to the “Connector.” Are you an investigative reporter in the making? Do you like searching out information? Do you like finding out secrets or interesting little tidbits that no one else knows? Then this job is for you!

Responsibilities: If you get your information off the Internet, make sure it is clean and reliable!! You must bring in something of interest by the first meeting. Here’s an idea for your first assignment: find out more about the author.

Literature Circles were adapted from:

Andrikopoulos, Aisling M. "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time:Novel Unit". November 27, 2004. Online, http://www.geocities.ws/aandrikopoulos73/egl440no...

DaLie, Sandra Okura. “Students Becoming Real Readers: Literature Circles in High School English Classes.” Teaching Reading in High School English Classes. Ed. Bonnie O. Ericson. National Council of Teachers of English. Urbana, IL. 2001. 84-100.

English 5061 Exam Schedule

Writing Exam -  Tuesday, October 25
(You may bring your novel with your quotes highlighted or marked.  Practice writing out your essay over and over again.)

Speaking Exam (Oral Presentation) - Wednesday/Thursday, October 26/27

Listening Exam - Friday, October 28
(To prepare for the exam practice identifying literary elements while watching movies.  Don't forget the popcorn! Also, make sure you review your practice listening exams.)


Reading Exam - Monday, October 31
(Know your literary elements well by practicing on Quizlet, and by reviewing practice reading exams.)

Homework

Friday, September 9, 2016

  1. Literary terms:  Foreshadowing, Point of View, climax/turning point, Resolution.
  2. We reviewed STEP UP TO WRITING.  You handed in your paragraph answering the question: What kind of relationship do Tom and Laura have with their mother? You were asked to write it using STEP UP TO WRITING format.
  3. We read along and listened to scene 7 in "The Glass Menagerie".  
  4. Please complete all the short answer study questions for scenes 1 - 7.
  5. Fill out the handout identifying literary terms in "The Glass Menagerie".  If you were not here and didn't get the handout then make sure you find examples for the following literary terms:  theme, foreshadowing, symbolism, setting, conflict, character traits (Tom, Laura, Amanda, Jim), tone, mood, protagonist, antagonist, climax/turning point, and resolution.  Don't forget to record what scene and page # the examples came from.
  6. A link to the PDF text for "The Glass Menagerie" is on my tackk, or you can google it.
  7. Think about what social realities were occurring during the setting of the play (1930's).  For example, young men were looking for more adventure in life so they were quick to sign up for the Merchant Marines.  Write down some of your ideas.
  8. Homework is due on Monday.  I hope you enjoy your weekend!

Monday, September 12, 2016

  1. We talked about symbolism, tone, mood, foreshadowing, and climax in "The Glass Menagerie".
  2. You were asked to complete a variety of questions about the play that will help prepare you for your Oral Presentation.  In order for you to answer the questions thoroughly, you must look at the play online to find evidence/examples to support your answers.
  3. Quiz on English 5061 Literary Terms:  Wednesday, September 14.  Study, study, study!
  4. Homework:  Spend one hour on your questions.  

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

  1. We continued discussing examples of symbolism from the play.  For example, I explained that on page 5 and 38, Guernica is mentioned.  I explained that it is necessary to investigate/research Guernica on the internet and find out more about it.  How does it relate to the play?  We discovered that Guernica is a city in Spain that was bombed by the Nazi's in 1937 during the Spanish Civil War.  What has a civil war have to do with "The Glass Menagerie"?  Civil war has to do with conflict between people in their own country.  In "The Glass Menagerie" there was a "war" going on in the Wingfield apartment.  Tom and Laura were stuggling to survive under the constant direction and interference of their mother.  
  2. You were asked to choose a topic from "The Glass Menagerie" and prepare a one paragraph response using Step Up To Writing.  Choose A, B, or C.  A. A play presents the author's view on a particular aspect of life.  Identify and agree or disagree with the author's point of view presented in scenes three and/or four. B.  Choose a main character and discuss how his/her actions in scenes three and/or four relate to the social reality presented in the novel. C.  Choose a significant passage from the novel and discuss how it reflects a recurring idea/message/theme/symbol presented in scenes three and/or four.  For example, A. Tennessee William's view on the stressful effects of "The Great Depression" is demonstrated through the character of Tom. B. The actions of Laura Wingfield present the social reality that women of her generation were ill-equipped to be successful as a single woman. OR The social reality of the role of men present in"The Glass Menagerie" is seen through the character of Tom.  C. The idea of a "gentlemen caller" as the solution to all the Wingfield's problems was a recurring theme throughout "The Glass Menagerie" as shown in scene 4: "...as soon as Laura has got somebody to take care of her,married, a home of her own, independent why,then you'll be free to go wherever you please..."
  3. Please continue to work on your questions and your paragraph.  They will be due later on this week.
  4. Quiz on English 5061 Literary Terms tomorrow.  Search on the internet: English 5061 Literary Terms Quizlet to help you prepare for the quiz.

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

  1. We talked about how to choose a topic from "The Glass Menagerie" and analyse it by examining the effect(s) of the topic on the character(s), and applying it to our life or life in general. For example, you can explore the topic of having a confident (someone in your life that you can confide in about important things). Significant passage: In Scene six, beginning on page 60 Tom begins to open up and share with Jim about his plans to join the Merchant Marines. He continues to share about his frustration of being unable to live an adventurous life. He explains that he cannot stay in his home any longer. "I'm tired of the movies. ...All of those glamorous people - having adventures - hogging it all, gobbling the whole thing up! You know what happens? People go to the movies instead of moving! ...I'm tired of the movies and I am about to move!" (p.61). Analysis: Unfortunately, Jim does not offer any sound advice or provide very much sympathy to Tom. They did not cultivate that kind of relationship at the Shoe Factory. They rarely spent time with one another outside of work. Consequently, Tom did not experience the benefit of a transparent, close relationship with a friend, especially when he needed someone the most. Questions: Do you have someone you can confide in? What do you confide in about to your friends? Do you talk about important things, or do you only talk about superficial things? How is your life different because you have someone you can talk to? Application to life/personal viewpoint/argument: Many people have someone they can trust enough to share personal things with. Having someone to share personal things with can provide strength, encouragement, and peace of mind. Life is full of many challenges and it is often necessary to build meaningful relationships with people so that we can receive comfort and support. Parents often share about the struggles they have with their children with other parents and quickly discover that they are not alone in their frustration or concern for their children. Sometimes advice is shared that can improve the situation or deepen a friendship because of the shared experience the parents have.
  2.   You received a handout on the expectations of the Oral Presentation and a second handout on the outline of the Oral.  We looked over ideas that are listed on my tackk.  Please choose a topic and activity for the Oral and begin working on it.  
  3. Your Paragraph response for "The Glass Menagerie" is due on Friday, September 16.
  4. You expressed your opinion on different statements about adults, safety, violence, competition, technology, and how to treat others.  Next, you picked one statement and wrote a paragraph on why you agreed or disagreed with the statement.  For example, I totally agree that physical violence is never appropriate to solve a problem.  First of all, when physical violence is used to clear up a disagreement it only perpetuates more violence.  For example, when a child experiences physical harm it leads a child to conceptualize the world in deviant ways that later will cause the child to resort to violence. Second of all, physical violence can lead to substance abuse.  For example, children who grow up in violent homes are more likely to abuse drugs, alcohol, and resort to criminal behavior.  Clearly, physical violence is not a healthy way to overcome complications but only leads to more troubles.
  5. We had a class discussion on what skills we use to play games and why rules are important.  How does it feel to play a game when you don't know the rules or where the rules are constantly changing?  How is that like real life?  Where do rules change?  What are some situations in life with spoken and unspoken rules?

Thursday, September 15, 2016

  1. We began the novel, "Ender's Game" by Orson Scott Card.  We read Chapter 1 and 2 in class.  You must read Chapter 3 and 4 for homework.
  2. Please answer questions Chapter 1 to 4 in the "Comprehension Journal."  It is due tomorrow.
  3. I explained that each chapter begins with a brief dialogue between unseen people.  In this dialogue, you can find a purpose for reading the chapter.  What questions are raised in your mind as you read the introduction?  How are your questions answered? The following example is a summary of the purpose of Chapter 1. "They" have watched Ender and can read his thoughts.  Ender's brother has problems.  Ender is too malleable.  He is too willing to submerge himself in someone else's will, but not his enemies will.  "They" want to surround him with enemies so that he will remain creative in battle situations.  Questions that I wrote down after chapter 1.  Can you trust someone who is willing to surround you with enemies?  What other reasons made his brother impossible?  How far are "they" willing to go to save the world?
  4. Grammar:  Lesson 22.  I have the answer key.  Come and ask me for it when you are done.
  5. We spent time working on our Oral Presentation.  Your activity for your Oral is due tomorrow, Friday, September 16.  I wrote an example of how to fill out your outline in the homework posted on Wednesday, September 14.

Friday, September 16, 2016

  1. You were given more time to work on your Oral Presentation.  I wrote a few examples on the board to show you how to identify theme or other important topics in the play. First, write down the topics in "The Glass Menagerie."  For example: family, dreams, illusion vs. reality, escape, self-confidence, memory, abandonment, communication, etc. Next, write down what the author is saying about these topics. For example, look at the topic of communication.  Based on the actions of characters the author is telling us that a breakdown in communication leads to failure in relationships.  Tom and Amanda cannot talk about deeper things without fighting.  Laura would rather run from her problems than talk about them.  Although Jim is able to coax Laura out of her shell, he kisses her before telling her that he is engaged.  Choose another topic and try doing the same thing.
  2. We read part of Chapter 5 in "Ender's Game."  Please finish reading Chapter 5 and answer the questions for Chapter 5 in the "Comprehension Journal."
  3. Continue working on your Oral Presentation.  It is due next Friday, September 23.
  4. If you have not handed in your paragraph response to "The Glass Menagerie", it is due on Monday, September 19.  I handed out an example of how to do it.  I also gave more instructions for it on my homework post on Tuesday, September 13.

Monday, September 19, 2016

  1. We spent time working on the Oral Presentation for "The Glass Menagerie".  I started meeting with you to make sure you were on the right track.  I also gave feedback about your paragraph writing (Step Up To Writing) and your Quiz on English 5061 literary terms.
  2. We read Chapter 6 in "Ender's Game" today and answered the questions in the "Comprehension Journal". Don't forget to take notes on theme, conflict, symbolism, character traits, foreshadowing, tone, mood, protagonist, antagonist, climax, resolution, etc. and any important quotes that could be used as evidence in your essay on "Ender's Game".
  3. Grammar: Lesson 23.

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

  1. Short story: "One of These Days" by Gabriel Garcia Marquez. You were asked to read the story and identify: conflict, theme, symbolism, character traits (Aurelio and the Mayor), setting, and point of view.  We discussed the answers in class. You handed in your paper.
  2. You worked on your Outline for your Oral Presentation and handed it in.  I continued meeting with you about your oral.
  3. You also had time to work on "Ender's Game" "Comprehension Journal" Questions.  Chapter 1 - 6 is due Wednesday, September 21.

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

  1. We read chapter 7 in "Ender's Game" and completed the "Comprehension Journal" questions.
  2. We discussed the different types of conflict present in "Ender's Game" and the rising action of the plot.
  3. Are you seeing a pattern develop in the novel, "Ender's Game",  that is giving you an idea for an essay topic?
  4. More time was given to work on correcting your mistakes in your Outline for your Oral Presentation.  Oral Presentation due on Friday, September 23.

Thursday, September 22, 2016

  1. We worked on "The Glass Menagerie" OUTLINE.  I invited Margot into the class to help me meet with all of you to ensure that you understood what was required of you.  OUTLINE REQUIREMENTS:  (1) Choose at least 3 passages that relate to your topic. Make sure to include the page # and the Scene. (2) Connect each passage to your life or to life in general. (3) Explain why the characters were behaving the way they were.  What was their motivation behind their actions?

Friday, September 23, 2016

  1. We read chapter 8 in "Ender's Game".
  2. Your script (what you are planning to say in your Oral Presentation) is due today.  If you do not hand it in you will not be able to present your Oral.

Monday, September 26, 2016

  1. We read chapter 9 in "Ender's Game".
  2. We talked about potential themes in "Ender's Game".  They are: Lack of communication leads to problems; Human nature is to destroy that which we do not understand; Humans have a competitive nature; Adults have strange attitudes towards children; People wear identities and unconsciously become them; The enemy is the only real teacher.  These themes can be used to help us choose a topic for our essay.
  3. Chapter 9 "Journal Comprehension Questions" due Wednesday.

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

  1. We mainly worked on correcting our "Glass Menagerie" OUTLINES and completing our Scripts for our ORALS.
  2. Grammar:  Lesson 14 - Every sentence has two main parts, a complete subject and a complete predicate.  Lesson 20 - A clause is a group of words that contain a subject and a predicate.  An independent clause can stand alone as a sentence.  A subordinate clause cannot stand alone as a sentence because it does not express a complete thought.
  3. We started correcting our mistakes in "One of These Days" by Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

  1. We read chapter 10 in "Ender's Game".  Chapter 10 "Journal Comprehension Questions" are for homework.
  2. Finish your corrections on "One of These Days".
  3. We spent five minutes writing a "Quickwrite".  Instructions:  Take 5 minutes and write down serious thoughts on the topic provided.  Spelling and Grammar do not count, just get your thoughts down.  Today's topic:  Leader's and Friends.  All of us have either been a leader or served under a leader.  Why is it so difficult for people to be friends with their leaders?  Or (the flip side) why is it so difficult for leaders to befriend their followers.  What would happen if leaders and followers were friends?  Would it be a good thing or a bad thing?  How come?

Thursday, September 29, 2016

  1. Grammar: Lesson 22, 24 - 25.
  2. Review the literary elements found in the short story, "One of These Days" by Gabriel Garcia Marquez.  We discussed the answers in class.  Please hand in your corrections.
  3. Practice Reading Exam: "The Landlady" by Roald Dahl.  You were given two sheets of questions to complete.  Your questions are due tomorrow.

Friday, September 30, 2016

  1. We read chapter 11 in "Ender's Game" and answered the "Journal Comprehension Questions".
  2. We identified how Valentine is like or unlike Demosthenes, and how Peter is like or unlike John Locke.
  3. We found passages and quotes that support the various themes in "Ender's Game".

Friday, October 21, 2016

  1. We complete a practice listening test, "The Hitch Hiker".  There is at tab above that will link you to the story.  We only listened to the story once in class, but you can listen to it a second time on your own at home.  You need to complete the questions that go with the story and hand it in.
  2. We also reviewed how to write an introduction and a conclusion for your critical essay.  Follow these steps when writing your introduction for your 5061 Critical Essay:  
  • Start with a hook. (A general, interesting sentence about your topic. Something that will immediately get the reader thinking about your topic.)
  • Introduce the title of the book, the author, and your topic.
  • Say more about your topic.
  • Write about your main points.
  • Lastly, write your thesis statement.

Example of Introduction for English 5061 Essay

The potential for living a productive and healthy life comes down to surrounding oneself with supportive people. In the book, “Ender’s Game”, Orson Scott Card describes the challenges of living in a cruel environment. The protagonist, Ender Wiggins, is commissioned to battle school where he is subjected to brutal and unnatural conditions. Fortunately, Ender overcame many obstacles initiated by his superiors and became brave and inventive. Although Colonel Graff’s strategies were cruel in preparing Ender for the final battle, they helped Ender be fearless and creative.

Follow these steps for your conclusion:

  • Start with your thesis stated in different words. Vary your language. Summarize important information.
  • Bring together all the main points of your introduction and body and convince the readers of your position.
  • Tie up loose ends from thesis and challenge the readers to think more broadly about the topic.
  • Encourage your readers to take action.

Example of Conclusion for English 5061 Essay

Despite the fact that Colonel Graff places Ender in merciless circumstances, Ender thrives and develops a courageous and ingenious character.  Colonel Graff lacked the confidence in Ender to allow him to demonstrate growth at his own rate.  He often obstructed Ender's attempts to break free from the battle school's rules and regulations. Graff had several opportunities as Ender's teacher to offer support and encouragement to him, but made other choices that put Ender under significant amounts of stress. Unsupportive teaching has lasting negative effects on future generations.  Not every teacher is equipped with the skills or resources to mentor well.  It is important that when given the opportunity to coach or train an individual, all instructors need to responsibly and humbly guide their students.

3. You must write out your 5 paragraph essay following the template that I gave you. Write out your introduction and conclusion separately. Your essay is due on Monday, October 25.

Make sure that you have five paragraphs in your essay and that it has an Introduction, 3 Body Paragraphs, and a Conclusion. (Every body paragraph should have a topic sentence, reason, example, explanation, second reason, second example, second explanation, third reason, third example, third explanation, and concluding sentence.)

Tuesday, January 5

  1. Class expectations and welcome!
  2. Short writing sample on a chosen topic
  3. Chocolate chip cookies and literature.  What is the connection between them?

Wednesday, January 6

  1. Making cookies, literature and other professions in life have their own vocabulary.
  2. The 5061 Literary Terms
  3. Listening: "The Monkey's Paw" by W.W.Jacobs and comprehension questions.
  4. We went into the lab and signed up to Quizlet where one can access the English 5061 Literary Terms to practice.

Thursday, January 7

  1. Reading: "Routine" and answered some basic comprehension questions.
  2. SETTING: wrote 3 descriptions of setting.

Friday, January 8

  1. Destiny, Freewill and "The Monkey's Paw"
  2. Foreshadowing and flashback slide-share presentation
  3. Identifying foreshadowing in "The Monkey's Paw"
  4. Tone and Mood
  5. Keep practicing your English 5061 Literary Terms!

Monday, January 11

  1. Protagonist/Antagonist
  2. Character Traits: Identify character traits of Jean Valjean, the priest, Liz, and someone who you admire.  Always provide examples to support each character trait.  Character traits are demonstrated through the way someone acts, speaks, and thinks.
  3. "The Landlady" by Roald Dahl
  4. Mood/Tone:  Do you know the difference between them?                                                                                                                                                                       

Can you identify mood and tone in the following examples?

Example A:  The stately mansion gleamed under a fresh coat of white paint. A giant window over the double-door entry let light in and let the sparkling reflections from the chandelier in the foyer dazzle those who came up the crushed-stone driveway.


Example B:  The old mansion's paint was peeling away; the once-white paint had mildewed and faded to a slushy gray. The giant window over the double-door entry was cracked and partially missing; a large shard jutted up from the bottom of the frame like a single jagged tooth. The doors themselves hung slightly askew and looked as though they'd tried to keep out a pack of wild, scratching dogs, but had failed.  

You can check your answers with me anytime!

Tuesday, January 12

  1. Make sure you have identified the following literary elements in "The Landlady": Setting, Flashback, Foreshadowing, Tone, Mood, Protagonist, Antagonist, 2 Character Traits of one of the characters.
  2. Point of View:  First Person, Third Person Objective, Third Person Limited Omniscient, Third Person Omniscient
  3. Grammar Exercises: Lesson 14 Page 18 Part A and Page 19 Part D

Wednesday, January 13

  1. The advantages and disadvantages of First Person Point of View, Third Person Objective Point of View, Third Person Limited Omniscient Point of View, Third Person Omniscient Point of View.
  2. Symbolism
  3. Theme
  4. Grammar Exercises

Thursday, January 14

  1. Symbolism and Theme revisited
  2. Step Up To Writing - There are four main parts of a paragraph: Topic Sentence, Reasons, Examples, and Concluding Sentences.  Your assignment was to choose 5 topics and write 5 Topic Sentences and 5 Concluding Sentences.  Topic Sentences introduce what you will be writing about.                      Concluding sentences repeat what the topic sentence says but uses different words (synonyms).                                                                                                For example, my topic is my favorite subject in school.                                        My topic sentence:  I enjoy most subjects in school, but math is my favorite subject.                                                                                                                  My concluding sentence:  Even though math is my best subject, I appreciate all subjects in school.
  3. Grammar:  Subject, Predicate, Direct Object, and Indirect Object.   Remember that you need a subject and a predicate in order to write a complete sentence.       *There are two kinds of objects that follow verbs: direct objects and indirect objects.                                                                                                                        *To determine if a verb has a direct object, isolate the verb and make it into a question by placing "whom?" or "what?" after it.                                                        *For example: The advertising executive drove a flashy red Porsche.  Question: Drove whom? or Drove what? Answer: a flashy red Porsche.             *An indirect object (which, like a direct object, is always a noun or pronoun) is, in a sense, the recipient of the direct object. To determine if a verb has an indirect object, isolate the verb and ask to whom?, to what?, for whom?, or for what? after it. The answer is the indirect object.                                                                         *For example: Her secret admirer gave her a bouquet of flowers.                Question:  Gave to whom?  Gave to what? Gave for whom? or Gave for what?  Answer: her.                                                                                                  Source: Examples and definitions taken from http://arts.uottawa.ca              /writingcentre/en/hypergrammar/the-parts-of-the-sentence
  4. You must finish all of Lesson 14, Lesson 17 and Lesson 18 in your Grammar Book (G).

Friday, January 15

  1. Grammar exercises corrected together.
  2. Symbolism:  we discussed the answers to the 7 symbols assigned in class and talked about other symbols from well-known stories.
  3. Step Up To Writing - We spent time writing our Reasons today.  Reasons must use transition words.  For example:  First of all, second of all, third of all, one way, another way, the last way, next, finally, etc. More transition word examples are written in the yellow section of The Step Up To Writing package I handed out in class.                                                                                                                     If my topic is my favorite subject in school, which is math, then I must give reasons why math is my favorite subject.  

For example:  

Reason 1:  First of all, math is my favorite subject because it will prepare me for my career.

Reason 2:  Second of all, math is my favorite subject because I can measure my progress more quickly compared to other subjects.

Monday, January 18

  1. Grammar:  Fragmented Sentences and Run-on Sentences.  We reviewed Direct Object and Indirect Object as well as worked on Lesson 26 pg.32 and Lesson 27 pg. 33.
  2. Setting: We talked about how characters interact physically and emotionally with their setting.  When the setting is well done it supports the reader's belief of even the most unusual behaviors of your characters.
  3. "The Glass Menagerie" by Tennessee Williams.  We read Scene 1.

Tuesday, January 19

  1. Grammar:  Marked pg. 32 and 33
  2. Conflict:  There are 4 types of Conflict - Human vs. human, human vs. nature, human vs. society, and human vs. self.
  3. "The Glass Menagerie" Read Scene 2 and 3.  We met in groups and briefly answered questions relating to Scene 1 - 3.

Wednesday, January 20

  1. "The Glass Menagerie" Read Scene 4.
  2. Paragraph assignment: What kind of relationship do Tom and Laura have with their mother?  Use Step Up To Writing to complete your paragraph using three reasons. Due: Thursday, January 21  
  3. Review of the ORAL PRESENTATION guidelines.  Presentation due February 22. Check my tackk for more information.

Thursday, January 21

  1. "The Glass Menagerie" Read Scene 6 and part of Scene 7 until page 71
  2. Answer Questions from Scene 4 - Scene 6
  3. Take notes on theme, setting, conflict, and foreshadowing.
  4. Paragraph assignment:  What are some positive ways people escape the daily pressures of life?  Use Step Up To Writing to write your paragraph and provide three reasons.

Friday, January 22

  1. We talked about how to choose a topic from the play and analyse it by examining the effect(s) of the topic on the character(s), and applying it to our life or life in general.  For example, we explored the topic of having a confident (someone in your life that you can confide in about important things).  Significant passage: In Scene six, beginning on page 60 Tom begins to open up and share with Jim about his plans to join the Merchant Marines.  He continues to share about his frustration of being unable to live an adventurous life. He explains that he cannot stay in his home any longer. "I'm tired of the movies. ...All of those glamorous people - having adventures - hogging it all, gobbling the whole thing up!  You know what happens?  People go to the movies instead of moving!  ...I'm tired of the movies and I am about to move!" (p.61).Unfortunately, Jim does not offer any sound advice or provide very much sympathy to Tom.  They did not cultivate that kind of relationship at the Shoe Factory.  They rarely spent time with one another outside of work.  Consequently, Tom did not experience the benefit of a transparent, close relationship with a friend, especially when he needed someone the most. Questions: Do you have someone you can confide in?  What do you confide in about to your friends?  Do you talk about important things, or do you only talk about superficial things?  How is your life different because you have someone you can talk to?  Application to life:  Many people have someone they can trust enough to share personal things with.  Having someone to share personal things with can provide strength, encouragement, and peace of mind.  Life is full of many challenges and it is often necessary to build meaningful relationships with people so that we can receive comfort and support.  Parents often share about the struggles they have with their children with other parents and quickly discover that they are not alone in their frustration or concern for their children.  Sometimes advice is shared that can improve the situation or deepen a friendship because of the shared experience the parents have.  
  2. Read Scene 7 "The Glass Menagerie"
  3. We answered Scene 7 questions.
  4. We began answering Research Questions on "The Glass Menagerie" which will help you prepare for your Oral Presentation.

Monday, January 25

  1. We spent time analyzing "The Glass Menagerie".  We continued answering the Research Questions on the play.  Work on the questions first that will help you prepare for your Oral Presentation.
  2. Symbolism handout:  Continue to identify what each symbol represents and try to come up with new symbols from the play.  For example, Jim's gum symbolizes the women in his life.  Gum is sticky and clingy.  Jim does not like clingy women.
  3. We spent time reviewing how to present an Oral Presentation.  Look on my tackk where I give more information on what you need to include in your presentation. For example, you must ask the class questions related to your topic, share your personal view and apply your topic to your life or to life in general, choose at least 3 passages or quotes that support your topic, and explain/analyze your quotes.
  4. Your Outline/Plan for your Oral Presentation is due on Wednesday, January 27th.

Wednesday, January 27

  1. We looked at a picture of a homeless family and wrote a response to the following questions:  (a)  “What would you think if you saw this family on the street? (b)  What kinds of assumptions and judgments would you make? (c)  Have you seen families like this before? (d)  How do you think they feel?
  2. We discussed as a class if it is fair to make judgments about people based on their appearances?  Questions due next class, Thursday, January 28.

Friday, January 29

  1. "The Glass Castle" by Jeannette Walls:  We read from page 18 - 49.  You were asked to take notes on character traits, character's beliefs, conflict, and passages that relate to a recurring themes/ideas/messages.  You also need to identify how a character's actions relate to a social reality in the novel as well as identify the author's point of view on a particular aspect of life. For example, on page 14 Jeannette's dad said, "You just trust your old man,"..."You don't have to worry anymore, baby,"..."You're safe now."  Again, on page 17, Jeannette's dad says, "Don't you worry,"..."You leave that to me.  Don't I always take care of you?" These quotes give us reason to start questioning whether Jeannette's dad really can be trusted.  Do his words match up with his actions?  That is what we need to investigate.  We need to watch for other quotes that demonstrate her dad's invitation to trust him.
  2. Please answer the following 2 questions: (1) What impression of Jeannette's mother do you get in the first section (p. 3-5)?  Why do you think she chooses to begin the memoir with this encounter?  (2)  How do Jeannette's parents explain the "skedaddle?"  How do they justify all the moves?  What are Jeannette and her siblings' reactions to constantly moving?
  3. Please practice your 5061 Literary Terms.  You will be having a quiz on them next week!

Monday, Feb.1

  1. "The Glass Castle":  We read from page 48 - 71.
  2. We worked on our "The Glass Menagerie" writing assignment questions.

Tuesday, Feb. 2

  1. We attended a play called, "Squawk" at Allancroft.  Were you able to identify the literary elements in the play?

Wednesday, Feb. 3 - Feb. 11

  1. We have been reading "The Glass Castle" and are up to page 268.
  2. While you are reading you should be taking notes on conflict, themes, symbolism, setting, character traits, foreshadowing, climax, mood, tone, point of view, resolution, etc.
  3. We have also been highlighting and recording quotes that will support our reasons in our essay.
  4. You have written four paragraphs on different essay ideas.  You must complete all four paragraphs by Friday, February 12.
  5. We started our 5 paragraph essay on "The Glass Castle".  A 5 paragraph essay has an Introduction, 3 Body Paragraphs, and a Conclusion.  Look at the following example for the three body paragraphs. You must have a thesis statement to start. Thesis Statement: Rex and Rose Mary are unfit parents because they are lazy, careless, and neglectful.                                                                                     First Body Paragraph: Rex and Rose Mary are unfit parents because they are lazy. First of all, they are lazy because they do not want to go to work. For example, Rose Mary did not want to work as a teacher and resisted getting up in the morning even though it provided an income for their family. "In the morning she slept late and pretended to be sick. It was up to Lori, Brian, and me to get her out of bed and see to it that she was dressed and at school on time" (p.74). Her children were the ones who were getting her up in the morning, cleaning her classroom, and marking her student's homework. Second of all, …. For example, … “….” (p. ). Explanation. Third of all, …. For example, …. “….” (p. ). Concluding sentence.                                                                                                           Second Body Paragraph: Rex and Rose Mary are unfit parents because they are careless. One reason that they are careless is because they exposed their children to sex-offenders. For example, after Brian and Jeannette had chased away a pervert from Jeannette's bedroom in the middle of the night, their parents still refused to close the doors and windows at night when the children went to bed. "I asked Mom and Dad if we should close the doors and windows when we went to sleep. They wouldn't consider it. We needed the fresh air, they said, and it was essential that we refuse to surrender to fear" (p.103). Their carelessness exposed their children to a greater risk of being sexually assaulted. Second of all, …..                                                                                              Third Body Paragraph: Rex and Rose Mary are unfit parents because they are neglectful. First, they are neglectful because they did not provide food for their children. For example, Rose Mary did not go to any effort to find food for her children. "If we asked Mom about food....she'd simply shrug and say she couldn't make something out of nothing. We kids usually kept our hunger to ourselves, but we were always thinking of food and how to get our hands on it" (p.68). Rose Mary seemed apathetic towards her children's hunger and did not even try to do the seemingly impossible to provide something to eat for them. In conclusion, Rex and Rose Mary's laziness, carelessness, and neglectfulness put their children at great risk. Second of all, …..
  6. We have also been preparing to identify all the literary elements in the play, "The Glass Menagerie".
  7. We learned how to write an introduction to our essay.  Follow these steps:
  • Start with a hook. (A general, interesting sentence about your topic. Something that will immediately get the reader thinking about your topic.)
  • Introduce the title of the book, the author, and your topic.
  • Say more about your topic.
  • Write about your main points.
  • Lastly, write your thesis statement.

Example of Introduction for English 5061 Essay

The potential for raising productive and healthy children comes down to a humble and thoughtful approach to parenting. In the memoir, "The Glass Castle", Jeannette Walls describes her upbringing and the challenges she and her siblings faced because their parents were unfit. Fortunately, Jeannette and her two older siblings overcame many obstacles initiated by their parents in their early years and thrived in their adult years. Her parents interfered with their maturation by setting a terrible example, exposing them to unsafe environments, and by not properly taking care of them. Rex and Rose Mary are unsuitable parents because they are poor role models, put their children in dangerous situations, and are neglectful.

Friday, February 12

  1. We wrote our CONCLUSION for the 5 Paragraph Essay on "The Glass Castle".  Look at the example below and follow the instructions.  Conclusion due: Tuesday, February 15.

Example of Conclusion for English 5061 Essay

Due to the fact that Rex and Rose Mary are ill-equipped role models, place their children in threatening surroundings, and are inattentive to their children, they are inadequate parents. They lacked the tools or ambition to build a solid foundation for their children's healthy growth. Often, they would obstruct their children's attempts to break free from their home environment and living conditions. Rex and Rose Mary had many opportunities to properly care for their children but made other choices that impacted their children negatively. Poor parenting has lasting effects and can impact future generations. Not everyone is equipped with the skills or resources to parent well. It is important that when children arrive all parents prepare themselves with what they need to responsibly and humbly raise their children.

Follow these steps for your conclusion:

1. Start with your thesis stated in different words. Vary your language. Summarize important information.

2. Bring together all the main points of your introduction and body and convince the readers of your position.

3. Tie up loose ends from thesis and challenge the readers to think more broadly about the topic.

4. Encourage your readers to take action.

      2.  You must write out your 5 paragraph essay following the template that I gave you.            Write out your introduction and conclusion separately.  Your rough copy for                    your essay is due on Tuesday, February 16.

Make sure that you have five paragraphs in your essay and that it has an Introduction, 3 Body Paragraphs, and a Conclusion.  (Every body paragraph should have a topic sentence, reason, example, explanation, second reason, second example, second explanation, third reason, third example, third explanation, and concluding sentence.)

       3.  You must also write out your Oral Presentation. Don't forget to apply your topic to your life or to life in general.  Make sure you have examples of quotes from "The Glass Menagerie" to back up whatever you are presenting.  You must explain how your quotes are important and how they contribute to the overall understanding and meaning of the play.  Lastly, you must ask the class at least three meaningful questions about your topic.  (If you are having a hard time, ask me and I will be happy to help you!)

     4.   Review your Literary Terms on quizlet or from the handout I gave out to you at the beginning of the course.

Friday, February 19

  1. Congratulations on completing your Writing Exam.
  2. Prepare for your Oral Presentation over the weekend.  First, make sure you have examples of quotes from "The Glass Menagerie" to back up whatever you are presenting. You must explain how your quotes are important and how they contribute to the overall understanding and meaning of the play. Next,  remember to apply your topic to your life or to life in general. Lastly, you must ask the class at least three meaningful questions about your topic.  You will be marked on content and how you present your Oral.  Make sure you speak clearly and loudly with expression!
  3. Don't forget to keep practicing your 5061 Literary Terms.

Study hard!

Tuesday, February 23

Answers to Practice Listening and Reading Exams  

"Robinson Crusoe" by Daniel Defoe

1. Crusoe: (1) caring - "...and I began really to love the creature..." (2) inquisitive - "I asked Friday a thousand questions about the country..." Friday: (1) scared - "The poor creature, who had at a distance, indeed, seen me kill the savage, his enemy, but did not know, nor could imagine how it was done, was sensibly surprised, trembled, and shook..." (2) obedient - "...beckoned to him to run and fetch it, which he did..."

2. Crusoe and Friday have a mentor student relationship. Crusoe educates Friday on the benefits of more civilized living. "...and in a little time Friday was able to do alll the work for me as well as I could do it myself."

3. First person point of view is used in the story. It is a good choice because we know the thoughts and feelings of the narrator as well as his/her perspective. First person point of view also gives us immediate access to the story.

4. Symbol: Gun. It represents something that is feared and worshiped like an idol.

5. The significance of relationships. Explanation: We all need close relationships/connections with others. Crusoe and Friday start out having a master student relationship but it develops into a close bond like brothers, which exceeds Crusoe's colonizing position.

"The Landlady" by Roald Dahl

1. The setting of "The Landlady" is in Bath, England at a Bed and Breakfast. "Green curtains (some sort of velvety material) were hanging down on either side of the window. The chrysanthemums looked wonderful beside them. He went right up and peered through the glass into the room, and the first thing he saw was a bright fire burning in the hearth. On the carpet in front of the fire, a pretty little dachshund was curled up asleep with its nose tucked into its belly." This is what Billy saw from the window of the B & B.

2. Third person limited omniscient point of view. It is a good choice because it allows us to know the thoughts of only Billy and not the Landlady which creates more suspense and mystery. We are only able to infer at the end what she is planning to do to Billy!

3. Trust your instincts before it is too late. If something does not feel right or feels strange, do what you think is best for the situation. Be more skeptical of situations that are too good to be true because it could save your life.

4. Billy: (1) brisk - "He was trying to do everything briskly these days. Briskness, he had decided, was the one common characteristic of all successful businessmen." (2) foolish - "You see, it isn't very often I have the pleasure of taking a visitor into my little nest. The old girl is slightly dotty, Billy told himself. But at five and sixpence a night, who gives a damn about that?" Landlady: (1) eager- "...he hadn't even had time to take his finger from the bell-button - the door swung open and a woman was standing there....he pressed the bell - and out she popped!" (2) hospitable - "why don't you come in out of the cold?"

5. One of the types of conflicts in the story is human vs. self. Billy is trying to decide whether to stay at the B & B or go on to the Bell and Dragon. "Billy decided that he would walk on and take a look at The Bell and Dragon before making up his mind. He turned to go. And now a queer thing happened to him. He was in the act of stepping back and turning away .... and the next thing he knew, he was actually moving across from the window to the front door of the house, climbing the steps that led up to it, and reaching for the bell."

"The Necklace" by Guy de Maupassant

1. Mathilde: (1) jealous - she does not want to visit her wealthy friend anymore. "She had a rich friend, an old school friend whom she refused to visit because she suffered so keenly when she returned home." (2) bitter - "And for the last ten years we have been paying for it."

2. Mathilde and Madame Forestier were school friends but did not mix in the same social circles. Their friendship is inconsistent but they are able to pick up where they leave off. Madame Forestier did not recognize Mathilde in the street after 10 years. She wondered why she looked so different and was so upset to hear that it was because of her necklace. "Oh my poor Mathilde, but it was only a fake..."

3. The point of view is third person limited omniscient.

4. Symbol: Necklace. It represents the world in which its the outside that matters, appearance. The necklace is glamorous, and it gives her the opportunity to be the woman she wants to be for one evening. However, the necklace is fake and she is only a clerk's wife, and not wealthy.

5. Mathilde believes that objects have the power to change her life, but when she finally gets them (the dress and the necklace) her happiness does not last. She gives up control of her happiness to objects that she does not even possess. Many people think if I only had this iphone, or car, or furniture set I would be able to experience life fully. However, our happiness should not be dependent on objects but on more important things like a loving family, friends, and basic shelter and food. In reality, the power does not lie with the objects but within oneself.

6. Sound effect: Piano instrumental and background laughter and chatter. It helped me understand how exciting the party was for Mathilde and how she enjoyed such a lively atmosphere with all the dancing and the mingling with important people.

"The Veldt" by Ray Bradbury

1. The protagonist is George Hadley because he is the man who has to make the big decision about the nursery. We hear how he thinks about this world, and we watch him make this crucial decision. The antagonists are the children because they are both united against their parents. They oppose their parents every step of the way and ultimately plan their demise.

2. One of the conflicts in the story is between the children and the parents. The children do not want to be told what to imagine or how often they can play in the nursery. They want complete control over the nursery and do not want their parents to interfere. The parents are highly disturbed when they check up on their children and discover that they have been spending all their time imagining an African Veldt. They clearly see that although the Veldt is beautiful it is full of violence. Lions and vultures are always tearing apart "something" and have an insatiable appetite for blood. One of the things that disturbs George and Lydia is that they cannot see what the lions are eating. They are also concerned because their children seem to be very attached to the nursery. The type of conflict is human vs. human. "because the children have thought about Africa and lions and killing so many days that the room is in a rut." "Could be." "Or Peter's set it to remain that way."..."I wouldn't want the nursery locked up," said Peter coldly. "Ever." "Matter of fact, we're thinking of turning the whole house off for about a month..."

3. One example of foreshadowing is expressed in two parts. At two points in the story the parents find old possessions of theirs in the nursery. The possessions that are found are George's old wallet and Lydia's old scarf. Both of the possessions are bloody and torn up when they find them, due to the fact that they have been torn up by the lions. This is also hinting at the inevitable demise of the parents in the nursery towards the end of the story.

4. The turning point/climax of the story is when George finally decides to shut off the nursery and the whole house and take a vacation from the technology. Event (1) The children convince George and Lydia to turn the nursery back on. Event (2) The children lock George and Lydia in the nursery and the lions attack and kill them.

5. The story is written in third person limited omniscient point of view because the narrator only reveals George's thoughts. Two benefits of this point of view are: it helps the story be more realistic, and it helps to unify the story.

6. Symbol: lions. What is represents: they represent the nature of power and hunger in the story. The author's descriptions of the lions seems to parallel the children at times, and the children begin to hunger a passive prey (which is their parents).

Thursday, February 25

  1. School is cancelled and no it is not April Fool's Day!
  2. Our Reading Exam is tomorrow, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26!

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